Search results

1 – 10 of 12
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Pat Auger, Timothy Devinney, Grahame Dowling and Christine Eckert

Socially responsible investment (SRI) funds have grown dramatically as an investment alternative in most of the developed world. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Abstract

Purpose

Socially responsible investment (SRI) funds have grown dramatically as an investment alternative in most of the developed world. The paper aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a structured experimental approach to determine if the decision-making process of investors to invest in SRIs is consistent with the process used for conventional investments. The theoretical framework draws on two widely studied concepts in the decision making and investment literature, namely, inertia and discounting.

Findings

The authors find that inertia plays a significant role in the selection of SRI funds and that investors systemically discount the value of SRIs.

Research limitations/implications

The results suggest that SRIs need to be designed to cater to the risk/return profiles of investors and that these investors need to be better informed about the performance of SRIs vs conventional investments to reduce their systematic discounting.

Originality/value

Unique experimental approach applied to investment alternatives in a manner that captures individual level variation.

Details

Annals in Social Responsibility, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3515

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 November 2014

Paul F. Burke, Christine Eckert and Stacey Davis

This paper aims to quantify the relative importance of reasons used to explain consumers’ selection and rejection of ethical products, accounting for differences in…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to quantify the relative importance of reasons used to explain consumers’ selection and rejection of ethical products, accounting for differences in ethical orientations across consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

Reviewing previous literature and drawing on in-depth interviews, a taxonomy of reasons for and against ethical purchasing is developed. An online survey incorporating best–worst scaling (BWS) determines which reasons feature more in shaping ethical consumerism. Cluster analysis and multinomial regression are used to identify and profile segments.

Findings

Positively orientated consumers (42 per cent of respondents) purchase ethical products more so because of reasons relating to impact, health, personal relevance, and quality. Negatively orientated consumers (34 per cent of respondents) reject ethical alternatives based on reasons relating to indifference, expense, confusion and scepticism. A third segment is ambivalent in their behaviour and reasoning; they perceive ethical purchasing to be effective and relevant, but are confused and sceptical under what conditions this can occur.

Research limitations/implications

Preferences were elicited using an online survey rather than using real market data. Though the task instructions and methods used attempted to minimise social-desirability bias, the experiment might still be subject to its effects.

Practical implications

Competitive positioning strategies can be better designed knowing which barriers to ethical purchasing are more relevant. The paper challenges the benefits in altruistic-based positioning and outlines shortcomings in communication about ethical products, including those relating to product labelling.

Social implications

Through their purchase behaviours across a number of categories, ethical consumers aim to minimise the harm and exploitation of humans, animals and the natural environment. This research provides insights into the potential reasons why the uptake of ethical products is not being achieved and how it can be addressed to make improvements in making this movement more mainstream.

Originality/value

This research examines an extensive list of reasons for and against ethical purchasing used by a general population of consumers. By forcing respondents to make trade-offs, this is the first study quantifying the relative importance of reasons utilised by consumers. It also highlights the value in using cluster analysis on best–worst scores to identify underlying segments.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 48 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 6 November 2018

Christine Nya-Ling Tan and T. Ramayah

To compete in a globally challenging environment, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are increasingly pressured to leverage their relational capital to stay competitive…

Abstract

Purpose

To compete in a globally challenging environment, small and medium enterprises (SMEs) are increasingly pressured to leverage their relational capital to stay competitive. The purpose of this study is to model the KS behaviour of SMEs in an increasingly networked world through communities of practice (CoP).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a survey instrument developed based on prior literature from SMEs operating only in the electronic manufacturing industry. A total of 120 responses were received of which only 100 were valid. SmartPLS, a second-generation analysis software, was used to analyse the model developed.

Findings

The findings indicated that affect, reward, perceived consequences and social factor were all positive predictors of KS behaviour of SMEs in communities of practice. Interestingly, the facilitating conditions were found to negatively influence KS behaviour.

Practical implications

The findings are helpful to SMEs who are embarking on knowledge management (KM) practices in their respective companies and may be used to leverage the drivers of KM to improve more sharing behaviour that keeps SMEs competitive.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors' knowledge, few studies have explored the individual (i.e. perceived consequences, affect), social (i.e. social factor) and organisational (i.e. facilitating condition, reward) predictors of KS behaviour among CoP’s in Malaysian SMEs.

Details

Journal of Systems and Information Technology, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1328-7265

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 16 March 2021

Abstract

Details

Flapjacks and Feudalism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-389-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2002

Christine Bieri Buschor, Esther Forrer and Katharina Maag Merki

This article presents some of the initial results of the National Young Adult Survey (YAS), which is currently collecting data on the cross‐curriculum competencies of…

Abstract

This article presents some of the initial results of the National Young Adult Survey (YAS), which is currently collecting data on the cross‐curriculum competencies of 14,905 18‐ to 22‐year‐olds in Switzerland. Young adults show a willingness to continue their education during the first five years after school. Using a regression model, it was found that the willingness of these young people to continue their education and training is dependent on achievement motivation, contingency beliefs, self‐efficacy, cooperation, independence and level of education.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 44 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 17 February 2017

Christoph Dörrenbächer and Mike Geppert

This article takes stock of interdisciplinary research on Multinational Corporations (MNCs) by elucidating paradigmatic shifts in the world of MNCs in the new millennium…

Abstract

This article takes stock of interdisciplinary research on Multinational Corporations (MNCs) by elucidating paradigmatic shifts in the world of MNCs in the new millennium and analysing more recent developments in the disciplines of International Business (IB) and Organization Theory (OT). The article also introduces the altogether 14 individual contributions of this 49th volume of the Research in the Sociology of Organizations series. It closes by looking into the questions of where interdisciplinary OT/IB research on MNCs is now and where it is likely to go in the future.

Details

Multinational Corporations and Organization Theory: Post Millennium Perspectives
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-386-3

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2014

Julien Calmand, Jean-François Giret and Christine Guégnard

In France, the vocationalization of higher education has resulted in an increase in the number of graduates and created new opportunities. The access of these vocational…

Abstract

Purpose

In France, the vocationalization of higher education has resulted in an increase in the number of graduates and created new opportunities. The access of these vocational bachelor graduates to the labour market raises the issue of their professional prospects amid changing economic and social circumstances. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

To provide insights into these issues, the employment situation of bachelor graduates during the first years of active working life will be compared with other tertiary graduates entering the labour market in the same years, using econometric models that estimate the effects of vocational courses “all other things being equal”, incorporating a range of individual characteristics.

Findings

Overall, vocational bachelor graduates experienced fewer difficulties in seeking to enter the labour market during difficult economic circumstances. They did not achieve upward social mobility with a lower probability of obtaining a managerial/professional occupation three years after graduation. These results confirm that diplomas continue to play a central and hierarchized role in France.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is to highlight the labour market transition of vocational bachelor graduates during a period of economic crisis, inquiring on the social benefit of this new diploma in France: what were the impacts of the changing economic conditions and influx of vocational bachelor graduates on their labour market transition and their chances of upward social mobility?

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 October 2010

Joshua Doane, Judy A. Lane and Michael J. Pisani

Volume 25 celebrates the 25th year of publication for the American Journal of Business (AJB). Launched by eight MAC schools of business in March 1986, the Journal has…

Abstract

Volume 25 celebrates the 25th year of publication for the American Journal of Business (AJB). Launched by eight MAC schools of business in March 1986, the Journal has featured more than 700 authors who have contributed more than 330 research articles at the intersection of theory and practice. From accounting to marketing, management to finance, the Journal prominently covers the breadth of the business disciplines as a general business outlet intended for both practitioners and academics. As the Journal reaches out beyond the MAC in sponsorship, authorship, and readership, we assess the Journal’s first quarter century of impact.

Details

American Journal of Business, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1935-5181

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 29 November 2016

Becky Malby and Murray Anderson-Wallace

Abstract

Details

Networks in Healthcare
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-283-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Christine Vallaster

In order to ensure consistency in brand management activities, employees need to develop a shared understanding of what their brand stands for. This process receives even…

Abstract

In order to ensure consistency in brand management activities, employees need to develop a shared understanding of what their brand stands for. This process receives even greater complexity in a multicultural workforce. Despite an increase of interest in internal branding, literature widely lacks an understanding of how employees from different cultural backgrounds develop a shared brand understanding and how leaders can facilitate this process. This paper introduces a road map to action research: First, a justification as to why action research is considered an appropriate model to capture internal brand building processes is provided. Subsequently, the main steps that led to the development of the presented methodological framework are outlined by referring to results of pre‐tests or to already published material where appropriate.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

1 – 10 of 12