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Article
Publication date: 3 October 2016

Christoph Merschbrock, Ann Karina Lassen, Tor Tollnes and Bjørn Erik Munkvold

This paper aims to enquire into how building information modelling (BIM) and gaming can be integrated to support professionals in their learning about the spatial layout…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to enquire into how building information modelling (BIM) and gaming can be integrated to support professionals in their learning about the spatial layout of a new building. This knowledge is important to prepare building operation and facilities management (FM).

Design/methodology/approach

Ingrained in task–technology fit theory, this paper reports from a case study of a serious game staged in the graphical environment of a building information model. A series of interviews with the client, subject-matter experts and software developers involved in developing the game were conducted. The industrial setting for the study is a major hospital construction project in Norway. The project has been awarded BuildingSMART’s 2015 award for “outstanding open BIM practice”, making it Norway’s role model for BIM practice.

Findings

Importing and exporting geometry from BIM into a game engine remain challenging. The transfer of data between the two requires workarounds using intermediary software. Apart from issues related to technical interoperability, several sociotechnical challenges influential for the integration of BIM and gaming have been identified, related to: the collaboration among construction, operational and gaming experts; clear communication of information needs; and better contractual agreements.

Research limitations/implications

BIM’s geometric and semantic data enabled the creation of a sophisticated game for preparing building operation. Test-users perceived the game to be superior to classroom teaching for learning about the spatial layout of the building. However, quantifying the business value of the game for operation after occupancy of the new facilities was beyond the scope of this study.

Originality/value

The work presented exemplifies a novel application area of BIM and gaming technology in FM. The findings presented in this article are relevant for professionals and scholars seeking to expand the utility of BIM for starting up the operation of new facilities.

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Mattias Jacobsson and Christoph Merschbrock

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role, practices and responsibilities of building information modeling (BIM) coordinators (BCs).

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the role, practices and responsibilities of building information modeling (BIM) coordinators (BCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The aim is achieved through a review of existing publications (n=183) in which the term “BIM coordinators” has been described and discussed (n=78), complemented by interviews with four Norwegian BIM experts.

Findings

The findings from the review indicate that the core responsibilities of BCs involve clash detection, managing information flows and communication flows, monitoring and coordinating design changes, supporting new working procedures and technical development and acting as a boundary spanner. The complementary interview study extends these findings with two additional practices and a reflection on the experienced challenges, obstacles and potential future development of the role. In essence, the authors propose that the role of BCs can be defined as being responsible for external/internal alignment and coordination of actor needs, and engaged in product-, process- and system-oriented practices of BIM.

Research limitations/implications

Given that this study is primarily an integrative literature review of BCs, it has the limitations common with such an approach. Therefore, future studies should preferably extend presented findings through either a survey, further in-depth interviews with BCs or reviews of closely related BIM specialist roles such as BIM managers or BIM technicians.

Practical implications

With BCs seemingly being central to information management and knowledge domain integration within the architecture, engineering and construction industry, an understanding of their importance and role should be of interest to anyone seeking to tap into the potential of BIM. This paper outlines specific implications for construction manager, educators and BCs.

Originality/value

The value of this study lies primarily in the fact that it is the first thorough investigation of the role, practices and responsibilities of BCs.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2017

M. Reza Hosseini, Petra Bosch-Sijtsema, Mehrdad Arashpour, Nicholas Chileshe and Christoph Merschbrock

The “virtuality” of a team collaborative interaction is the extent to which it is accomplished in the same place, in fully distributed virtual teams, or in a hybrid…

Abstract

Purpose

The “virtuality” of a team collaborative interaction is the extent to which it is accomplished in the same place, in fully distributed virtual teams, or in a hybrid combination of the two. However, existence, strength and process of potential association between virtuality and effectiveness in construction project teams have remained elusive. This paper aims to address this gap in the literature.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, a conceptual model demonstrating the association between virtuality and effectiveness of teams was developed through integrating the input-process-output (IPO) model and the “Big Five” theory. This conceptual model was contextualised for the construction industry drawing upon conducting 17 semi-structured interviews with hybrid team experts.

Findings

The findings provide the first model mapping the associations between virtuality and dimensions of team effectiveness for the construction context.

Practical implications

The discovered patterns of associations between virtuality and dimensions of effectiveness for hybrid construction project teams (HCPTs) will assist managers in designing and running more effective teams. In addition, the findings help construction practitioners better understand how virtuality influence the performance and satisfaction of team members in HCPTs. The present study concludes with outlining a set of recommendations based on the findings of the study.

Originality/value

As the first study in its kind, the present study offers a new insight into the concept and impacts of virtuality for construction teams and provides instructions and guidelines for designing and maintaining the effectiveness of such teams on construction projects.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

Keywords

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