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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Christopher C.A. Chan, Cecil Pearson and Lanny Entrekin

The effectiveness of using team learning to improve team performance has been well documented in the literature, and this notion makes intuitive sense. However, little…

Abstract

The effectiveness of using team learning to improve team performance has been well documented in the literature, and this notion makes intuitive sense. However, little empirical research has been dedicated to the relationship between team learning and team performance, probably owing to the lack of a widely acceptable instrument for assessing team learning. In this study, a psychometric (validity and reliability) examination of Edmondson’s Team Learning Survey (TLS) is undertaken. This instrument was then used to examine the effects of internal and external team learning on team performance. Implications and limitations of the study findings are discussed.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 9 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Christopher C.A. Chan, Lynn Lim and Siew Kuan Keasberry

Despite a plethora of studies purporting that learning could occur at the individual, team and organizational levels, there is still a lack of reported empirical evidence…

Abstract

Despite a plethora of studies purporting that learning could occur at the individual, team and organizational levels, there is still a lack of reported empirical evidence on these linkages. Accordingly, these theoretical assumptions will be tested with empirical evidences in this study. Interestingly and contrary to the literature, individual learning was not significantly related to organizational learning. Internal team learning (learning within teams) was partially related to organizational learning, and external team learning (cross‐functional team learning) was significantly related to organizational learning. Organizational learning was conceptualized and tested as a three‐factor variable that consists of commitment to learning, shared vision, and open‐mindedness. A discussion of the results is provided.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2007

Christopher C.A. Chan

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2006

Christopher C.A. Chan

Abstract

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2003

Christopher C.A. Chan

Abstract

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Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Christopher C.A. Chan

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Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 12 September 2008

Janet Chew and Christopher C.A. Chan

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of key human resource (HR) practices on permanent employees' organizational commitment and intention to stay. These…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the impacts of key human resource (HR) practices on permanent employees' organizational commitment and intention to stay. These practices include facilitating of person‐organization fit (P‐O fit), designing effective remuneration and recognition, creating sufficiently challenging assignments, and implementing training and career development.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was carried out in three phases. First, 13 experts (e.g. academics, HR managers and organizational psychologists) were interviewed using the Delphi technique. Second, in‐depth interviews with 12 HR managers were conducted. Third, 457 employees from nine Australian organizations responded to a survey. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Organizational commitment was positively affected by P‐O fit, remuneration, recognition, and an opportunity to undertake challenging employment assignments. Intention to stay was significantly related to P‐O fit, remuneration, recognition, training and career development. Surprisingly, training and career development was not significantly related to organizational commitment and challenging assignment was not significantly related to intention to stay.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing knowledge by testing HR practices in large public and private Australian organizations, which are impacted by demographic changes, increasing dependence on outsourcing, and industrial relations reforms. Thus, the results of this study will provide practitioners with better insights into some practices that could elevate organizational commitment and retention of employees.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 29 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Christopher C.A. Chan and Cecil A.L. Pearson

A need to facilitate effective international business encounters, which are underpinned by the personal values of managers, has led to significant pragmatic interest in…

Abstract

A need to facilitate effective international business encounters, which are underpinned by the personal values of managers, has led to significant pragmatic interest in understanding work goals cross‐culturally. This study examines the work goals of 468 managers from the three industrializing nations of Brunei, Malaysia and Singapore. The results reveal some consensuses as well as differences in managerial work goals. The three dominant work goals included opportunity to learn, interesting work and good match with abilities and experience. Implications for the findings are discussed.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 21 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Christopher C.A. Chan

Abstract

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Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Christopher C.A. Chan

Abstract

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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