Search results

1 – 10 of 264
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 June 2018

Christopher Dick

The few studies on the effects of a sponsorship termination do not consider the effects of different exit options on consumers’ attitudes toward the exiting sponsor. To…

Abstract

Purpose

The few studies on the effects of a sponsorship termination do not consider the effects of different exit options on consumers’ attitudes toward the exiting sponsor. To fill this gap, the purpose of this paper is to investigate the effects of the extent of the exit (gradual vs entire) as well as the timing of the announcement (early vs late) on consumers’ attitudes. Moreover, this research considers the mediating role of the perceived abandonment of the sponsored party.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses an experimental study (n=204). Data were collected among supporters of a German second division soccer team.

Findings

The results emphasize that the extent of the exit as well as the timing of the announcement influences consumers’ attitudes. They develop negative attitudes toward the withdrawing sponsor, especially when the sponsor exits entirely instead of gradually and announces the decision late instead of early. Furthermore, the results reveal that the perceived abandonment of the sponsored party mediates the effect of the extent of exit on attitudes.

Practical implications

The results help to formulate several exit options for the withdrawing sponsor that will help to minimize the possible negative effects on their brand. Specifically, the author recommends a gradual exit as well as an early announcement of the decision to prevent negative effects on the sponsor brand.

Originality/value

This study expands the research on the effects of a sponsorship termination on consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand. Specifically, it is the first study that considers several aspects regarding the sponsor management of a sponsorship termination as important determinants of consumers’ attitudes.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 August 2019

Christopher Dick

To date, research on sponsorship considers the effects of only positive or only negative sponsorship information on consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand. However…

Abstract

Purpose

To date, research on sponsorship considers the effects of only positive or only negative sponsorship information on consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand. However, in practice, sometimes mixed information (positive and negative) is available that influences consumers’ sponsor evaluations. To mirror the information situation of the real world, the purpose of this paper is to investigate how the valence of sponsorship information (only positive vs mixed vs only negative) and the strength of sponsorship information (weak vs strong) influence the consumers’ attitudes toward the sponsor brand.

Design/methodology/approach

This research uses an experimental research design (n=210). Data were collected among students of a German university.

Findings

The results reveal that when the strength of information was weak, attitudes in the mixed information condition were not significantly worse than in the only positive condition and significantly better than in the only negative condition. In addition, when the strength of information was strong, attitudes in the mixed information condition were significantly worse than in the only positive condition and significantly better than in the only negative condition.

Practical implications

This study offers several practical recommendations regarding the sponsors’ evaluation of their investments and the decision to maintain or exit the sponsorship of a controversial object.

Originality/value

This study expands the research on the effects of available sponsorship information on consumers’ sponsor evaluation. The present research highlights the effects of different types of sponsorship information on consumers’ attitudes and considers the strength of information as a boundary condition of these effects.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1989

Mr Ted Bray has recently been appointed as quality assurance manager for Ion Deposition Ltd of Corby, who operate the specialist vacuum deposition coating service for the…

Abstract

Mr Ted Bray has recently been appointed as quality assurance manager for Ion Deposition Ltd of Corby, who operate the specialist vacuum deposition coating service for the aerospace, defence, automotive and general engineering industries.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 61 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 1934

Frederick Niven

The Editor of Library Review has invited me to write an article on my literary beginnings. It is a task at one and the same time happy and—well, if not sad it does make…

Abstract

The Editor of Library Review has invited me to write an article on my literary beginnings. It is a task at one and the same time happy and—well, if not sad it does make one aware of how “the sunrise blooms and withers on the hill.” I might best begin with the return of my people from South America to Glasgow (beloved by them) where, I recall, I was long homesick for the land of my birth. Charles Darwin, visiting my native country, Chile, was impressed chiefly by its sunshine, the visibility there, the keen clarity of its atmosphere. Though in time I learned to love Glasgow it seemed, in comparison, smoky.

Details

Library Review, vol. 4 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 20 January 2017

George (Yiorgos) Allayannis and Christopher Brandriff

This case examines the causes and consequences of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy during one of the most fascinating weekends in financial history. It's about the…

Abstract

This case examines the causes and consequences of the Lehman Brothers bankruptcy during one of the most fascinating weekends in financial history. It's about the commercial paper market, a major funding market served by Lehman Brothers, and the events that led to “breaking the buck” on money market funds. It also examines the CDS market where Lehman was such a big player, the potential impact that CDSs had on the crisis, and the notion and validity of the too-big-to-fail hypothesis.

Details

Darden Business Publishing Cases, vol. no.
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2474-7890
Published by: University of Virginia Darden School Foundation

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Vincent Geloso and Michael Hinton

We construct a new consumer price index for Canada covering the period from 1870 to 1900. Unlike previous indexes, it includes prices of clothing and household…

Abstract

We construct a new consumer price index for Canada covering the period from 1870 to 1900. Unlike previous indexes, it includes prices of clothing and household furnishings. This is important because these previously neglected components accounted for roughly 20% of consumers' expenditures. Moreover, the price of cotton goods, the most important textile product used for clothing and household furnishings, fell by half between 1870 and 1900 (much faster than other components of the price level). This has ramifications for both the level and trend of Canadian GDP. Because the largest changes in estimation concern the 1870s, we show that the country grew substantially faster than generally believed. It outpaced the United States so much that it entered the twentieth century with an improved economic standing relative to its southern neighbor.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 8 June 2020

Patrick Vernon

Since the demise of Delivering Race Equality strategy in 2010 under the last Labour government and with the Coalition (2010–2015), and now the Conservative government at…

Abstract

Since the demise of Delivering Race Equality strategy in 2010 under the last Labour government and with the Coalition (2010–2015), and now the Conservative government at times have adopted a “color blind” approach to race and health. This raises the fundamental question why is race equality off the political agenda and how black mental health issues can be part of a future strategy. The 2015 Care Quality Commission (CQC) annual monitoring report of the Mental Health Act (MHA; which has also incorporated the learning since the inception of the Act in 1985) further highlighted the overrepresentation of African and Caribbean men and women who are sectioned in secure wards or on Community Treatment Order (CTO) in the psychiatric system over the last 30 years. The CQC have revised the code of practice which recognizes issues around race equality as part of wider perspectives and principles of human rights.

In October 2017, the government established an independent review of the 2007 MHA as a way of providing more safeguards for patients and service users. The review, under the leadership of Sir Simon Wessely which is reported in 2018, provided an opportunity for an informed public debate on the historical and contemporary roles of psychiatry and the experiences of mental health in Britain’s African and Caribbean communities. The review did examine community anxieties about the proportionally larger numbers of black ethnic minorities receiving inpatient care and CTOs, or in the criminal justice system. However, after 30 years of Black History Month in the UK, we still need to ask the question: Are those of African descent overrepresented in these systems? If so, is serious mental illness over diagnosed among these groups due to the persistence of stereotypes rooted in the experiences of slavery, or do they in fact experience distinctive patterns of mental health and illness, perhaps due to the wider fallout of historical enslavem

Details

The International Handbook of Black Community Mental Health
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-965-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Jennifer Rowley

To propose a categorisation of customer loyalty types to further increase our understanding of the nature of loyalty.

Downloads
38051

Abstract

Purpose

To propose a categorisation of customer loyalty types to further increase our understanding of the nature of loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

By segmenting customers who are both loyal in attitude and behaviour to a brand, a model is proposed that differentiates between customers whose loyalty is inertial, and those whose loyalty is positive.

Findings

Four categories of loyal customer are proposed: captive, convenience‐seekers, contented and committed. The behaviours and attitudes that can be expected of customers in these different categories are discussed. It is also suggested that customers in different categories will respond in different ways to triggers to switching. Further research that investigates customers' reasons for loyalty behaviour in relation to a portfolio of brands is recommended to validate the model and to enhance understanding and predictability of customer loyalty propensities.

Originality/value

There is agreement that loyals are important for the future of the business, and that this category is deserving of special attention. Since loyalty is key in customer development and profitability, it is important to understand the loyalty condition in more detail, and to use this understanding to develop further the relationship with customers in the loyal category. The model proposed here subdivides loyals in Dick and Basu's categorisation based on behaviour and attitudes. Four categories of loyalty are proposed: captive, contented, convenience‐seeker and committed. Each is described and discussed, and their management implications and research agendas identified. It is noted that any one individual is likely to exhibit the characteristics of each of these categories in relation to different products, services, outlets, and their associated brands. This is a speculative model at this stage of development, which is intended to provoke further thought about the nature of loyalty.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Ghizlane Arifine, Reto Felix and Olivier Furrer

Although multi-brand loyalty (MBL) in consumer markets has been identified in previous brand loyalty research, empirical studies have not yet explored the facets of its…

Downloads
1591

Abstract

Purpose

Although multi-brand loyalty (MBL) in consumer markets has been identified in previous brand loyalty research, empirical studies have not yet explored the facets of its different types. This paper aims to have a deeper understanding of MBL by investigating its different types and facets.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a sequential, qualitatively driven mixed-method design consisting of in-depth interviews and supplementary survey research.

Findings

The findings of this study suggest that mood congruence, identity enhancement, unavailability risk reduction and market competition are the most important facets that explains the two types of MBL (complementary-based and product substitutes). Furthermore, the findings show that the family factor can motivate consumers to be multi-brand loyal by adding brands to an initially family-endorsed brand.

Research limitations/implications

This study advances the conceptual foundations of MBL and extends previous research on brand loyalty. Some of the findings may be limited to the economic and cultural context of relatively affluent countries with an abundance of market offers.

Practical implications

Marketing managers gain insights into how to manage brand loyalty and how to transition from MBL to single-brand loyalty.

Originality/value

The study generates novel insights into the facets of different types of MBL.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 September 2020

Lee B. Wilson

Historians have long understood that transforming people into property was the defining characteristic of Atlantic World slavery. This chapter examines litigation in

Abstract

Historians have long understood that transforming people into property was the defining characteristic of Atlantic World slavery. This chapter examines litigation in British colonial Vice Admiralty Courts in order to show how English legal categories and procedures facilitated this process of dehumanization. In colonies where people were classified as chattel property, litigants transformed local Vice Admiralty Courts into slave courts by analogizing human beings to ships and cargo. Doing so made sound economic sense from their perspective; it gave colonists instant access to an early modern English legal system that was centered on procedures and categories. But for people of African descent, it had decidedly negative consequences. Indeed, when colonists treated slaves as property, they helped to create a world in which Africans were not just like things, they were things. Through the very act of categorization, they rendered factual what had been a mere supposition: that Africans were less than human.

Details

Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-297-1

Keywords

1 – 10 of 264