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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

William A. Drago and Christine Clements

Looks at the relationship between strategic planning and leadership characteristics, claiming that, in most research, leadership characteristics are seen as a dependent variable…

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Abstract

Looks at the relationship between strategic planning and leadership characteristics, claiming that, in most research, leadership characteristics are seen as a dependent variable. Carries out a survey of 91 firms (through questionnaires sent to Chief Executive Officers) using a 7‐point Likert scale to measure responses. Performs varimax rotation and regression analysis to analyse the results. Focuses on three specific characteristics ‐ power/control, creativity, and people/dependence ‐ and attempts to establish the impact these characteristics have on plan intensity (the degree to which organization members are guided by an established plan) and the use of direction‐setting tools such as mission/vision, long‐term objectives, short‐term objectives and action planning. Reviews some literature in the separate fields of strategic planning and leadership, drawing together various strands to suggest that leadership characteristics are important predictors of plan intensity within organizations and that they will also be strong predictors on how direction‐setting tools are used within the organizational planning process. Discusses the findings as they link into the three leadership factors mentioned. Mentions, also, the planning index and how it relates to planning intensity. Concludes that leadership characteristics are strong predictors of planning intensity and planning tools. Notes limitations of the study.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Louise Tourigny, William L. Dougan, John Washbush and Christine Clements

The recent significant occurrences of dysfunctional, and perhaps unethical, decision making and actions by a number of highly successful corporate executives suggest that there…

2880

Abstract

The recent significant occurrences of dysfunctional, and perhaps unethical, decision making and actions by a number of highly successful corporate executives suggest that there are systematic explanations for the questionable managerial behaviors that go beyond simple attributions of individual character flaws. This paper draws from four management research streams to identify some enabling conditions that constitute plausible mechanisms that may have exacerbated the present situation. Research traditions include the literature pertaining to the primacy of the rights of shareholders in equity capital financed corporate organizations, the literature describing the mechanisms whereby charisma is socially constructed and institutionalized, the literature attributing the gravitation toward positions of power on the part of individuals with predispositions to act in an unethical manner and the literature describing conditions which limit the ability of principals to fully specify the provisions of contracts with agents who are in positions of control of corporate organizations.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 41 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1999

John B. Washbush and Christine Clements

A number of years ago, the psychologist David McClelland, in his studies of managerial motivation, identified two types of power: egoistic (using others for personal gain) and…

5486

Abstract

A number of years ago, the psychologist David McClelland, in his studies of managerial motivation, identified two types of power: egoistic (using others for personal gain) and social (facilitating group cooperation and effort for the achievement of the general good). Clearly, the power motive is intimately related to the concept of leadership. However, over the last two or three decades, a school of thought has arisen which equates leadership with “doing the right thing”. Defining leadership in such an ethical light is both misleading and dangerous. Leadership, as influence skill, possesses the ability to induce both positive and negative results. A failure to acknowledge and examine the “dark side” of leadership can distort efforts to learn about leadership, may encourage development of a blind‐eye approach to examining the results of influence attempts, and might turn well‐intentioned groups into lemmings heading for the sea. Authenticity requires a balanced discussion.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1999

Christine Clements and John B. Washbush

A number of years ago, David McClelland, in his studies of managerial motivation, identified two types of power: egoistic (using others for personal gain) and social (facilitating…

10806

Abstract

A number of years ago, David McClelland, in his studies of managerial motivation, identified two types of power: egoistic (using others for personal gain) and social (facilitating group cooperation and effort for the achievement of the general good). Clearly, the power motive is intimately related to the concept of leadership. However, over the last several decades, a school of thought has arisen which equates leadership with “doing the right thing”. Defining leadership in such an ethical light is both misleading and dangerous. At the same time, little has been done to address the role of followers in the influence process, and transformational models of leadership have exacerbated this problem. Failure to acknowledge the role of followers and to examine the “dark side” of leader‐follower dynamics can distort efforts to understand influence processes in an authentic way. This paper provides balance to this discussion and identifies a number of critical implications for leadership education.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1995

Christine J. Clements and Bharath M. Josiam

Outlines a step‐by‐step procedure to evaluate both the costs andthe benefits of any training proposal. The evaluation permits owners andmanagers to make informed decisions about…

4357

Abstract

Outlines a step‐by‐step procedure to evaluate both the costs and the benefits of any training proposal. The evaluation permits owners and managers to make informed decisions about appropriate training methods. The operator is often forced to choose between informal on‐the‐job training and structured off‐the‐job training. Utilizes a financial analysis model for identifying the dollar value of both performance and training. Compares benefits and costs of two different training approaches side‐by‐side to identify the method that will deliver the maximum financial benefit.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Abstract

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Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

Article
Publication date: 8 June 2015

Diana K. Wakimoto and Christine Susan Bruce

This paper aims to explore the varying ways in which academic archivists in the USA experience archives, how these experiences compare to those of academic librarians and how we…

4365

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the varying ways in which academic archivists in the USA experience archives, how these experiences compare to those of academic librarians and how we can use these findings to improve communication and collaboration.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a phenomenographic research approach, academic archivists were interviewed and the transcripts were examined to develop categories reflecting varying experiences.

Findings

There are three different ways of experiencing archives: as organizational records, as archival enterprise and as connection. The connection category is a more complex way of experiencing archives as it incorporates the aspects of the other two categories as well as the awareness of archives connecting people to their histories.

Research limitations/implications

This study is limited to academic archivists in the USA.

Practical implications

Understanding that there are different ways of experiencing archives means that information professionals should clarify their definitions of before beginning collaborative projects. Also, by understanding these varying experiences, information professions should be able to communicate and engage more fully with each other and their users in projects and programs that leverage archival collections.

Originality/value

This is the first study to use phenomenography to investigate archivists’ experiences of archives. This understanding of the lived experience of archivists, combined with understanding how librarians experience archives, should enable better communication and ultimately collaboration between the two professions.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 43 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Michael Saker and Leighton Evans

This chapter is concerned with exploring the various ways in which Pokémon Go complements or challenges family life. The chapter begins by explicating the multisided concept of…

Abstract

This chapter is concerned with exploring the various ways in which Pokémon Go complements or challenges family life. The chapter begins by explicating the multisided concept of play and the myriad definitions that surround this term. Having established the various way in which this phenomenon can improve the lives of those who engage in it – physically, emotionally and cognitively – we go on to consider how play has gradually shifted from public spaces and into designated playgrounds, and how this trend corresponds with children concurrently moving away from the streets and into their bedrooms. Following this, we explore the impact digital technologies are having on the practice of parenting, paying particular attention to video games as a significant facet of youth culture that is often associated with a range of negative connotations. Yet, video games are not intrinsically bad. As we outline, research on intergenerational play and joint-media engagement (JME) readily demonstrate the many benefits families can experience when these games are played together. What is missing from this developing body of work is the familial playing of locative games and the extent to which this practice adds contours to our understanding of this field. The chapter is, therefore, driven by the following research questions. First, why and how do families play Pokémon Go? This includes the different roles that family members adopt, alongside motivations for families playing this game, how the playing of this game complements the rhythms of family life and the extent to which this hybrid reality game (HRG) is suited to intergenerational play. Second, what impact does locative familial play have on families, collectively speaking, and regarding individual family members? Here, we are not just interested in whether this game allows families to bond and how this bonding process is experienced, but also whether the familial play of Pokémon Go provides families with any learning opportunities that might facilitate personal growth beyond the game. Third, what worries might parents have about the familial playing of Pokémon Go and to what extent does the locative aspect of this game reshape their apprehensions?

Details

Intergenerational Locative Play
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-139-1

Content available

Abstract

Details

Journal of Public Procurement, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1535-0118

Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Christine Cooper and Daniela Senkl

Through a feminist lens, this study aims to provide insight into the ability of KPMG’s true value approach to include “the other” in the corporate value creation process and into…

1365

Abstract

Purpose

Through a feminist lens, this study aims to provide insight into the ability of KPMG’s true value approach to include “the other” in the corporate value creation process and into its potential to introduce a more “multiple” form of accounting. Additionally, this study seeks to set up the true value approach within its broader social, economic and political context.

Design/methodology/approach

The study uses an interpretative analysis of KPMG’s document “A New Vision of Value; Connecting corporate and societal value creation”.

Findings

The KPMG document uses a language of fear of an external threat to promote its true value approach. It is suggested in this study that the concern of the KPMG approach is to include “the other” in their valuation model if it has an impact on corporate earnings. However, stakeholder actions or governmental regulations could be problematically attenuat by the document’s use of a language which suggests integration of “the other” and which might be perceived as socially progressive. It is argue that the increase in societal or environmental value set out in the KPMG document depends upon “excessive” commodity production which uses up scarce environmental resources.

Research limitations/implications

The implication of this research is that the daunting problems of inequality and environmental destruction cannot be solved by initiatives such as the KMPG true value technology.

Practical implications

The paper argues that a feminine management or reporting framework would not need to fulfil the aim of managing the other in the sense of measurement and control, as it is not based on the fear of loss. It would instead be an approach of giving and caring. A feminine alternative, however, is difficult to express in phallogo-centric language. The ability to bring about change requires the capacity to understand the prevalent symbolic order and the willingness to challenge it.

Social implications

The feminist perspective used in this paper to critically reflect on KPMG’s true value approach and the neo-liberal economy in which it is embedded aims to create public awareness of the prevalent phallocentric symbolic order. Recognising the invisible power of the symbolic order is essential to be able to see how the new “integrative” management and reporting approaches are only slight modifications of the existing management and reporting tools. The paper highlights that these “alternatives” create the impression that business is dealing with the greatest global threats and can potentially be used to silence critics.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to existing critiques of integrated or shared value approaches by taking a feminist view. Even though corporate claims of “win-win situations” (in which environmental degradation and inequality can be solved as business opportunities) have been critiqued in the literature, this study adopts a rather unusual perspective (in accounting). This approach argues that initiatives grounded in the phallogo-centric symbolic order are incapable of overcoming the current problems of our society; but they bear the risk of making the situation worse by creating a public impression that “someone is dealing appropriately with serious social and environmental issues”.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

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1 – 10 of 69