Search results

1 – 10 of 203
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Jonathan I. Rees and Christopher J. Rees

Highlights the fact that foreign language (FL) training is a problematic area for many companies. Outlines five approaches to FL training that can be adopted by…

Abstract

Highlights the fact that foreign language (FL) training is a problematic area for many companies. Outlines five approaches to FL training that can be adopted by organizations, ranging from the “language for all” approach to a highly selective approach based on job analysis and individual assessment. Points out that these approaches can be realized in part or whole by two very different implementation strategies.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Christopher J. Rees and John Hassard

The purpose of this paper is to explore the wide‐ranging nature of organizational change research and practice with reference to the diverse context of Asia.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the wide‐ranging nature of organizational change research and practice with reference to the diverse context of Asia.

Design/methodology/approach

Specific reviews of literature are highlighted which have identified the relative dearth of research which could be used to inform the theory and practice of management in Asia. The paper proceeds to offer an overview of the four papers included in this themed section on organizational change in Asia.

Findings

After reviewing the four papers, a summary is presented of two key themes which emerge from this body of work, that is, in the process of considering various aspects of organizational change in Asia, the four papers tend to place a relatively heavy emphasis upon the ownership of organizations, and issues directly associated with human resource management. These two themes are identified as recommended areas for future research.

Originality/value

This paper provides an introduction to the themed section on perspectives on organizational change in Asia.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Shaoheng Li and Christopher J. Rees

The purpose of this paper is to explore employers' perceptions of China's Labour Contract Law (LCL) and its influence on employment relations and human resource management…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore employers' perceptions of China's Labour Contract Law (LCL) and its influence on employment relations and human resource management practices in small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a qualitative approach based on 24 interviews with owners and human resource managers of 23 privately owned SMEs in eastern and western China.

Findings

Mixed levels of reported compliance with the provisions of the LCL legislation indicate that the regulatory adoptive behaviours of SME employers are partially explained by the coercive mechanism. Various strategies adopted by employers suggest that when under the pressure of law, SMEs are formalising their employment practices while simultaneously seeking to maintain a degree of informality in respect these practices.

Research limitations/implications

The adopted qualitative approach may limit the findings to be explorative within broader national contexts.

Practical implications

The move towards more formalised practices helps to address issues such as high turnover and widespread labour shortage in SMEs. The paper is likely to be of interest to policymakers seeking to gain insights into employers' perceptions as a means to develop more effective labour regulations.

Originality/value

Unlike most of existing literature examining the general compliance to the LCL and workers' perspectives, this paper reports the views of SME employers; as such, it offers an original contribution to understanding of the role and behaviours of SME employers in regulatory responses in the studied context.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Shaoheng Li, Christopher J. Rees and Mohamed Branine

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of HRM practices and two outcomes, namely, employee commitment and turnover…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship between employees’ perceptions of HRM practices and two outcomes, namely, employee commitment and turnover intention (TI), in small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in mainland China.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper adopts a quantitative approach based on a sample of 227 employees working in 24 SMEs in eastern and western China.

Findings

Employees’ perceptions of HRM practices, such as training and development, reward management and performance management, are significant predictors of employee commitment. A negative direct relationship is found between employees’ perceptions about the use of HRM practices and TIs.

Research limitations/implications

Although data were collected from two representative provinces of eastern and western China, the size of the sample may limit the generalisability of the findings to the wider region.

Practical implications

The relationship between employees’ perceptions of HRM practices and employee outcomes in Chinese SMEs provides an effective way for SME owners and HR practitioners to generate desirable employee attitudes and behaviours, which, ultimately contribute to improving organisational performance.

Originality/value

This is an original paper which makes a contribution by helping to address the dearth of studies which have explored aspects of the effectiveness of HRM in SMEs in China. In contrast to the majority of China-focussed studies on this topic, it highlights HRM outcomes at the individual level rather than the organisational level. Further, the study involves SMEs in western China which is an under-explored region.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 November 2018

Aminu Mamman, Christopher J. Rees, Rhoda Bakuwa, Mohamed Branine and Ken Kamoche

In recognising the weakness of trade unions and the lack of an institutional framework designed to enforce employee rights in an African context, the purpose of this paper…

Abstract

Purpose

In recognising the weakness of trade unions and the lack of an institutional framework designed to enforce employee rights in an African context, the purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which human resource (HR) practitioners are perceived to play the role of employee advocate.

Design/methodology/approach

The quantitative data set is derived from a sample of 305 respondents (95 HR practitioners, 121 line managers and 89 employees) from Malawi.

Findings

Despite the challenges of the context, HR practitioners are perceived by key stakeholders (including line managers and employees) to be playing the role of employee advocate. Standard multiple regression results indicate that the main factor contributing to the perception that HR practitioners are playing this role is their contribution to “motivating employees”.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in Malawi. Further research is necessary to explore the generalisability of the findings to other contexts.

Originality/value

The findings provide an empirical base for future studies which explore perceptions of the employee advocacy role undertaken by HR practitioners in Africa.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 August 2010

Christopher J. Rees and Hasanah Johari

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role played by the human resource management (HRM) function in strategic organizational change initiatives. The objectives of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role played by the human resource management (HRM) function in strategic organizational change initiatives. The objectives of the paper are to assess the extent to which the HRM function is perceived by senior managers to have contributed to the strategic organizational change agenda during a period of rapid change, and identify major challenges HRM professionals face as facilitators of strategic change management initiatives in contexts of this nature.

Design/methodology/approach

The research objectives were addressed using literature‐based evidence and primary interview data obtained from qualitative in‐depth interviews with the directors and deputy directors of a public sector banking institution in Malaysia.

Findings

In addition to identifying positive perceptions of the HRM function, the findings raise issues about the strategic focus, independence, credibility, and leadership strategies associated with the HR function's attempts to engage with strategic change initiatives. The findings also reveal the respondents' views about the extent to which HRM activities have or should have ethical, spiritual, and religious foci.

Practical implications

The implications of the research findings for HRM are discussed with reference to issues such as: the transfer of Western‐originating change management approaches to non‐Western settings; the need for organizational change outcomes (including wider societal objectives) to be delineated clearly with reference to organizational change initiatives; and the close association between ethics, spirituality, and HRM in certain Asian contexts.

Originality/value

The paper offers a valuable insight into the role of the HRM function in organizational change interventions with specific reference to the context of Malaysia.

Details

Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 2 April 2020

Daniel A. Diaz and Christopher J. Rees

The emergence of Governance practices in the non-governmental organisation (NGO) sector has become associated with increasingly high levels of organisational complexity…

Abstract

Purpose

The emergence of Governance practices in the non-governmental organisation (NGO) sector has become associated with increasingly high levels of organisational complexity. In the light of an expanding civil society sector in Chile and the emergence of formalised governance practices, this paper explores the construction of the Executive Director role in Chilean NGOs with reference to organisational functions, organisational dynamics, and external influences.

Design/methodology/approach

Grounded theory is used to explore qualitative data derived from a set of N = 39 interviews conducted in Chile These interviews involve NGO founders, funders, Executive Directors, scholars, consultants, and team members.

Findings

The findings reveal the pivotal role played by Executive Directors in conducting organisational activities which, in other types of organisations, are often distributed across various organisational functions. The data also highlight complex dynamics involving overt compliance with external regulatory requirements, uncertainties about financial sustainability, the recruitment of Executive Board members, the exercise of power by Executive Directors, and the influence of founders in leadership configurations.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of the study are discussed in relation to the governance and accountability of NGOs, the nature of the Executive Director role, the purpose of Executive Boards in the NGO sector, and the recruitment and training of Board members. It is noted that the study was conducted in the NGO sector in Chile; further research is necessary to establish the generalisability of the findings to other contexts.

Originality/value

This paper addresses the shortage of organisational research on NGOs. It contributes by offering analytical perspectives on organisational processes of Leadership and Governance. This paper highlights the relationship between, and interdependency of, those processes.

Details

Employee Relations: The International Journal, vol. 42 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2000

Christopher J. Rees and David Redfern

Acknowledges that the subject of occupational stress has become a major workplace issue. Suggests that employers may expect training and development specialists to play an…

Abstract

Acknowledges that the subject of occupational stress has become a major workplace issue. Suggests that employers may expect training and development specialists to play an increasingly prominent role in tackling stress within the workplace. Identifies a general lack of a consensus about the nature and causes of stress. Illustrates this point by investigating perceptions of occupational stress, as outlined in information dissemination by trade unions and employers’ organisations. Uses core HR activities to provide examples of how different perspectives of occupational stress can be identified. Highlights that training and development specialists can play an important role in ensuring that a balanced and eclectic approach to occupational stress is adopted in the workplace.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 17 July 2019

The review is based on "Employee advocacy in Africa: the role of HR practitioners in Malawi" by Aminu Mamman, Christopher J. Rees, Rhoda Bakuwa, Mohamed Branine, Ken…

Abstract

Purpose

The review is based on "Employee advocacy in Africa: the role of HR practitioners in Malawi" by Aminu Mamman, Christopher J. Rees, Rhoda Bakuwa, Mohamed Branine, Ken Kamoche, (2019) published in Employee Relations. This paper aims to concentrate on the degree that HR practitioners are considered as employee advocates within an African context.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were gathered from a questionnaire survey given to 305 respondents (95 HR practitioners, 121 line managers and 89 employees) working in private sector companies Malawi.

Findings

The results suggest that HR practitioners in Malawi are viewed as carrying out an employee advocate role by line managers, HR managers, and employees. HR managers perceived themselves to be carrying out the role of employee advocate more than line managers and employees. In addition, the strongest perceived element was their contribution to motivating employees.

Practical implications

Therefore, analysis of the importance of the elements that make up the employee advocate role could inform decisions on which elements to include in in an HR model. This paper has contributed to the literature on HR roles in developing countries and supports the use of Ulrich’s model beyond the developed countries where it originated

Originality/value

This paper has contributed to the literature on HR roles in developing countries and supports the use of Ulrich’s model beyond the developed countries where it originated.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Beverly Dawn Metcalfe and Christopher J. Rees

Current debates on neo‐liberal and universalistic globalization pay little attention to gender or to other marginalized groups, and fail to consider the complexity and…

Abstract

Purpose

Current debates on neo‐liberal and universalistic globalization pay little attention to gender or to other marginalized groups, and fail to consider the complexity and diversity of the experiences of men and women in specific socio‐political contexts, especially those in the developing world. The paper challenges mainstream theories which present globalization and its associated forces as gender neutral. The main purpose of this paper is to advance theoretical debates on the gendered organizing dynamics of globalization.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on organization theory, gender and development studies literature, and feminist sociology, to advance critical understandings of contemporary debates of the intersecting qualities of globalization, transnational organizations and gender social divisions.

Findings

The paper provides a critical synthesis of the complexity and interconnections between gender, organization and globalization. The paper identifies international development agencies; transnational corporations; international nongovernmental organizations and government state machineries as key stakeholders in the global and national regulation of employment and diversity issues. The paper outlines the organizing praxis of these key stakeholders, and stresses the need for all actors to engage in human rights awareness and equality consciousness raising.

Originality/value

The paper provides an original gendered organization analysis of globalization which reveals the specificity of global‐local linkages mediated by national states, international organizations, women's NGOs and gendered government machineries.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

1 – 10 of 203