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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2010

Manfred Kirchgeorg, Christiane Springer and Evelyn Kästner

Trade shows have played a prominent role in the corporate communication mix for many years. Enterprises use these multifunctional communication platforms to pursue a wide…

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Abstract

Purpose

Trade shows have played a prominent role in the corporate communication mix for many years. Enterprises use these multifunctional communication platforms to pursue a wide variety of objectives. The purpose of this paper is to, on the one hand, to examine the extent to which trade shows are suitable as an instrument of live communication to meet specific communication objectives during the customer relationship cycle. On the other hand, it examines the way in which these objectives interrelate with each other.

Design/methodology/approach

Telephone surveys of around 400 marketing decision‐makers have been conducted every year since 2004. For analysing the data, bi‐variate longitudinal comparisons with t‐tests on significance were used as well as a correlation analysis with Spearman's Rho.

Findings

The results indicate that trade shows are suitable primarily as an instrument to nurture confidence in brands and to sustain customer loyalty, but less as an instrument to increase awareness levels. To improve the effectiveness of trade shows, complementary objectives should be targeted simultaneously.

Practical implications

The results can help marketing managers and exhibitors to combine all customer channels efficiently and fine‐tune the allocation of marketing resources in order to optimise “customer transfer” through every phase in the customer relationship cycle.

Originality/value

Though trade shows are widely acknowledged to be a valid multifunctional communication platform to pursue a wide variety of objectives, this paper is the first one to theoretically and practically address and analyse possible relationships which might occur between multiple communication objectives.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2013

Mads Bødker and David Browning

This chapter outlines opportunities for designing place-based or localized social media services and technologies for tourist settings. Following an exploration of how…

Abstract

This chapter outlines opportunities for designing place-based or localized social media services and technologies for tourist settings. Following an exploration of how ephemeral, collaborative social networks emerge, consideration is given to understanding tourist places in terms of networking and socialization. In the field of information technology design, there are many examples of experimental mobile, location-based services that provide informational overplays for tourism sites and generally seem to merely replicate the functions of guidebooks or online information services. However, viewing the performance of tourism through a lens that emphasizes place-making as a social practice could inspire the innovation and design of new mobile social technologies to enrich tourist places and interactions.

Details

Tourism Social Media: Transformations in Identity, Community and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-213-4

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2020

Thorsten Schwetje, Christiane Hauser, Stefan Böschen and Annette Leßmöllmann

The paper reports on a research project exploring the change in the organizational context of communicators and communication units in higher education and research…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper reports on a research project exploring the change in the organizational context of communicators and communication units in higher education and research institutions (HERIs), the importance of informal processes within their daily work and the great diversity of expectations communicators have to tackle.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on a literature review, a mixed-methods study combining expert interviews with 54 German HERI heads of communication units, an online-survey and a document analysis of organizational characteristics was conducted. Findings were validated in four focus groups.

Findings

The study illuminates the impact of organizational and operational structures of HERIs on communicators and their boundary spanning activities. Due to varying expectations of stakeholders, communicators constantly have to switch roles. Members of HERIs' executive boards affect status and working conditions for communicators in the organization.

Research limitations/implications

Interviews with other HERI actors, especially members of the executive board, are proposed to get more thorough insights into the organizational context of HERIs and the mutual expectations of different internal stakeholders.

Practical implications

Insights from the project may help HERI actors to reflect their organizational context and to identify potentially contentious structures or processes.

Originality/value

Communicating science sometimes clashes with complex organizational and operational structures. Despite the “organizational turn” in HERI research, there is a lack of data on the relation between communicators, their communication units and the larger organizational context. The exploratory study addresses this gap.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2020

Christiane M. Herr

This paper offers design cybernetics as a theoretical common ground to bridge diverging approaches to design as they frequently occur in collaborative design projects…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper offers design cybernetics as a theoretical common ground to bridge diverging approaches to design as they frequently occur in collaborative design projects. Focusing on the education of architects and structural engineers in China, the paper examines how compatible approaches to design can be established in both disciplines.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses relevant literature as well as observations from Chinese practice and academia. Design cybernetics is introduced and examined as a basis for establishing shared narratives to support cross-disciplinary collaborations involving architects and structural engineers.

Findings

Design cybernetics offers a body of vocabulary and a rich resource of strategies to address applied designing across design-oriented disciplines such as architecture and science-based disciplines such as structural engineering. The meta perspective of design cybernetics also provides a basis for the implementation of pedagogy supporting cross-disciplinary collaboration in applied design.

Research limitations/implications

The scope of the paper is limited to the examination of the theoretical framing as well as the implementation of pedagogy in the cultural and geographical context of China.

Practical implications

The paper outlines several design cybernetic strategies for pedagogy in support of cross-disciplinary collaborative design processes and illustrates their implementation in applied design education.

Originality/value

Addressing a significant and persistent gap between the two disciplines of architecture and structural engineering in the context of Chinese building practice, this paper examines the particularities of this context and presents an educational approach to support cross-disciplinary collaboration that has value in and beyond the context of China.

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2020

Maria Gruber, Christiane Mayer and Sabine A. Einwiller

Social media empower individuals to voice their opinions about issues that they perceive to be unacceptable. When many others add their opinions and large quantities of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Social media empower individuals to voice their opinions about issues that they perceive to be unacceptable. When many others add their opinions and large quantities of messages containing negative word-of-mouth suddenly spread online, an online firestorm occurs. By extending the situational theory of problem solving (Kim and Grunig, 2011) into the domain of online communication, this study aims to identify the drivers for participating in online firestorms.

Design/methodology/approach

With reference to a fictitious online firestorm trigger (i.e. perceived moral misconduct) posted on Facebook, a qualitative pre-study and quantitative online survey were conducted. Based on the responses of 410 participants, an ordinary least squares regression was modeled to examine the factors of participating in the online firestorm. Later, structural equation modeling was applied to test the model and gauge its fit with the data.

Findings

Participants' involvement recognition, perception of being collective actors and approval of slacktivism behaviors positively predicted their participation in the online firestorm, whereas non-anonymity hampered it.

Originality/value

The study's findings not only contribute to the current understandings of online firestorms but are also valuable for developing theory and forms of professional crisis management. Moreover, they offer insights into the factors of online communication environments that encourage users to voice their opinions.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 6 March 2017

Chia-Huei Wu, Amy Wei Tian, Aleksandra Luksyte and Christiane Spitzmueller

The purpose of this paper is to offer an autonomous motivation perspective to explore the relationship between perceived overqualification and adaptive work behavior and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer an autonomous motivation perspective to explore the relationship between perceived overqualification and adaptive work behavior and examine job autonomy as a factor that may moderate the association.

Design/methodology/approach

The hypotheses were tested in two culturally, demographically, and functionally diverse samples: sample 1 was based on North American community college employees (n=215); sample 2 was based on full-time workers, employed in a Chinese state-owned enterprise specializing in shipping (n=148).

Findings

In study 1, perceived overqualification was negatively related to self-rated adaptive behavior. A follow-up study 2 extended these findings by demonstrating that perceived overqualification was negatively related to supervisor-rated adaptive work behavior when job autonomy was low, rather than high.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this research offer an autonomous motivation perspective to explain why perceived overqualification relates to adaptive behavior and suggests a job design approach to encourage adaptive behaviors of people who feel overqualified – a sizable segment of the current workforce.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to explore adaptive behavior of workers who feel overqualified – an outcome that has not been examined in this domain. The findings further point out what can be done to encourage adaptive behaviors among overqualified employees.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 15 October 2018

Philip Baron and Christiane M. Herr

Discussing cybernetics as an enacted practice within specific contexts, this paper aims to identify key similarities and differences of two cybernetically informed…

Abstract

Purpose

Discussing cybernetics as an enacted practice within specific contexts, this paper aims to identify key similarities and differences of two cybernetically informed approaches to tertiary education in the distinct contexts of China and South Africa.

Design/methodology/approach

Making explicit and comparing two cybernetically informed educational approaches, the authors identify shared aspects as well as differences arising from their practice in social contexts that have differing norms and values.

Findings

The authors find that conversational settings for learning, immediacy of feedback, the key role of the teacher and assessment strategies that are matched to cybernetic learning and teaching strategies all constitute shared vital aspects of cybernetically informed teaching that are valid across two distinct educational contexts. Enacting these key aspects however requires careful adaptation to local contexts.

Research limitations/implications

Primarily qualitative in nature, this study is limited to the examination of two bodies of work conducted independently of each other in differing contexts.

Practical implications

Arising from the long-term examination of applied educational practice, findings discussed in the paper are intended to inform similar practice in other contexts. The authors however emphasise that enacted ethical practice requires careful adapting of learning and teaching strategies to local conditions.

Social implications

Based on the authors’ findings, the authors demonstrate the value of cybernetically informed tertiary education that emphasises ethical settings for learning on the basis of mutuality, equality and social inclusion.

Originality/value

Based on two bodies of work that consolidated practice-based insights independently of each other, this paper presents insights on cybernetically informed education that, shown to work well in two very different contexts, may offer a broader applicability.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 25 October 2019

Volker Stein, Arnd Wiedemann and Christiane Bouten

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of framing in the field of risk governance and risk management research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to apply the concept of framing in the field of risk governance and risk management research.

Design/methodology/approach

A five-constituent approach to framing – cognitive, strategic, action, emotional and institutional framing – is applied to contrastively analyze the multifaceted character of the two concepts of risk governance and risk management.

Findings

This paper analyzes the multifaceted utilization of risk governance framing and the conscious demarcation between risk governance and risk management. Risk governance framing strengthens the proactive control of strategic risks with regard to business model adaptation to changing risk landscapes. The verbal imagery of risk governance already sets the agenda for the sustainability-oriented as well as value-oriented steering of the risks of a business model. Following the analysis of the different framing areas, propositions are presented.

Originality/value

Although framing is applied in various academic disciplines, there is limited research relating to corporate risks. While risk governance provides companies with a concept to ensure the sustainability of their business models in the complex risk landscape, the related framing brings the appropriate interpretation and the deliberate tone into focus.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. 42 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

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Article
Publication date: 2 May 2017

Markus Voeth and Aline Christiane Lenzing

Renegotiations not only promise an economically relevant improvement of the original negotiation outcome for the communicator of the demand but also imply a potential…

Abstract

Purpose

Renegotiations not only promise an economically relevant improvement of the original negotiation outcome for the communicator of the demand but also imply a potential threat to the business relationship. The purpose of this paper is to examine the impact of renegotiations in detail and to provide practical implications for the optimal usage of renegotiations by analyzing potential renegotiation strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

Structural equation modelling was used to analyze the data of 255 negotiation experts collected via a standardized online questionnaire.

Findings

Social psychological outcome of renegotiations has the most relevant impact on relationship continuity (RC). The impact of economic outcomes is wholly mediated by the social psychological outcome. Regarding the use of different renegotiation strategies, other-oriented strategies and direct communication are most successful, whereas self-oriented strategies correlate negatively with all results.

Research limitations/implications

The study’s sample is drawn from Germany, which requires careful consideration of the results’ generalizability.

Practical implications

When demanding renegotiation, practitioners should apply strategies characterized by other-orientation and direct communication to increase the probability of RC. For the sake of the business relationship, self-oriented strategies should be avoided.

Originality/value

This paper presents the first detailed analysis of the impact of renegotiations on business relationships and investigates the effects of different renegotiation strategies on renegotiation outcomes and RC; hence, it is of great value for practical usage and may serve as a stepping stone for further research.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Abstract

Details

Key Success Factors of SME Internationalisation: A Cross-Country Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78754-277-8

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