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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2017

Merata Kawharu, Paul Tapsell and Christine Woods

Exploring the links between resilience, sustainability and entrepreneurship from an indigenous perspective means exploring the historic and socio-cultural context out of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Exploring the links between resilience, sustainability and entrepreneurship from an indigenous perspective means exploring the historic and socio-cultural context out of which a community originates. From this perspective, informed insight into a community’s ability to adapt and to transform without major structural collapse when confronted with exogenous challenges or crises can be gained. This paper explores the interplay between resilience and entrepreneurship in a New Zealand indigenous setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors provide a theoretical and case study approach, exploring four intersecting leadership roles, their guiding value system and application at a micro kin family level through a tourism venture and at a macro kin tribal level through an urban land development venture.

Findings

The findings demonstrate the importance of historical precedent and socio-cultural values in shaping the leadership matrix that addresses exogenous challenges and crises in an entrepreneurship context.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited to New Zealand, but the findings have synergies with other indigenous entrepreneurship elsewhere. Further cross-cultural research in this field includes examining the interplay between rights and duties within indigenous communities as contributing facets to indigenous resilience and entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This research is a contribution to theory and to indigenous community entrepreneurship in demonstrating what values and behaviours are assistive in confronting shocks, crises and challenges. Its originality is in the multi-disciplinary approach, combining economic and social anthropological, indigenous and non-indigenous perspectives. The originality of this paper also includes an analysis of contexts that appear to fall outside contemporary entrepreneurship, but are in fact directly linked.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2021

Billie Lythberg, Jamie Newth and Christine Woods

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a complexity informed understanding of Indigenous–settler relationships helps people to better understand Indigenous social…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how a complexity informed understanding of Indigenous–settler relationships helps people to better understand Indigenous social innovation. To do this, this paper uses the attractor concept from complexity thinking to explore both the history and possible futures of Indigenous Maori social innovation as shaped by Te Tiriti o Waitangi/Treaty of Waitangi.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper frames Te Tiriti as a structural attractor for social innovation in Aotearoa-New Zealand and explores the dynamics at play in the social and economic activities related to Te Tiriti and the ongoing settlement process in Aotearoa-New Zealand. This paper outlines this as an illustrative case study detailing the relevant contextual spaces and dynamics that interact and the emergence of social innovation.

Findings

This paper suggests that the convergent, divergent and unifying dynamics present in a structural attractor provide a useful framework for building ongoing engagement between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people whereby Indigenous worldviews are given space to be articulated and valued.

Originality/value

In spite of the increase in research into social innovation, including in Indigenous contexts, the “context” of “postcolonial” context remains under-theorised and people’s understanding of the power dynamics at play here limits the understanding of how the mechanisms of Indigenous–settler partnerships structure social innovation and its impact.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Paul Woodfield, Christine Woods and Deborah Shepherd

The purpose of this paper is to review family businesses as a subset of sustainable entrepreneurship. It is intended that another avenue of scholarship for the growing…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review family businesses as a subset of sustainable entrepreneurship. It is intended that another avenue of scholarship for the growing interest in family businesses and their continuity across generations will be outlined.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant journal articles were selected and broadly analysed to gather an understanding of the current state of existing sustainable entrepreneurship literature. The main themes extrapolated related to sustainable entrepreneurship and potential directions for future research.

Findings

Although sustainable entrepreneurship has been traditionally concentrated in the environmental and social responsibility literature, there are emerging paths where family businesses can be considered alongside community-based enterprise.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that future research into sustaining family businesses across generations could be situated under sustainable entrepreneurship scholarship.

Originality/value

This paper presents a novel review and summary of recent literature at the juncture of family business and sustainable entrepreneurship. It is useful for directing scholars towards an avenue which has not traditionally had attention from family business researchers.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Paul J. Woodfield, Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

This paper aims to investigate how family winegrowing businesses can be sustained across generations.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate how family winegrowing businesses can be sustained across generations.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors engaged a multi-level case study approach. In total, 27 semi-structured interviews were conducted with three winegrowing firms in New Zealand. All family members (both senior and next generation) employed in each business were interviewed alongside non-family employees.

Findings

Three key dimensions – knowledge sharing, entrepreneurial characteristics and leadership attributes – were identified that can support successful successions in family winegrowing businesses.

Originality/value

The authors have generated a theory that enables academicians and practitioners to understand how family winegrowing businesses can be successfully sustained across generations. The authors argue that knowledge is a central feature in family firms where previous research combines knowledge with entrepreneurial orientation or the resources and capabilities of a firm.

Details

International Journal of Wine Business Research, vol. 29 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1062

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 August 2010

Joanna Overall, Paul Tapsell and Christine Woods

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the importance of taking into account contextual factors when building governing mechanisms, so that the subsequent processes…

1705

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the importance of taking into account contextual factors when building governing mechanisms, so that the subsequent processes and structures are appropriate and sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper utilises the singular case study illustration of Māori Maps, an indigenous social and entrepreneurial venture to illustrate the notion of contextualised governance. Considering this focus centres on notions of context, the case study method is most appropriate as it allows for a fuller explanation of the specific contextual factors relating to the study.

Findings

In taking into account the unique contextual factors relating to Māori Maps, the paper shows that they have incorporated culturally appropriate models and processes of governance.

Research limitations/implications

This context‐specific case study illustration supports new governance research avenues that assert that context matters, and contributes to the body of evidence that suggests that traditional frameworks of governance cannot be applied to all organisations, with no regard being taken for varying contextual factors.

Practical implications

This case study illustration may encourage other groups in similar scenarios (but with varying contextual surroundings) to develop their own innovative models of governance which suit their surroundings.

Originality/value

The authors have utilised the Māori Maps case study previously in the context of innovation and entrepreneurship studies. The insights drawn from studying the intersection between governance theory and social entrepreneurship in this context are new.

Details

Social Enterprise Journal, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-8614

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Christine Farbrother

Life is a sequence of tiny events and most of us feel that our days are pretty ordinary. Chris Farbrother's article is a simple description of going for a walk. That's…

Abstract

Life is a sequence of tiny events and most of us feel that our days are pretty ordinary. Chris Farbrother's article is a simple description of going for a walk. That's all. But perhaps it hints at the benefits of exercise, the healing power of the countryside and the triumph of small achievements.

Details

A Life in the Day, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-6282

Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

Interest in academic entrepreneurship is gaining attention as pressure on academic institutions to be more entrepreneurial increases. To date, emphasis has been on the…

Abstract

Interest in academic entrepreneurship is gaining attention as pressure on academic institutions to be more entrepreneurial increases. To date, emphasis has been on the transfer and commercialisation of research with little discussion focused on the entrepreneurial potential of university teaching. Drawing on Schumpeter’s theory of entrepreneurship, in particular the combining and recombining of resources and the concept of resistance, we provide an illustrative case study of one entrepreneurial academic venture that emerged from the teaching activities of a university. We examine how this venture, the ICEHOUSE, has evolved and been sustained despite pressure from competing logics from its partnering institutions. We argue that multiple and competing logics by various stakeholder groups led to ‘resistive tension’ which has supported the growth of the organisation.

Details

Academic Entrepreneurship: Creating an Entrepreneurial Ecosystem
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-984-3

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 14 November 2017

Jamie Newth, Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

World Vision exists to eradicate extreme poverty. The primary fundraising mechanism that has fuelled its growth into one of the largest international non-governmental…

Abstract

World Vision exists to eradicate extreme poverty. The primary fundraising mechanism that has fuelled its growth into one of the largest international non-governmental organizations (INGOs) has been Child Sponsorship, which connects over 10 million individual donors with vulnerable children around the world. However, shifts in the market, geopolitical landscape, and institutional logics have seen this once innovative product come under increasing pressure. Using World Vision New Zealand (WVNZ) as a case study, we explore the challenges of implementing social entrepreneurship strategies, including the institutional constraints of developing new business models, through hybridization. Hybridity has gained increasing attention in the field of entrepreneurship and has been offered as a sense-making frame for business model innovation within social entrepreneurship. The use of institutional logics to understand the challenges of hybrid organizing in social entrepreneurship has been invaluable. However, as with any theoretical perspective, this approach has limitations. We suggest that nuanced challenges and sources of resistance to social entrepreneurship in established sectors and organizations might usefully be explored through concepts drawn from complexity theory. Specifically, we propose the use of the concept of structural attractors, which enables the explication of convergent, unifying, and generative dynamics. Our case study findings suggest that, paradoxically, the very essence of historical success may constrain future success. To wit, when faced with changes to institutional and market conditions, WVNZ was constrained by the very construct that enabled its initial growth. The challenge that this case demonstrates is that despite ostensibly hybrid shifts occurring in the management, governance, and espoused innovation strategy of the organization, the governing structural attractor of Child Sponsorship has constrained innovation and change.

Details

Hybrid Ventures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-078-5

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 August 2008

Paul Tapsell and Christine Woods

This paper examines the models used to teach and encourage indigenous entrepreneurial activity, with a focus on indigenous entrepreneurship in a Maori context.

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines the models used to teach and encourage indigenous entrepreneurial activity, with a focus on indigenous entrepreneurship in a Maori context.

Design/methodology/approach

In particular, the paper explores the pedagogical challenges from the perspective of indigenous entrepreneurship understood from a Maori context and draws on an historical and cultural analysis of kin accountability within a tribal context to explore the pedagogical challenges faced when working with a new generation of aspiring entrepreneurially‐minded Maori. Three short case studies are provided as illustrative examples.

Findings

The paper finds that entrepreneurial models focusing on opportunity‐seeking potiki (aspiring younger individuals) will likely remain limited in application until they successfully integrate the genealogical check and balance of the potiki, namely the elder‐rangatira. This rangatira: potiki customary leadership tension has been Maori society's generative survival portal to taking advantage of new opportunities (potikitanga) for 100 or more generations. The paper suggests that while Maori ventures may adequately reflect what constitutes successful commercial entrepreneurship, such ventures also need to be further developed in terms of kin‐accountability beyond current social/economic entrepreneurial thinking if they are to legitimately benefit Maori society.

Originality/value

Although only one cultural context is examined, this paper demonstrates the potential benefit of a deeper understanding of the cultural genealogical setting when developing models to work with indigenous entrepreneurs.

Details

Journal of Enterprising Communities: People and Places in the Global Economy, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6204

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2013

Summer Brines, Deborah Shepherd and Christine Woods

Continued research around innovation within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) family businesses is needed to better understand the influence of specific resources…

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Abstract

Purpose

Continued research around innovation within small- and medium-sized enterprises (SME) family businesses is needed to better understand the influence of specific resources and capabilities that might promote and/or constrain entrepreneurial activities. The purpose of this paper is to develop an organising framework investigating SME family business innovation drawing on a Schumpeterian understanding of innovation as the introduction of new combinations.

Design/methodology/approach

Four guiding principles are developed and applied to an illustrative case study of an entrepreneurial family business that highlights the usefulness of complexity thinking for understanding innovation.

Findings

NZ Sock provides a rich illustrative case study to highlight how principles of complexity thinking along with Schumpeterian notions of innovation can usefully inform the authors’ understanding of entrepreneurial SME family businesses. The proposed guiding principles offered are borne out in application to the illustrative case example.

Research limitations/implications

The findings suggest that complexity thinking and a Schumpeterian lens can usefully inform and extend the authors’ understanding of innovation within entrepreneurial SME family businesses. Further research would benefit from exploring the guiding principles proposed in other entrepreneurial SME family businesses to further substantiate this field of inquiry.

Practical implications

Principles of complexity thinking may provide additional understanding and insight for SME family business members needing to innovate and adapt to ever-changing operating environments.

Originality/value

Innovation is critical to the long-term survival and success of such firms; yet, to date little theoretical contribution and research has been offered in the field of innovation within the context of SME family businesses. Complex adaptive systems provide a lens from which to understand such businesses and that that a complexity framework helpfully allows attention to be given to such phenomena as emergence, adaptability and combinations through which innovation outcomes and processes may be understood. This paper offers four guiding principles that can be further tested and refined.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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