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Article
Publication date: 8 October 2018

Anna Marie Johnson, Amber Willenborg, Christopher Heckman, Joshua Whitacre, Latisha Reynolds, Elizabeth Alison Sterner, Lindsay Harmon, Syann Lunsford and Sarah Drerup

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present recently published resources on information literacy and library instruction through an extensive annotated bibliography of publications covering all library types.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2017 in over 200 journals, magazines, books and other sources.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description for all 590 sources.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 46 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 12 November 2012

Solomon W. Polachek and Konstantinos Tatsiramos

The first Research in Labor Economics (RLE) volume was published in 1977. Its founding editor, Ronald Ehrenberg, saw the need for high quality substantive research papers…

Abstract

The first Research in Labor Economics (RLE) volume was published in 1977. Its founding editor, Ronald Ehrenberg, saw the need for high quality substantive research papers in the labor/human resource area. Each volume was to contain “original contributions comparable (or exceeding) those found in leading journals.” The articles were of three genres: (1) results from ongoing or completed important research endeavors, (2) critical survey articles, and (3) symposia on policy related topics (RLE, Vol. 1, p. vii). In 1995, Solomon Polachek took over as series editor. Beginning in 2007 RLE affiliated with the Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), an international network of about 1,100 labor economists spanning more than 40 countries. Konstantinos Tatsiramos became the IZA coeditor in 2008 after taking over from Olivier Bargain. Finally in 2011 RLE established an editorial board consisting of Orley C. Ashenfelter, Francine D. Blau, Richard Blundell, David Card, Ronald G. Ehrenberg, Richard B. Freeman, Daniel S. Hamermesh, James J. Heckman, Alan B. Krueger, Edward P. Lazear, Christopher A. Pissarides, and Klaus F. Zimmermann. Two are Nobel Laureates and all are top labor economists.

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35th Anniversary Retrospective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-219-6

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Article
Publication date: 20 January 2021

Wittawat Hemtanon and Christopher Gan

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of microfinance programs on the income and food expenditure of farm and nonfarm households in Thailand.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the impact of microfinance programs on the income and food expenditure of farm and nonfarm households in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs secondary data from the Thai Socioeconomic Survey (cross-sectional data from 2017 and panel data from 2012 to 2017). The cross-sectional data (2017) include 43,210 households. Panel data from the 2012 and 2017 Socioeconomic surveys (SES surveys) include 4,406 households. The estimation methods include propensity score matching (PSM) and a fixed effect (FE) model.

Findings

The result shows that village funds (VFs) have a significant negative impact on income and food expenditure for both farm and nonfarm households. The empirical results reveal that the saving groups for production (SGPs) effects are positively significant in terms of income and food expenditure, but only for farm households. The FE model result also shows that while VFs have a negative impact on income they have a positive impact on food expenditure for farm households. In contrast, SPGs have no impact on both farm and nonfarm households' income and food expenditure.

Practical implications

Farm and nonfarm households require both welfare and microfinance programs. Microfinance programs can only help these households once they have the necessary education. The government should provide social programs and business skills for these households; completion of these courses should be a pre-requisite for accessing microfinance programs.

Originality/value

This study is unique because it reveals the microfinance impact between VFs and SGPs programs so that most low-income and poor people in Thailand can access basic financial services.

Details

Agricultural Finance Review, vol. 81 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-1466

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Book part
Publication date: 19 December 2012

Randall C. Campbell and Asli Ogunc

Advances in Econometrics is a series of research annuals first published in 1982 by JAI Press. In this paper, we present a brief history of the series over its first 30…

Abstract

Advances in Econometrics is a series of research annuals first published in 1982 by JAI Press. In this paper, we present a brief history of the series over its first 30 years. We describe key events in the history of the volume, and give information about the key contributors: editors, editorial board members, Advances in Econometrics Fellows, and authors who have contributed to the great success of the series.

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30th Anniversary Edition
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-309-4

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Book part
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Mike Vuolo, Christopher Uggen and Sarah Lageson

This paper tests whether employers responded particularly negatively to African American job applicants during the deep U.S. recession that began in 2007. Theories of…

Abstract

This paper tests whether employers responded particularly negatively to African American job applicants during the deep U.S. recession that began in 2007. Theories of labor queuing and social closure posit that members of privileged groups will act to minimize labor market competition in times of economic turbulence, which could advantage Whites relative to African Americans. Although social closure should be weakest in the less desirable, low-wage job market, it may extend downward during recessions, pushing minority groups further down the labor queue and exacerbating racial inequalities in hiring. We consider two complementary data sources: (1) a field experiment with a randomized block design and (2) the nationally representative NLSY97 sample. Contrary to expectations, both analyses reveal a comparable recession-based decline in job prospects for White and African American male applicants, implying that hiring managers did not adapt new forms of social closure and demonstrating the durability of inequality even in times of structural change. Despite this proportionate drop, however, the recession left African Americans in an extremely disadvantaged position. Whites during the recession obtained favorable responses from employers at rates similar to African Americans prior to the recession. The combination of experimental methods and nationally representative longitudinal data yields strong evidence on how race and recession affect job prospects in the low-wage labor market.

Details

Emerging Conceptions of Work, Management and the Labor Market
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-459-0

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Article
Publication date: 17 September 2018

Christopher Groening

This paper aims to use the passage of the Italian Gender Diversity Law to help isolate the effects of board gender diversity on firm value by investigating conditions…

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1092

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to use the passage of the Italian Gender Diversity Law to help isolate the effects of board gender diversity on firm value by investigating conditions under which such diversity provides greater role-enhancing resources to the board.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper used a one-day event study to measure when gender diversity matters to investors. Abnormal returns from Italian firms were used to study investors’ anticipated outcomes of the effect of gender diversity on firm value.

Findings

Board gender diversity is financially beneficial especially for firms with a male dual CEO and board chair and with few or no women on board committees and firms that operate in industries with greater levels of competition. Addition of these moderators more than doubles the variance explained. Moreover, the effect of gender is isolated in this study, which examined investor reaction to the expectation of increases in the number of female board members, rather than to specific female appointees.

Social implications

Determining the conditions when a gender diverse matters to firm value is important for shareholders, policymakers and advocates for gender equality. The findings illustrate precise conditions for stakeholders to make the case for board gender diversity as achieving financial reward, in addition to societal benefit.

Originality/value

The value of a gender diverse board is contingent on the company’s need for diverse resources (e.g. more competition, lack of gender diversity on committees or CEO duality). This paper provides insight as to why prior research linking board gender diversity to firm value finds seemingly contradictory results. Thus, this paper provides useful insights for researchers, boards and legislative bodies.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2020

Steven DeSimone and Kevin Rich

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors associated with the presence and use of internal audit functions (IAFs) at US colleges and universities, as well as their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify factors associated with the presence and use of internal audit functions (IAFs) at US colleges and universities, as well as their relationship with financial reporting quality and federal grant outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a combination of publicly available and manually collected data, this paper uses a two-stage model to examine both the factors associated with the use of IAFs within US institutions of higher education and the consequences therein.

Findings

Results indicate that institutions with larger enrollments and endowments, those that receive public funding and those that have an audit committee are more likely to maintain an IAF. Findings also suggest that the presence of an IAF is negatively associated with reported material weaknesses for major programs at significant levels. Finally, the presence of an IAF is found to have a positive and significant association with federal grants received by the institution, with an even stronger association for IAFs that perform grant-specific procedures.

Originality/value

The study’s findings provide the first large-sample quantitative insights on IAF work within US colleges and universities. Results should be of interest to college/university leadership as they attempt to improve financial reporting quality and grant outcomes, as well as external stakeholders looking to evaluate whether institutions are acting as good stewards over resources. Additionally, the Institute of Internal Auditors may find the results helpful when promoting the profession.

Details

Managerial Auditing Journal, vol. 35 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-6902

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

Yaw A. Badu, Kenneth N. Daniels and Francis Amagoh

Explains the rating system for US municipal bonds and its effect on borrowing costs, reviews relevant research and provides a study of the factors affecting grading by…

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753

Abstract

Explains the rating system for US municipal bonds and its effect on borrowing costs, reviews relevant research and provides a study of the factors affecting grading by rating agencies in Virginia using 1995 data. Explains the methodology and presents the results, which identify five significant determinants of favourable ratings. Shows that net interest costs are lower when other rates of interest are low, real estate taxes are high (though not excessive), total municipal debt levels are low and credit risks are low. Confirms that bond ratings capture additional information and that a drop in ratings will raise net interest costs substantially. Considers consistency with other research and the implications of the findings for participants in the municipal bond market.

Details

Managerial Finance, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4358

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2020

Xiao-xia Wang, Hai-ying Pan and Kun-kun Xue

This study aims to examine the relationship between an ownership structure with multiple large shareholders and corporate social responsibility (CSR) with regard to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between an ownership structure with multiple large shareholders and corporate social responsibility (CSR) with regard to Chinese-listed companies.

Design/methodology/approach

Multiple regression analysis was used on 4,940 samples of 884 listed companies in China for the period 2009–2017, to empirically test the influence of an ownership structure on enterprises’ fulfillment of social responsibility. Moreover, the propensity score matching–difference in differences and Heckman two-stage approaches were used for the robustness of the regression results.

Findings

The results show that ownership structures with multiple large shareholders can promote social responsibility. The check-and-balance ability of non-controlling large shareholders, corporate information transparency and corporate system environment moderate the relationship between multiple large shareholders and CSR engagement.

Originality/value

This paper complements prior studies on the ownership structure of multiple large shareholders. The findings enrich the literature on corporate governance and CSR. The results also reveal information about the situational factors, helping identify the mechanism through which the ownership structure of multiple large shareholders affects CSR.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 20 May 2017

Dean R. Lillard

I investigate the well-known educational gradient in smoking. It is well established that, at least in recent decades, people with higher levels of education are less…

Abstract

I investigate the well-known educational gradient in smoking. It is well established that, at least in recent decades, people with higher levels of education are less likely to smoke and, conditional on being a smoker, are more likely to quit than are people with less education. Using longitudinal data on lifetime smoking histories, I explore whether the educational gradient changes when one accounts for differences in the amount of information smokers have about the health risks associated with smoking. At the core of the analysis is a new way to measure not only the flow of information a person receives but also a person’s stock of information in any year. I construct measures of the stock and flow of information with consumer magazine articles that discuss cigarette smoking and health. To calculate exposure, I predict individuals’ reading of particular magazines and link predicted exposure to data on individual smoking status in every year of life. The analysis sample includes many individuals who started smoking in the 1930s and 1940s – well before scientific evidence had accumulated. After replicating the education gradient in terms of smoking cessation, I show that it is mostly explained by the interaction between educational attainment and the stock of knowledge individuals possess. The findings suggest that education affects whether and how a stock of health risk information induces people to quit smoking.

Details

Human Capital and Health Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-466-2

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