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Book part

Christopher D. Moore and Christabel L. Rogalin

Identifies where status and identity processes converge in social interaction and when one process may become more consequential than the other.

Abstract

Purpose

Identifies where status and identity processes converge in social interaction and when one process may become more consequential than the other.

Methodology/approach

Drawing upon existing experimental data, we illustrate how affect control theory and status characteristics theory make seemingly contradictory predictions in certain limited interactions and propose a theoretical framework to potentially reconcile these differences.

Findings

Three pivot points are identified at which status and identity processes meet and then one of the processes more strongly predicts interaction outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

The chapter represents a starting point for future research examining situations where status and identity processes converge.

Originality/value

We suggest ways to empirically test related claims made by both theories in an array of circumstances.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-041-1

Keywords

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Book part

Christabel L. Rogalin

This chapter seeks to theoretically answer the question: under which circumstances do groups succeed under female leadership? Further, is it possible to conceptualize the…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter seeks to theoretically answer the question: under which circumstances do groups succeed under female leadership? Further, is it possible to conceptualize the engineering of groups such that group success under female leadership is a likely outcome?

Design/methodology/approach

In this chapter, I draw on identity control theory (Burke & Stets, 2009; Stets & Burke, 2005) and role congruity theory (Eagly, 2003) to discuss the implications for female leaders of the discrepancy between the female gender identity and the leader identity. Next, I draw upon status characteristics theory (Berger et al., 1972) to further illustrate the negative consequences of being a female leader. Then, drawing on group processes research, I make the explicit link between the negative expectations for female leaders on group performance through the endorsement of group members. Finally, I utilize innovative research using institutionalization of female leadership to propose a possible solution for improving group performance.

Research implications

I present nine testable hypotheses ready for empirical test.

Social implications

I propose that training materials underscoring the skills that females have as leaders can subvert the development of conflictual expectations facing female leaders, thus removing the deleterious effects on group performance. That is, if group members receive training that emphasizes the competencies and skills women bring to the group’s task and to the leadership role, then group performance will not be threatened.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-976-8

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Book part

Michael J. Lovaglia, Shane D. Soboroff, Christopher P. Kelley, Christabel L. Rogalin and Jeffrey W. Lucas

To determine the age at which influence peaks for men and women at work, then use empirical data to develop procedures predicting complex combining effects of diffuse…

Abstract

Purpose

To determine the age at which influence peaks for men and women at work, then use empirical data to develop procedures predicting complex combining effects of diffuse status characteristics.

Methodology/approach

A survey experiment with a nationally representative sample is used to measure the age at which the status value of men and women at work reaches a maximum. Research results are then incorporated into equations adapted from current status characteristics theory (SCT) procedures to model the combined effects of age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, income, occupation, and beauty.

Findings

Analyses reveal that the status value of men and women reaches a maximum in middle age, and that women reach a maximum status value at work at an earlier age than men.

Research limitations/implications

This approach maintains core assumptions of SCT and uses ongoing research results to calibrate a model predicting complex combining effects of diffuse status characteristics. Limitations include the need to develop additional empirical constants to make predictions in new research settings.

Practical implications

Predictions from the model can be used in hiring situations to adjust for interviewers’ nonconscious expectations related to status characteristics of job applicants.

Social implications

The disadvantage for women at work that increases through mid-career helps to explain the continuing underrepresentation of women in senior leadership positions. Awareness of the impact of socially valued characteristics like age and gender can help individuals respond more effectively to challenging social situations.

Originality/value

Extend the current SCT model to make predictions in contexts where people are being evaluated such as elections, hiring, and promotions.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-192-8

Keywords

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Book part

Dawn T Robinson, Christabel L Rogalin and Lynn Smith-Lovin

After a vigorous debate in the late 1970s, the sociology of emotion put aside most discussion of whether or not the physiological arousal associated with emotion labels is…

Abstract

After a vigorous debate in the late 1970s, the sociology of emotion put aside most discussion of whether or not the physiological arousal associated with emotion labels is differentiated. Since this early period, scholars have made great progress on two fronts. First, theories about the interrelationship of identity, action and emotion have specified a family of new concepts related to emotion. Second, a large corpus of research on the physiological correlates of emotional experience emerged. In this chapter, we review the well-developed control theories of identity and emotion, and focus on the key concepts that might relate to different physiological states. We then review the general classes of physiological measures, discussing their reliability, intrusiveness and other features that might determine their usefulness for tracking responses to social interaction. We then offer a highly provisional mapping of physiological measures onto the concepts that they might potentially measure, given past research about how these physiological processes relate to environmental stimuli. While any linkage between concepts and measures must be speculative at this point, we hope that this review will serve as a stimulus to theoretically guided research that begins to assess the validity of these new measures for sociological use.

Details

Theory and Research on Human Emotions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-108-8

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Book part

Michael J. Lovaglia, Jeffrey W. Lucas, Christabel L. Rogalin and Abigail Darwin

Fundamental theories of power and status have developed sufficiently to apply in educational and organizational contexts. The path from basic theory to program development…

Abstract

Fundamental theories of power and status have developed sufficiently to apply in educational and organizational contexts. The path from basic theory to program development is neither simple nor direct. We trace the application of theoretical principles taken from network exchange theories of power as well as status characteristics and expectation states theories through the interdisciplinary field of leadership studies to applications that interrelate basic research, applied research, undergraduate educational programs, and organizational development. Two proposals result (1) a leadership training program that will produce university graduates with effective leadership skills, while also bringing diverse high school students to participate in a university program and (2) basic status characteristics research to explain the glass ceiling phenomenon.

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-330-3

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Book part

Jeffrey W. Lucas, Heather Ridolfo, Reef Youngreen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Layana Navarre-Jackson and Michael J. Lovaglia

Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender…

Abstract

Two studies investigate gender and status effects on self-handicapping: selecting actions that can impair future performances, perhaps to protect self-image. Gender socialization and status processes suggest two potential explanations for the consistent finding that men self-handicap more than women. If status differences contribute to the tendency to self-handicap, then holding gender constant, those with high status on other characteristics would self-handicap more than those with low status. In Study 1, men assigned to high-status positions selected less study time (and thus self-handicapped more) than did men assigned to low-status positions. Women assigned high status, however, self-handicapped no more than did women assigned low status. Because study time as a measure of self-handicapping may be confounded with confidence or motivation, a second study assigned status and measured self-handicapping by the selection of performance-enhancing or -detracting music. Study 2 also found that high status increased self-handicapping among men but not among women. Both gender socialization and status processes may play roles in self-handicapping.

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

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Book part

Kevin T. Leicht, Douglas Thompkins, Tina Wildhagen, Christabel L. Rogalin, Shane D. Soboroff, Christopher P. Kelley, Charisse Long and Michael J. Lovaglia

Beginning in 1982, the majority of college students have been women and that majority has increased since. Explanations for the predominance of women in college…

Abstract

Beginning in 1982, the majority of college students have been women and that majority has increased since. Explanations for the predominance of women in college enrollments and completion include a variety of labor-market factors that might now advantage men less than in the past. Avariety of labor-market analyses show that, while some recent developments may have reduced incentives for men to enroll in college, labor-market explanations alone cannot account for the predominance of women in college. Some of the reduced incentives for male college enrollment point to gender identities typical of young men and women as an important explanation for the predominance of women in college. Preliminary evidence for the gender identity explanation is offered. More controlled studies capable of testing and exploring the implications of the gender identity explanation are proposed.

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

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Abstract

Details

Advances in Group Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-192-8

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Abstract

Details

Theory and Research on Human Emotions
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-108-8

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Abstract

Details

Social Psychology of Gender
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1430-0

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