Search results

1 – 10 of 88
To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Abstract

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 23 November 2017

Georgiann Davis and Chris Wakefield

Historically, it has been common practice for doctors and parents to withhold the diagnosis from their minor intersex patients. This study seeks to integrate intersex…

Abstract

Purpose

Historically, it has been common practice for doctors and parents to withhold the diagnosis from their minor intersex patients. This study seeks to integrate intersex youth experiences into the growing body of literature on diagnosis disclosure for intersex patients.

Methodology/approach

Using gender structure theory as a model, 16 intersex youth were given in-depth surveys regarding their experiences with their intersex identity in individual, interactional, and institutional contexts.

Findings

Participants more positively experience intersex than the earlier generations of intersex people. They were not deeply troubled by their diagnosis as doctors have historically feared, and they are open about their diagnosis with their non-intersex peers and teachers. They also find peer support valuable.

Research limitations/implications

Data was collected from a single event and cannot represent all intersex youth. Future research must continue to engage with intersex youth experiences both inside of and beyond activist and support group networks.

Practical implications

These findings are strong exploratory evidence for the importance of diagnosis disclosure for intersex youth. Policies of withholding intersex diagnoses in clinical and familial contexts should be reevaluated in light of the experiences of intersex youth.

Social implications

Diagnosis disclosure for intersex youth creates the potential for increased medical decision-making participation and increased capacity for activism and community building around intersex issues.

Originality/value

Our results encourage future studies that center the experiences of intersex youth, for we conclude that theorizing the lived experiences of intersex people is incomplete without their perspectives.

Details

Gender, Sex, and Sexuality Among Contemporary Youth
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-613-6

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Jonathan Mark Wellum

This paper aims to look at the three areas of corporate governance, intellectual capital and strategic business valuation from the perspective of a long‐term value investor.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to look at the three areas of corporate governance, intellectual capital and strategic business valuation from the perspective of a long‐term value investor.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper begins by briefly laying out the investment tenets of a long‐term value investor and then proceeds to align long‐term value investing with long‐term stewardship of economic resources. The paper is a transcript of a keynote presentation delivered at the 1st McMaster World Congress on Strategic Business Valuation.

Findings

In the area of intellectual capital the paper points out that the concept of intellectual capital falls far short of the fuller and more necessary view on intellectual knowledge which should be replaced or at least augmented with the notion of wisdom.

Practical implications

Any notion of strategic valuation or pricing of assets based on their economic value will be significantly impacted by one's investment principles and time horizon. The paper mentions two examples of inefficiencies in the market due to divergent time horizons. The two examples discussed are income trusts and principal protected notes.

Originality/value

One's investment philosophy or principles which largely determine time horizon will have a significant impact on how one approaches the important areas of corporate governance, intellectual capital and strategic business valuation. The concern of the paper is to the extent that we have become more short‐term in our investment principles; this will have serious long‐term negative impacts on the capital markets.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 21 September 2015

Mark Button, Alison Wakefield, Graham Brooks, Chris Lewis and David Shepherd

– The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the ways in which contemporary organisations are imposing their own private sanctions on fraudsters.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate the ways in which contemporary organisations are imposing their own private sanctions on fraudsters.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on primary data from interviews with counter fraud practitioners in the UK, secondary sources and case examples.

Findings

Such developments have been stimulated, at least in part, by the broader limitations of the criminal justice system and in particular a “fraud bottleneck”. Alongside criminal sanctions, many examples are provided of organisations employing private prosecutions innovative forms of civil sanction and “pseudo state” sanctions, most commonly civil penalties comparable to fines.

Research limitations/implications

Such changes could mark the beginning of the “rebirth of private prosecution” and the further expansion of private punishment. Growing private involvement in state sanctions and the development of private sanctions represents a risk to traditional guarantees of justice. There are differences in which comparable frauds are dealt with by corporate bodies and thus considerable inconsistency in sanctions imposed. In contrast with criminal justice measures, there is no rehabilitative element to private sanctions. More research is needed to assess the extent of such measures, and establish what is happening, the wider social implications, and whether greater state regulation is needed.

Practical implications

Private sanctions for fraud are likely to continue to grow, as organisations pursue their own measures rather than relying on increasingly over-stretched criminal justice systems. Their emergence, extent and implications are not fully understood by researchers and therefore need much more research, consideration and debate. These private measures need to be more actively recognised by criminal justice policy-makers and analysts alongside the already substantial formal involvement of the private sector in punishment through prisons, electronic tagging and probation, for example. Such measures lack the checks and balances, and greater degree of consistency as laid out in sentencing guidelines, of the criminal justice system. In light of this, consideration needs to be given to greater state regulation of private sanctions for fraud. More also needs to be done to help fraudsters suffering problems such as debt or addiction to rebuild their lives. There is a strong case for measures beyond the criminal justice system to support such fraudsters to be created and publicly promoted.

Originality/value

The findings are of relevance to criminal justice policy-makers, academics and counter fraud practitioners in the public and private sectors.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 1 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Lloyd C. Harris and Chris Ezeh

This paper seeks better to conceptualise, operationalise and subsequently to test a multi‐dimensional and more social view of servicescape and the direct and moderated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks better to conceptualise, operationalise and subsequently to test a multi‐dimensional and more social view of servicescape and the direct and moderated linkages with loyalty intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research method was used to study servicescapes in the context of UK restaurants.

Findings

In furtherance of conceptualisation efforts, a model is developed to evaluate the linear influences of nine servicescape variables on customers' loyalty intentions. Additionally, the model appraises the impact of personal and environmental factors which moderate the servicescape‐loyalty intentions relationship. Analysis of survey responses finds a number of significant associations with loyalty intentions.

Practical implications

The results of the study indicate that practitioners should reflect carefully on a range of servicescape variables and judiciously manage such factors to improve the extent to which consumers are likely to foster positive intentions to be loyal.

Originality/value

The paper contributes a multi‐dimensional and more social framework of servicescape that is subsequently operationalised and tested. It also supplies a measure of servicescape that future researchers may find useful.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Kimiz Dalkir, Erica Wiseman, Michael Shulha and Susan McIntyre

The purpose of this paper is to provide an assessment framework for evaluating the success of knowledge management (KM) initiatives in a government setting.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an assessment framework for evaluating the success of knowledge management (KM) initiatives in a government setting.

Design/methodology/approach

The approach used was to first conduct a brief review of the leading thinking on KM and intellectual capital (IC) measurement approaches. The selection process used to recommend the results‐based management assessment framework (RMAF) as the most appropriate measurement framework is then discussed together with the development of logic models for all KM objectives. Finally, the validation methodology used, a survey design and data collection methodology, is described.

Findings

The study finds that the RMAF framework proved to be a good fit for KM assessment in a government setting.

Research limitations/implications

The evaluation of KM and IC are necessarily organization‐specific. Further research is needed to report on the generalizability of this evaluation approach.

Practical implications

The KM evaluation approach proposed here helped the government organization translate its KM strategy into action and enhanced management of the KM program. The proposed evaluation approach will help ensure that each type of stakeholder receives assessment results in a form that is of greatest use to them.

Originality/value

While there are many KM and IC metrics described in the literature, there have been limited attempts to address the evaluation question from a more holistic perspective. This paper shows how quantitative and qualitative measures can be combined to better assess the success of KM initiatives in a systematic and concrete manner.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Odilon Patrick Lemieux and John C. Banks

The purpose of this paper is to show how Sarbanes‐Oxley is motivating corporate boards to bring heightened scrutiny for all aspects of the acquisition process, including…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how Sarbanes‐Oxley is motivating corporate boards to bring heightened scrutiny for all aspects of the acquisition process, including valuation. This paper examines how in addition to the high‐tech M&A strategic objective, the decision on the post closing integration strategy should be considered as part of a target's firm valuation.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper argues that, within the high‐tech sector, the target firm characteristics in relation to the market are not sufficient for the basis of valuation. Planned management interventions, including the acquirer's management integration strategy decision, should also be considered. It further argues that intellectual capital retention, an important element of the target firm's valuation, is directly related to how closely the pace and degree of integration matches the acquirer's strategic objectives and the outcome of the due diligence.

Findings

Based on the findings from a set of interviews with M&A practitioners in the high‐tech field, due diligence, post closing integration planning and identity are viewed as important factors to the acquisition outcome. They appear not to be considered for the target firm valuation, which may result in an acquirer paying an excessive premium.

Practical implications

Finally the paper proposes a framework to guide high‐tech firms to select an integration strategy and its valuation impact in relation to the acquisition strategic objective, the due diligence outcome and the integration strategy.

Originality/value

The outcome of this project is raising the importance of due diligence and post integration strategy in relation to other factors that impact transaction outcome such as intellectual capital retention and valuation.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Jay Chatzkel and Hubert Saint‐Onge

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the goal of quantum leap breakthrough performance in acquisitions is to enable readers to achieve an unprecedented leap in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe how the goal of quantum leap breakthrough performance in acquisitions is to enable readers to achieve an unprecedented leap in performance as a result of major acquisitions.

Design/methodology/approach

This requires first, establishing acquisition readiness by developing a core set of capabilities and second, using a breakthrough approach that fuses both growth and expense cutting synergies to accomplish the quantum leap performance gains, especially during the integration stages. These capabilities enable the successful integration of the acquired organization and the emergence of the new entity.

Findings

The paper finds that those organizations that are going to win at this game are the ones that have the best capabilities for effecting the right acquisition and who can implement the best integration. Those capabilities are the name of the game.

Practical implications

The focus on capabilities is the prime distinguishing feature of quantum leap breakthrough performance in acquisitions. This is based on an organization developing the capabilities for core integration. Whether you are an integrator or a target, it is essential to have these capabilities.

Originality/value

If an organization wants to excel at developing, acquiring and integration, it needs have the following core set of capabilities: strategic agility, market agility, organization building, people management, project and process management and knowledge management, learning and innovation. When these capabilities interact with a set of six catalyzing springboards (i.e. customer strategy, organization strategy, integrating culture and leadership principles, a people strategy, integrating knowledge systems, and information technology architecture) the organization can achieve an extraordinary quantum leap in value.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Donovan Cox, Anne Wilcock and May Aung

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new measure for organization health. It is proposed that the Donohue tripartite paradigm model can be used to pierce the veneer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose a new measure for organization health. It is proposed that the Donohue tripartite paradigm model can be used to pierce the veneer of the satisficing account to identify the moral appraisal stakeholders have made of corporate strategies based on external (i.e. economic, etc.) standards.

Design/methodology/approach

A cognitive mapping process through narratives is used to operationalize a tripartite paradigm framework to measure human capital. An existential‐phenomenological approach is adopted to ensure the figural integrity of data.

Findings

This paper can be viewed as the prototypical development phase for a methodology to support future real‐time ethical inquiry concerning social responsibility within the corporate world.

Research limitations/implications

The tripartite paradigm model expressed by Donohue was intended for “real‐time” application. This study, however, proposed a retrospective analysis of stakeholder decision‐making within a firm as a means of unearthing any deficiencies that might block the operationalization of Donohue's generalist theory.

Practical implications

This appraisal can identify the conflict of conscience that characterizes a stakeholder's “lived‐worlds” based on their participation and exposure to company decision making. This diagnostic tool can assist stakeholders in identifying evidence of decline early enough in the history of an organization for proactive remedial action to be taken.

Originality/value

It is the hope of this study that the proposed cognitive mapping process can derive a measure of organizational health through an existential‐phenomenological approach to ensure the integrity of the data. Ultimately, the aim is that this will be a tool that can explore the phenomenon of misrepresentation and its effect on social cooperation within a market culture.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Sanjoy Bose and Keith Thomas

The purpose of this paper is to link two key disciplines in finance and science in a way which is representative of the many challenges in the development of the knowledge…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link two key disciplines in finance and science in a way which is representative of the many challenges in the development of the knowledge economy. However, the valuation of intangibles remains a contentious issue in finance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, the financial and economic issues pertaining to the valuation of intellectual capital are evaluated and addressed.

Findings

An important aspect of raising capital is the ability to impute a fair value on the asset.

Research limitations/implications

The investigative process involves evaluating and assessing the appropriateness and efficiency of current models and finds them to be inadequate in yielding the true value of intellectual capital employed in knowledge‐intensive firms.

Practical implications

A new methodology for valuation is indeed required, and this value driver valuation processes may produce significantly better understandings of the worth of intellectual capital in the knowledge economy.

Originality/value

This paper evaluates various methods that are currently used and recommends the development of a valuation process for new and evolving technologies.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

1 – 10 of 88