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Article
Publication date: 29 March 2019

Christine Armatas and Christine F. Spratt

The purpose of this paper is to describe examples of the application of learning analytics (LA), including the assessment of subject grades, identifying subjects that need…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe examples of the application of learning analytics (LA), including the assessment of subject grades, identifying subjects that need revision, student satisfaction and cohort comparisons, to program curriculum review.

Design/methodology/approach

Examples of analyses that address specific questions that a curriculum review wishes to address are provided, together with examples of visualizations from the analyses to aid interpretation.

Findings

The results show that using LA as a part of curriculum review can provide insights not possible with the traditional curriculum review methods and can yield useful and actionable insights.

Research limitations/implications

The work in this paper illustrates another important application for LA and demonstrates the value this approach has for informing curriculum enhancement at the program level.

Practical implications

The analyses described provide insights not possible with traditional curriculum review methods. However, the challenge remains to develop analytic tools that can assist teachers to conduct LA independently.

Originality/value

LA have been used to predict grades or identify at-risk students (Gaševic et al., 2016), but there is little research on its use for curriculum evaluation (Méndez et al., 2014). This paper addresses this gap and provides examples of its application in program curriculum review and the insights it can provide.

Details

The International Journal of Information and Learning Technology, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-4880

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Alexandra McCormick and Seu’ula Johansson-Fua

Through the ideas of and within Oceania that we outline, and within which we locate architecture and institutions for CIE regionally, we illustrate the identified turning…

Abstract

Through the ideas of and within Oceania that we outline, and within which we locate architecture and institutions for CIE regionally, we illustrate the identified turning points through analysis of dynamic and intersecting trajectories of the Oceania Comparative and International Education Society (OCIES), formerly the Australia and New Zealand Comparative and International Education Society (ANZCIES), and the Vaka Pasifiki, formerly the Rethinking Pacific Education Initiative for and by Pacific Peoples (RPEIPP) project. We offer initial responses to an over-arching theme in posing the question: how, and through what processes, have these groups influenced understandings of ‘regionalism’ for CIE within Oceania? This involves examining the conferences, financing, membership, the Society journal/publications and aspects of CIE education of the two bodies.

Details

Comparative and International Education: Survey of an Infinite Field
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-392-2

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1936

THE June conference at Margate is so near that we must needs be pre‐occupied with it at the moment although two months ago we were able to give an anticipatory description…

Abstract

THE June conference at Margate is so near that we must needs be pre‐occupied with it at the moment although two months ago we were able to give an anticipatory description of the programme. The protracted and cold winter, culminating in the most “perishing” April of the century, possibly of any century since the Great Ice Age, seems on the threshold of May to have dissolved at last in warmer weather. Margate is a lady in the sun, but perhaps something else under cloud, and wise people take warm clothes when they visit her. We hope, however, that they will not be necessary and that for some hundreds of our readers Margate air will be an invigorating experience.

Details

New Library World, vol. 38 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1938

THERE are now so many meetings of the Library Association and its branches and sections that the good custom of recording meetings and the discussions at them has fallen…

Abstract

THERE are now so many meetings of the Library Association and its branches and sections that the good custom of recording meetings and the discussions at them has fallen into desuetude. In a way it is a gain, for when the discussion was commonplace the account of a meeting became a mere list of those who attended and spoke, bones without flesh; but in the days when The Library Association Record really was a record, its reports were a part of the educational and informational material of every librarian. Something should be done about this, because 1938 opened with a series of meetings which all deserved the fullest report. The principal one was the investiture meeting of the President of the Library Association on January 17th. The attendance was greater than that at any meeting of librarians in recent years, of course other than the Annual Conference. Chaucer House was beautifully arranged, decorated and lighted for the occasion, an atmosphere of cheerfulness and camaraderie pervaded the affair. The speeches were limited to a few preliminary words by the retiring President, the Archbishop of York, before placing the badge on his successor's neck; a brief, but deserved panegyric of Dr. Temple's services by Mr. Berwick Sayers; and then a delightful acknowledgment from His Grace. The serious point the Archbishop made was his surprise at learning the wide extent of the library movement and his conviction that it must be of great value to the community. His lighter touch was exquisite; especially his story of the ceremonial key, which broke in the lock and jammed it when he was opening a library in state, and of his pause to settle mentally the ethical point as to whether he could conscientiously declare he had “opened” a place when he had made it impossible for anyone to get in until a carpenter had been fetched. Altogether a memorable evening, which proved, too, as a guest rightly said, that one cannot easily entertain librarians, but, if you get them together in comfortable conditions, they entertain themselves right well.

Details

New Library World, vol. 40 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1935

THE thoughts of all librarians, chief librarians in particular, are now turned upon the annual conference of the Library Association at Manchester. We understand that all…

Abstract

THE thoughts of all librarians, chief librarians in particular, are now turned upon the annual conference of the Library Association at Manchester. We understand that all the projects of the conference, which we have commented upon in earlier issues, are proceeding satisfactorily. By this time most of our readers who intend to go will have obtained their accommodation in the city. But we advise those who have not done so to delay no longer.

Details

New Library World, vol. 38 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1981

A Crown Court hearing of a charge of applying a false A description under S.2, Trade Descriptions Act, 1968, is given in some detail under Legal Proceedings in this issue…

Abstract

A Crown Court hearing of a charge of applying a false A description under S.2, Trade Descriptions Act, 1968, is given in some detail under Legal Proceedings in this issue of BFJ. It concerns using the word “ham”, ie., the natural leg of a single pig, to various pieces from several pigs, deboned, defatted, “tumbled, massaged and cooked” in a mould shaped to a leg of ham, from which the average purchaser would find it impossible to distinguish. As the defence rightly claimed, this process has been used for at least a couple of decades, and the product forms a sizeable section of the bacon trade. Evidence by prosecution witnesses, experienced shop managers, believed the product to be the genuine “ham”. There is nothing detrimental about the meat, save that it tends to contain an excess of added water, but this applies to many meat products today; or that the manufacturers are setting out to cheat the consumer. What offends is the description given to the product. Manufacture was described in detail—a county trading standards officer inspected the process at the defendant company's Wiltshire factory, witness to the extent of their co‐operation—and was questioned at great length by defending counsel. Specimens of the product were exhibited and the jury were treated to a tasting test—presumably designed to refute prosecution's claim that the meat was of “poor value”. The trial judge said the jury had no doubt been enlightened as to the methods of manufacturing ham. The marketing of the product was also a subject of examination.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 83 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 12 August 2013

Penelope A. McNulty, Angelica G. Thompson-Butel, Christine T. Shiner and Terry Trinh

Stroke patients with low and very low functional movement are not usually considered suitable for rehabilitation. Without therapy the more-affected side will not improve…

Abstract

Purpose

Stroke patients with low and very low functional movement are not usually considered suitable for rehabilitation. Without therapy the more-affected side will not improve and may lose any residual function. Poor movement ability reduces independence and limits the social engagement of such patients. The purpose of this paper was to investigate whether Wii-based Movement Therapy was suitable and beneficial for stroke patients with low and very low movement ability.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 13 patients aged 22-77 years and three months to 21 years post-stroke completed the standardised 14-day protocol of Wii-based Movement Therapy. Therapy is a structured and targeted programme, tailored to the individual needs and deficits of each patient. Functional ability was assessed using a suite of tools. Increased use of the more-affected hand and arm in everyday life was assessed using the Quality of Movement subscale of the Motor Activity Log.

Findings

Functional movement of the more-affected hand and arm improved by 40 per cent on the Fugl-Meyer Assessment. Hand-use in everyday tasks more than doubled and improvements were also seen in lower-limb function, balance, and cardiovascular function. Qualitative improvements in psychological status were also noted.

Practical implications

The paper demonstrates that stroke patients with low and very low movement ability post-stroke can benefit from upper-limb rehabilitation. Wii-based Movement Therapy is a viable and effective option with high patient compliance.

Originality/value

The patients in this study became less disabled. Improving movement ability of stroke survivors will not only increase their independence in activities of daily living but will also reduce the burden of care on patients, their families and the community.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 4 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

Keywords

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