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Article
Publication date: 9 February 2021

Solomon Arulraj David and Christopher Hill

Tertiary education has been going through dramatic transformation in recent times. Such transformation is seen in teaching and learning at tertiary education. This study…

Abstract

Purpose

Tertiary education has been going through dramatic transformation in recent times. Such transformation is seen in teaching and learning at tertiary education. This study, therefore, aims to understand the transformation of teaching and learning in tertiary-level education, particularly by accounting the experiences and perspectives of postgraduate learners.

Design/methodology/approach

The study narrowed higher education transformation into four key drivers such as expansion, excellence, extension, external and explored their dynamics and impacts for teaching and learning in tertiary education. The data was gathered from 25 doctoral students from three different cohorts, who shared their critical reflection on their experiences and perspectives on the transformation of teaching and learning in a reflective journal. The 25 reflective journals were used as the qualitative transcripts for analysis. Standard required ethical protocols were followed in the research. The results were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The findings indicate that teaching and learning in the higher education are transformed largely using technology, by engaging various stakeholders, several pedagogic methods, a range of assessments and numerous contents and materials. The findings suggest that higher education transformation has affected teaching and learning in tertiary education positively in the UAE, while identifying some relevant areas for improvement.

Research limitations/implications

Single data and small sample size (although suitable for the study) are the limitations. The experiences and perspectives of the postgraduate scholars on teaching and learning offer relevant insights for postgraduate learners, academic, researchers, curriculum developers, policymakers. The study asserts that accounting student's experiences and perspectives supports the understanding on the transformation of teaching and learning in tertiary education.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the ongoing debate on how students are helping shape teaching and learning practices in tertiary education, particularly from the UAE context using informed critical reflection. The study contends and concludes that teaching and learning in tertiary education are continued to be shaped by emerging trends and development.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 12 March 2018

Christopher Hill and Rawy Abdelrahman Thabet

International branch campuses (IBCs) are complex entities and while much has been written about their expansion and development, the literature is largely from an external…

Abstract

Purpose

International branch campuses (IBCs) are complex entities and while much has been written about their expansion and development, the literature is largely from an external perspective. There have been few longitudinal studies examining the development of an IBC over time. The purpose of this paper is to review the development of one IBC over an eight-year time period, to identify the key learning points for institutional managers of other IBCs or for institutions intending to establish an IBC.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is a culmination of research, conducted during the eight years when the lead author worked at the University of Nottingham Malaysia Campus (UNMC). The author was involved in practical management aspects as well as the research and analysis of IBC development. This paper represents a form of ethnographic research where the author conducted interviews, meetings and discussion groups, observed institutional policies, strategies and operations in action and was in an ideal position to identify and discuss their impacts on institutional performance.

Findings

This paper examines key management issues during the early, developing and evolving stages of an IBC and discusses key issues including communication, curriculum, identity and management. Key challenges, procedural issues, managerial responses and strategy will be presented to highlight foundational concerns for IBC development and areas and topics that must be given priority and support.

Originality/value

This paper considers the management of an IBC from the reflective standpoint of an author employed in a senior management position, during a period of significant growth of UNMC. The author provides insights and discussion involving practical experience.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Angela Yung Chi Hou, Christopher Hill, Karen Hui-Jung Chen, Sandy Tsai and Vivian Chen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the student mobility programs of the three initiatives – in Southeast Asian Ministers of Education Organization-Regional Institution of Higher Education and Development, University Mobility in Asia and Pacific (UMAP), and Campus Asia – and provide a comparative analysis of the respective programs in terms of the role of government, institutional involvement, quality assurance, and challenges. In addition, the paper will assess their impacts on higher education regionalization by regulatory models toward the end of the paper.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts qualitative document analysis as a major research method to explore the developmental models of three student mobility programs. Document analysis is an approach used to gather and review the content of existing written documentation related to the study in order to extract pieces of information in a rigorous and systematic manner.

Findings

ASEAN International Mobility for Students (AIMS), Collective Action for Mobility Program of University Student in Asia (CAMPUS Asia), and UMAP student mobility schemes have a shared purpose in higher education regionalization, but with different regulatory frameworks and Functional, Organizational, and Political approach models. AIMS and CAMPUS Asia as a strong network and government-led initiatives adopt a combination of functional, organizational, and political approaches; UMAP provides university-driven regional mobility programs with a hybridized force. However, all three of them face the same challenges at regional and national levels, such as different national regulation, coordination among participants, and implementation of credit transfer schemes.

Practical implications

The scale of three student mobility programs is still low, which results in limited impact on higher education regionalization in Asia. However, a stronger decision-making model and increased financial support to universities and students are desirable for the creation of a sustainable and effective network.

Originality/value

This is an original research and makes a great contribution to Asian nations.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 22 January 2019

Kee-Cheok Cheong, Christopher Hill, Yin-Ching Leong, Chen Zhang and Zheng Zhang

Using a Southeast Asian context, this paper asks a question that has seldom been researched: Is there a divergence between parents’ and their college-going children’s…

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Abstract

Purpose

Using a Southeast Asian context, this paper asks a question that has seldom been researched: Is there a divergence between parents’ and their college-going children’s perceptions of education and employability at a time of rapid economic change? If such a divergence exists, it would have hidden costs for the children. Parents’ choice of professions no longer in demand when their children reach working age can permanently damage the latter’s earning power. Also, parents’ choice of fields of study that their children are not proficient or interested in jeopardizes the latter’s chances of success in their studies. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using mixed methods, a combination of structured online questionnaires from two local special-purpose sample surveys conducted by the authors, and follow-up interviews. Graduate Employment Survey 2 (GES2) was the second of a three-phase British Council-sponsored study, focusing on TNE, that used a structured online questionnaire for students of several tertiary education institutions, both in the public and private sectors, and for several group interviews of students in 2015. A structured questionnaire was also administered to a small number of parents.

Findings

In terms of employment, the rankings of HEIs by parents and students were generally consistent. Study in foreign HEIs abroad has the highest likelihood of employment. Branch campuses were ranked next highest. Despite this, of interest is the difference in mean scores between first and second ranked HEIs. Whereas students rate branch campuses as not much inferior to foreign university campuses, parents see a major gulf between them – they rate foreign campuses more highly than branch campuses more poorly. This difference is likely caused by parents’ traditional preference for foreign study over local, coupled with a lack of TNE knowledge.

Social implications

A fundamental issue of perception is how parents and students see the role of education. Is education a destination or is education a journey? This disconnect has consequences. Given the shifting nature of employment, the need for transferable skills and the fact that some of the jobs that the next generation will be doing are not even known today, parental advice based on what they know may not do justice to their children’s choice of career. Likewise, the approach of TNE to promote traditional degrees to job paths is also a conventional approach that has a limited shelf life.

Originality/value

The role of parents in education choice has received surprisingly scant academic attention. With technological change driving product and service innovation ever more rapidly, previously unknown types of work have emerged in a relatively short span of time. In this situation, the risk of mismatched perceptions between parents and their children, whose educational experience spans a generation, is becoming increasingly real. While most studies of a parental role have been undertaken for Western countries, there is much less research on East Asian parents’ role in their children’s education.

Details

Higher Education Evaluation and Development, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-5789

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 1999

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29

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 25 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2020

Christopher Hill and Razan Bassam Nweiran

Transnational education (TNE) is evolving. It has moved from a necessity-driven model to a more balanced collaboration between host nation and sending institution. As a…

Abstract

Transnational education (TNE) is evolving. It has moved from a necessity-driven model to a more balanced collaboration between host nation and sending institution. As a result of this shift, the issue of sustainability looms large. As the sector has matured, the primary drive is no longer economic and as a result, integration and relevance to context are promoted and cultivated. Universities are looking for long-term engagement and, therefore, must choose partners wisely.

Sustainability for the long-term success of an institution in a host nation is often measured by the extent to which a higher education institution (HEI) can integrate and demonstrate value. This is perhaps most often demonstrated now by employability. In the face of shifting expectations, student debt, and graduate mobility, attention must be paid to relevance of learning and inherent value of degree. We still understand relatively little about the impact and legacy of TNE, or the role it can play in the employability agenda and this is at the heart of the sustainability debate in international higher education (HE).

The issue of access, while not solved for all, has perhaps been replaced in literature with impact, or indeed, legacy (McNamara & Knight, 2014). What is the value of international HE, and to whom? As institutions look to further their global reach, both as a response to shifting recruitment patterns and visa concerns and in order to pursue new funding opportunities and industry partners, a closer examination of university partnerships, both with other institutions and further afield, is required. New models provide new opportunities but are they simply more efficient and less costly ways of achieving the goal of student recruitment? The questions that should be asked are fundamentally why are universities engaging in international activity and who ultimately benefits?

This chapter will highlight key examples of sustainable partnership models. These cases will serve as a valuable resource for policy makers, universities, and HE practitioners. The chapter will explore examples from different countries and contexts, in order to identify core elements of a university partnership that promote, enhance, and support sustainability and do not rely on traditional models of fixed campus presence.

Details

University Partnerships for Sustainable Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-643-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

Magda El‐Sherbini

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon in human life. It existed during Biblical times when Joseph, the seventeen‐year‐old son of Jacob, was kidnapped and sold into slavery by…

Abstract

Terrorism is not a new phenomenon in human life. It existed during Biblical times when Joseph, the seventeen‐year‐old son of Jacob, was kidnapped and sold into slavery by his jealous brothers. Although terrorists have been active throughout history, it is only recently that we have seen an increase in scholarly interest in the phenomenon of terrorism. One reason for this is the fact that terrorist activities have increased dramatically since the 1960s. Everyday we read in the newspapers and hear on radio and television details of the latest terrorist outrage. Many American colleges and universities now offer a course or two on terrorism as a part of their curriculum.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1997

Nick Rich and Peter Hines

Develops the concept of time‐based competitive strategies within the context of supply‐chain management. Explores the current interest in supplier integration as a source…

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6722

Abstract

Develops the concept of time‐based competitive strategies within the context of supply‐chain management. Explores the current interest in supplier integration as a source of competitive advantage in consumer markets and proposes that the Japanese influenced network sourcing model provides a method whereby the advantages of vertical integration can be achieved without reducing the flexibility of product and material outsourcing. A central feature of the network sourcing approach is the use of supplier co‐ordination and development, facilitated by a supplier forum known as a supplier association. These associations represent a series of linking pins, extending from the focal purchasing organization, whereby the joint determination of supply chain improvements can be formulated and shared between a focal customer organization and entire groups of suppliers. Argues that the successful exploitation of these associations is a major pillar in developing and sustaining continuous improvement on a supply‐chain scale, where the efforts of each and every supplier are aligned to the changing requirements of the consumer market.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 27 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1978

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the…

Abstract

The Equal Pay Act 1970 (which came into operation on 29 December 1975) provides for an “equality clause” to be written into all contracts of employment. S.1(2) (a) of the 1970 Act (which has been amended by the Sex Discrimination Act 1975) provides:

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1976

R. Gregson

Consideration of logistics, or distribution, operations in their total corporate context usually involves too complex an analysis for use in everyday decision making…

Abstract

Consideration of logistics, or distribution, operations in their total corporate context usually involves too complex an analysis for use in everyday decision making. During a research programme recently carried out amongst pharmaceutical manufacturing companies, a set of rules was developed as an aid to decision making, which would simplify such an analysis. The details of this step forward in formalised decision making for logistics management are set out in a two‐part article, the first of which appears here.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

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