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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Christian Yao, Jane Parker, James Arrowsmith and Stuart C. Carr

A “living” wage (LW) is conventionally defined as enabling meaningful participation in society above subsistence through, for example, recreation, supporting a family, and…

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Abstract

Purpose

A “living” wage (LW) is conventionally defined as enabling meaningful participation in society above subsistence through, for example, recreation, supporting a family, and savings. There is increasing debate over LWs due to growing inequality, rising living costs and welfare reform but this remains largely framed by the econometric cost-benefit parameters that apply to minimum wage regulation. The capabilities approach advocated by Sen (1999) offers a different perspective that is inclusive of choice, contingencies and the inter-connections between quality of (paid) work and private life. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper adopts this framework and utilises a qualitative exploration of the narratives of 606 New Zealand employees to understand perceived wage effectiveness. The results suggest that a focus on a specific LW rate might be conceptually limiting, in comparison to a LW range.

Findings

First, the findings indicate that there is a pivot range in which people move from self-assessed “survival” to “decent” income. Second, a LW may have more than a simply monetary effect in better meeting employees’ living costs; it can also improve well-being through subjective perceptions of valued freedoms to do with job satisfaction, equity and security.

Originality/value

The results thus draw attention to a wider notion of a LW in terms of personal and family well-being, utilising a capabilities approach, with implications for organisational practice, policy and theory concerning sustainable livelihood and the UN Sustainable Development Goals.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 June 2020

David R. Ellis, Kaye Thorn and Christian Yao

While there is a burgeoning literature on self-initiated expatriates (SIEs), the emphasis has been on expatriation not repatriation. The purpose of this paper therefore is…

Abstract

Purpose

While there is a burgeoning literature on self-initiated expatriates (SIEs), the emphasis has been on expatriation not repatriation. The purpose of this paper therefore is to explore how repatriating SIEs perceive the experience of repatriation compared with their pre-repatriation expectations. Further, we examine the seminal work of Black et al. (1992) in the light of current day realities.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative research draws on interviews with SIE New Zealanders returning home. It is an exploratory longitudinal study, based on interview data collected prior to (n = 32), and after (n = 27) repatriation, comparing expectations and experiences of repatriation.

Findings

Findings show that there is a strong level of congruence between the expectations of the return and their experience of repatriation. This congruence eases the transition and mitigates the impact of reverse culture shock. We revise Black et al.'s framework of repatriation adjustment to more accurately reflect the expectations and experiences of repatriating SIEs, recognising the importance of individual agency and the impact of today's technological advances on repatriation.

Research limitations/implications

The contributions of this paper include clarification of repatriating SIEs. Further, through the revision of the framework, we identify new areas of research that would aid our understanding of repatriating SIEs and lead to the development of a more detailed model. We highlight the interplay between variables showing how these might mitigate the shock of repatriation.

Originality/value

Repatriation is an under-researched phase of the SIE, and this study provides empirical data that contributes to our understanding of the construct. Black et al.'s framework of repatriation adjustment is revised in the context of contemporary SIE, highlighting the holistic nature of self-initiated expatriation and repatriation, viewing the events not as discrete, but as a continuum of time.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Christian Yao

The existing expatriation literature confirms that international assignments (IAs) are an essential tool for developing international talent and global managers but…

Abstract

Purpose

The existing expatriation literature confirms that international assignments (IAs) are an essential tool for developing international talent and global managers but relevant studies are conducted mainly in western developed contexts and neglect the effects on individuals from less developed countries such as China. This paper explores the concept of career and symbolic capital in Chinese multinational company context. It investigates the value of IAs by exploring the relationships between career capital and symbolic capital.

Design/methodology/approach

Twenty-eight semi-structured interviews with Chinese expatriates were conducted.

Findings

Results suggest that the value of individual career capital from IAs depends on the contexts and how different parties perceive the value. A model comprising individual, organisational and social dimensions are proposed along with mediating factors that affect the effectiveness of value transfer between career capital and symbolic capital. Implications are rehearsed, exposing areas for further research.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature by investigating the notion of career in an important but under-researched sample: Chinese expatriates. It helps to gain a better understanding on Chinese multinational companies and their employees.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 October 2014

Christian Yao, Kaye Thorn and Noeleen Doherty

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamic nature of boundaryless careers of Chinese early career corporate expatriates. It also investigates the demographic and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the dynamic nature of boundaryless careers of Chinese early career corporate expatriates. It also investigates the demographic and contextual factors influencing individual perceived career mobility.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative, semi-structured interviews with 31 Chinese corporate expatriates were conducted and a template analysis approach was used to analyze the data.

Findings

Results suggest that Chinese early career corporate expatriates’ perceptions of boundaries as facilitating or limiting career mobility change over time. Changing boundary properties are found to be linked to the salience of Chinese cultural values, demographics and career/life stages. Based on expatriates’ narratives, this study highlights how these demographic and contextual factors shape domains of career boundarylessness.

Originality/value

Using an under-researched sample of Chinese corporate expatriates, this paper contributes to the conceptualization of boundaryless careers identifying the changing nature of the boundaries that facilitate or restrict mobility over time. The study calls for the use of combined, multi-dimensional approaches incorporating individual agency, organizational and cultural factors to understand individual career development.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Christian Yao, Kaye Thorn, Zheng Duan and Nazim Taskin

– The purpose of this paper is to examine the relevance of personal and organisational factors contributing to workplace stress among Chinese migrants in New Zealand.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the relevance of personal and organisational factors contributing to workplace stress among Chinese migrants in New Zealand.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on surveys of 88 participants using the theoretical model of person-environment fit.

Findings

The results reveal that perceived fit of organisational factors has a significant impact on workplace stress outcomes including emotional well-being, work-related health, job performance and intention to quit. Further analysis also shows that personal factors, some as a result of acculturation, play a moderating effect on the perceived relationship between the organisation and workplace stress. Education, advanced language skills and building networks in the new community are all important factors to minimise stress.

Originality/value

From an organisational perspective, the study highlights the importance of understanding the factors that cause workplace stress, especially with a culturally diverse working population. This cross-sectional study could be furthered through the use of alternative cultural samples, and through the development of a longitudinal design. In short, this study of the work stress of Chinese migrants in New Zealand contributes to the field of knowledge providing exploratory insights for work stress research in human resource management.

Details

Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal, vol. 34 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7149

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Content available
Article
Publication date: 23 September 2013

Jan Selmer

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Abstract

Details

Journal of Global Mobility, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

Book part
Publication date: 30 January 2002

Y.S. Brenner

Abstract

Details

A Research Annual
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-137-8

Article
Publication date: 13 March 2009

Yung‐Tsan Jou, Hui‐Ming Wee, Hsiao‐Ching Chen, Yao‐Hung Hsieh and Laurence Wang

The purpose of this paper is to create a usable life forecast model for consumable parts using neural network approach. It focuses on a consumable probe card used in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to create a usable life forecast model for consumable parts using neural network approach. It focuses on a consumable probe card used in the semiconductor wafer testing operation. Referring to the relevant resources and the semiconductor testing operation, a fundamental concept is built to develop a probe card management system.

Design/methodology/approach

A neural network analysis software package, Q‐net2000, is applied in this study. In this case, there is one hidden layer and the neural network learning rates and momentum are set to 0.1 and 0.7. Forecast the usable life by inputting the initial values of the neural network variables into a back‐propagation neural network.

Findings

In this system, the first thing is to collect the production, maintenance and repair data, and then analyze those data by using a neural network methodology to effectively forecast a probe card's usable life. Those data are integrated to derive an optimum timing of placing a probe card order using an inventory control technique. Finally, the actual production data of a company are used to verify the feasibility of this research.

Research limitations/implications

The results presented are based on a representative expendable probe card manufacturing process in the Taiwan industry, a range of alternative scenarios and changes to the process design can be investigated using the simulation model.

Practical implications

For the semiconductor industry, the research supports the introduction on lifecycle forecast technology for expendable probe card manufacturing process.

Originality/value

The paper proposes a neural network forecast analysis to solve the case company's current management problem of determining the life cycle of probe cards in an earlier time.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Cheng‐Hsien Chen, Chan‐Hwang Chu, Yuan Kang, Yao‐Nan Huang and Jyh‐Tong Teng

This study examines the influence of the restriction parameters on the stability of a Jeffcott rotor supported by single‐row, six‐recessed hybrid bearings with orifice…

Abstract

This study examines the influence of the restriction parameters on the stability of a Jeffcott rotor supported by single‐row, six‐recessed hybrid bearings with orifice compensation. The Reynolds equation governing oil‐films is solved using the finite difference method, whilst the determination of stability of the Jeffcott rotor‐bearing system uses the Routh‐Hurwitz method. The load capacity, stability threshold, and the critical whirl ratio versus the changing restriction parameters, are each simulated for the shallow‐recessed bearing and the deep‐recessed bearing with various land‐width ratios. The simulation results indicate that with the appropriate design of restriction parameters and land‐width ratio, a deep‐recessed bearing may be relatively superior. Although the performance of a shallow‐recessed bearing is, by and large, superior to that of a deep‐recessed bearing, it does nevertheless hinge upon the design of both restrictor and bearing.

Details

Industrial Lubrication and Tribology, vol. 54 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0036-8792

Keywords

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