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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Woo-Young Lee, Youngjin Hur, Dae Yeon Kim and Christopher Brigham

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of congruity and endorsement on consumer attitudes toward sports website advertisements (Aad), the advertising brand…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of congruity and endorsement on consumer attitudes toward sports website advertisements (Aad), the advertising brand (Abr), and consumers’ future intentions (FI).

Design/methodology/approach

The current study followed a 2×3 between-subjects experimental design. Sports celebrity (or the presence or absence of a sports celebrity in a banner ad) and the level of congruity between the website and banner ad (high congruity – soccer, medium congruity – snowboard, and low congruity – computer) were the primary independent variables. Data were collected in two stages. An initial pilot study (n=40) established the reliability and validity of the scaled measures guiding this test. The second phase of data collection, the main study, was conducted over a five-day period. A random assignment of treatment conditions (i.e. exposure to one of six banner ad manipulations) was followed by a series of short surveys designed to measure the dependent variables of subjects’ cognitive ad responses (i.e. Aad, Abr, and FI).

Findings

The results indicated that participants who viewed the ad with the endorsement showed a more positive Aad than those who viewed the ad without it. The participants with a high congruity condition reported a more positive Abr and higher FI than those with low or medium congruity.

Originality/value

This study extends the application of congruity theory to banner advertisements, thereby aiding our understanding of consumers’ perceptions of advertising.

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2004

Christopher B. Meek

Over 30 years, many comparative surveys have found Japanese employees and managers far less satisfied with their jobs than their Western counterparts. This paper explores…

Abstract

Over 30 years, many comparative surveys have found Japanese employees and managers far less satisfied with their jobs than their Western counterparts. This paper explores the findings and interpretations from these studies, and then proposes an alternative explanation based on childhood socialization practices and the history of Japanese society. This explanation is then used to illuminate the recent social problems of karoshi (death from overwork) and ijime (bullying) in the Japanese workplaces.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2014

Salvael Ortega, Nathan Furr, Erin Liman and Caleb Flint

Rather than spend an inordinate amount of time and resources on planning what is inherently unknown and uncertain, socially-focused organizations like Panera Cares, Banco…

Abstract

Rather than spend an inordinate amount of time and resources on planning what is inherently unknown and uncertain, socially-focused organizations like Panera Cares, Banco Davivienda, and Brigham Young University's (BYU) Design Exploration lab quickly map out their assumptions, run experiments to test those assumptions, and adjust their plans based on their learnings. In this article, we explain and expand on how organizations of all kinds (whether they be large corporations, social ventures, or government agencies) have bought into the idea of using innovation and experimentation for impact; and how despite recent advancements of design thinking on the social impact front, the actual implementation of innovative ideas remains elusive for many organizations. The article further presents a more systemic model for social impact innovation: social impact models, which provide one possible solution by enabling social ventures to achieve a more robust validation of their new- and not-so-new-to-the-world ideas by mapping and strategies by mapping out each assumption and iteratively testing them in the field. With this article, the authors seek to provide a practical process for how to apply the model, and how to avoid the most common illusory validation traps, which together would allow socially-focused organizations to more frequently succeed and deliver more impact with their endeavors.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Robert D. Ridge, Brooke E. Dresden, Felicia L. Farley and Christopher E. Hawk

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of reconciliation and retaliation story endings on subsequent aggressive affect and behavior.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of reconciliation and retaliation story endings on subsequent aggressive affect and behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants took part in two ostensibly unrelated studies. The first involved reading a violent story, attributed to a biblical or secular source, which ended in either brutal retaliation or peaceful reconciliation. They then took part in a second study in which they completed measures of aggressive affect and behavior.

Findings

Participants told that their stories came from a secular source experienced a more aggressive affect than those told that their stories came from a biblical source. In terms of behavioral aggression, a significant difference in effect of the story ending on males and females emerged. Females who read the reconciliation ending had lower levels of behavioral aggression than females who read the retaliation ending. Conversely, males who read the reconciliation ending had higher levels of behavioral aggression than males who read the retaliation ending.

Research limitations/implications

These findings suggest that media depictions of prosocial reactions to unprovoked aggression may not reduce aggression in men.

Practical implications

Results are discussed in terms of moral values espoused by women and men and suggest that anti-violence messages may be strengthened to the extent they address the values important to both.

Originality/value

This study extends research on violent media exposure to a burgeoning literature on reading violent content.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Ribeka Takahashi, David T. Fullwood, Travis M. Rampton, Darrell J. Skousen, Brent L. Adams and Christopher A. Mattson

Microstructure-sensitive design (MSD), for optimal performance of engineering components that are sensitive to material anisotropy, has largely been confined to the realm…

Abstract

Purpose

Microstructure-sensitive design (MSD), for optimal performance of engineering components that are sensitive to material anisotropy, has largely been confined to the realm of theory. The purpose of this paper is to insert the MSD framework into a finite element environment in order to arrive at a practical tool for improved selection and design of materials for critical engineering situations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies the recently developed Hybrid Bishop-Hill (HBH) model to map the yield surface of anisotropic oxygen free electronic copper. Combining this information with the detailed local stresses determined via finite element analysis (FEA), a “configurational yield stress” is determined for the entire component. By varying the material choice/processing conditions and selecting the directionality of anisotropy, an optimal configuration is found.

Findings

The paper provides a new FEA-based framework for MSD for yield-limited situations. The approach identified optimal directionality and processing configurations for three engineering situations that are particularly sensitive to material anisotropy.

Research limitations/implications

The microstructure design space for this study is limited to a selection of eight copper materials produced by a range of processing methods, but is generalizable to many materials that exhibit anisotropic behavior.

Originality/value

The introduction of MSD methodology into a finite element environment is a first step toward a comprehensive designer toolkit for exploiting the anisotropy of general materials (such as metals) in a way that is routinely undertaken in the world of fiber-based composite materials. While the gains are not as sizeable (due to the less-extreme anisotropy), in many applications they may be extremely important.

Details

Engineering Computations, vol. 32 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-4401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Christopher Wilson and Devin Knighton

This study aims to examine the effect of publics' legitimacy evaluations on Arthur W. Page's conceptualization of “reasonable freedom of action” by breaking it into two…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the effect of publics' legitimacy evaluations on Arthur W. Page's conceptualization of “reasonable freedom of action” by breaking it into two parts: (1) perceived organizational autonomy and (2) trust in the organization.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted an online experiment using a 2 (legitimacy: low, high) × 2 (legitimacy type: institutional, actional) between-subjects design. Measured variables included perceived organizational autonomy and trust.

Findings

Organizations acting in their own self-interest while ignoring community norms and expectations were perceived to be exercising higher levels of organizational autonomy and have lower levels of trust. The interaction between legitimacy type and level had an effect on perceived organizational autonomy and trust.

Research limitations/implications

Public's view their relationships with organizations from a perspective that prioritizes responsibility and conformity to community norms and expectations. Also, organizations have more to lose by acting in their own self-interest to resolve institutional legitimacy concerns and more to gain by handling them in a way that includes the public interest than when they are managing an actional legitimacy situation.

Practical implications

Societal norms, values and beliefs, which may have accommodated, or even supported, an organization's approach to doing business in the past, can change over time, calling into question an organization's legitimacy and its ability to operate in the public interest. As a result, organizational leaders need the Chief Communication Officer to help them understand current societal norms, values and beliefs.

Originality/value

This study addresses a core assumption of the organization–public relationship paradigm that has not yet been studied empirically. It also expands the understanding of organizational autonomy from a public perspective and examines the effect of legitimacy on organizational autonomy and trust.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 January 2010

Abstract

Details

Current Issues and Trends in Special Education: Identification, Assessment and Instruction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-669-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Christopher Wilson

The purpose of this paper is to understand the extent to which dominant coalition members’ values and perceptions influence their perceptions of public relations…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the extent to which dominant coalition members’ values and perceptions influence their perceptions of public relations participation in organization-level decision making. Research in this area has largely focussed on the relationship between practitioner roles and decision-making inclusion.

Design/methodology/approach

The population of interest was dominant coalition members of for-profit, government, and nonprofit organizations in the USA. Data were collected through a national survey to a nonrandom sample of 201 dominant coalition members.

Findings

Results indicate that dominant coalition members’ values of organizational openness to the environment and perceived substantive autonomy of the organization positively predicted perceptions of public relations participation in organizational decision making. Perceived manager role potential of the public relations department also had significant predictive power.

Originality/value

While research has focussed primarily on the characteristics that public relations practitioners can develop to earn a seat at the management table, little is known about the characteristics of dominant coalition members that influence whether or not a seat is made available or the degree to which public relations is perceived to participate in decision making.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 5 December 2014

Abstract

Details

Inquiry-Based Learning for the Arts, Humanities, and Social Sciences: A Conceptual and Practical Resource for Educators
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-236-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Peter O'Neill, Annibal José Scavarda and Zhenhua Yang

This research seeks to undertake a comparative study of Chinese distribution centers (DCs) with UK DCs in order to explore the relationship between the supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

This research seeks to undertake a comparative study of Chinese distribution centers (DCs) with UK DCs in order to explore the relationship between the supply chain, logistics and distribution functions, and the gap between the countries. The study has been undertaken in light of Chinese corporate standardization programs in distribution channels. The main goal of the standardization programs has been to create efficient supply chains to be able to control the flow of information, capital, product and other resources. The focus of the study was Fujian Province where the standardization program has meant that functional areas such as marketing and distribution are measured by key performance indicators (KPI), under specific evaluation keys. The study highlights benchmarked KPIs where supply chain entrepreneurship can be brought to bear.

Design/methodology/approach

The method used in this research is quantitative via a small scale sample. Questionnaires were sent to Chinese DCs in Fujian Province with additional quantitative information sought through telephone follow‐up.

Findings

The data have been analyzed and compared to UK DCs for inventory level, order lead‐times, customer segmentation, value‐added activities, and floor area utilization. DCs are a long way from internationally competitive best practice across complex product categories. This provides opportunity for entrepreneurial third party inventory storage and management. DCs also exhibits low transportation efficiency due to low vehicle loading factors, also affecting DC order lead‐time efficiency and value‐added activities. There is opportunity here for entrepreneurial activity in offering efficient (lean) and responsive (agile) third party transport services. There is also evidence of poor process management implying opportunity for the application of entrepreneurial consulting capability to resource and reengineer end‐end process chains.

Research limitations/implications

The research generalisability is limited due its small scale sample in a single Chinese province.

Practical implications

Despite a modernization program the implications of this study are that Chinese DCs are not ready for traditional international competition, but in the short‐term entrepreneurs may be able to design sustainable lean and agile supply chains that are at least as good as those in the UK.

Originality/value

The study's originality is its comparative benchmark of Chinese with UK DCs.

Details

Journal of Chinese Entrepreneurship, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1396

Keywords

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