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Article
Publication date: 15 July 2020

Tachia Chin, Shouyang Wang and Chris Rowley

This study aims to characterise an intricate, idiosyncratic knowledge-creating mechanism in the modern digital context of cross-cultural business models (CBM). From an…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to characterise an intricate, idiosyncratic knowledge-creating mechanism in the modern digital context of cross-cultural business models (CBM). From an integrative socio-cultural and philosophical perspective, the authors suggest a novel concept of polychronic knowledge creation (PKC) and its metaphor to theorise such a complex phenomenon.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is conceptual in nature. It critically reviews the literature characterising the flourishing of information and communication technology (ICT)-driven CBMs and clarifies a research gap. The authors draw a dynamic conceptual framework describing how knowledge is created poly-chronically within CBMs, while also articulating and justifying the occurrence of knowledge icebergs as a manifestation of critical cognitive variances and biases in such contexts.

Findings

Building upon existential phenomenology, the authors regard the sea as a parable of the CBM ecosystem and propose the new notion of PKC as a dynamic time-space synthesis and its associated sea-like heuristic metaphor. These elucidate how the intricate interconnectivity of a focal firm with its diverse strategic partners kindles a discursive, multi-path knowledge creation process in ICT-driven CBMs under multiple jurisdictions with manifold cultures.

Research limitations/implications

Implications regarding the role of cross-cultural management in creating new knowledge within CBMs are provided.

Originality/value

The research complements and enriches Nonaka’s (1994) theory and its underlying metaphor “ba” (by incorporating the abstruse yet vital role of culture in the synthesizing process of knowledge creation) to propose the novel ideas of PKC and the sea-like heuristic metaphor in CBMs.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Tuan Luu, Chris Rowley, Sununta Siengthai and Vo Thanh Thao

Notwithstanding the rising magnitude of system factors in patient safety improvement, “human factors” such as idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) which also contribute to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Notwithstanding the rising magnitude of system factors in patient safety improvement, “human factors” such as idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) which also contribute to the adjustment of system deficiencies should not be neglected. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of value-based HR practices in catalyzing i-deals, which then influence clinical error control. The research further examines the moderating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the effect of value-based HR practices on i-deals.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from middle-level clinicians from hospitals in the Vietnam context.

Findings

The research results confirmed the effect chain from value-based HR practices through i-deals to clinical error control with CSR as a moderator.

Originality/value

The HRM literature is expanded through enlisting i-deals and clinical error control as the outcomes of HR practices.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Chris Rowley

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408

Abstract

Details

Journal of Chinese Human Resource Management, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8005

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2018

Tachia Chin, Chris Rowley, Gordon Redding and Shouyang Wang

Grounded in Yijing, the wellspring of Chinese philosophies, this research aims to propose a novel interpretation of the indigenous Yin-Yang harmony cognitive framework…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded in Yijing, the wellspring of Chinese philosophies, this research aims to propose a novel interpretation of the indigenous Yin-Yang harmony cognitive framework, and to elaborate on how to use it as a meta-theorising tool to characterise the conflicting yet complementary dynamics of strategy, commonly seen as the prominent feature of Chinese strategic thinking.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the Yin-Yang harmony approach (i.e. Yin as the endogenous factors and Yang the exogenous factors), the authors first put forward eight paradoxical situations facing Chinese organisations as per the changing paradigm of Yijing. Then the authors use the thick description model as a roadmap to identify three evolving trajectories in Chinese higher education (HE) system. Finally, they raise four strategic propositions regarding how competing HE institutes handle the conflicting yet complementary dynamics in China.

Findings

Results show that the main strategic choices used by two different types of higher education institutes to cope with the current high-level uncertainty and competition could be described in terms of the two “Qian” and “Li” strategic situations, respectively. More details are discussed in the four propositions.

Research limitations/implications

This research brings potentially valuable implications for global regulators, policymakers, providers and other stakeholders through better understanding of HE-related issues, as well as certain distinct conceptual complexities in terms of developing strategies in China. It implies potentially significant differences in cognition between East and West, and illustrates what may be their workings.

Originality/value

This indigenous eight-dimensional paradigm demonstrates the conflicting yet complementary dynamic gestalt of organisational strategic choices that may only be realised in Chinese terms, and that cannot be elucidated by theories purely derived from Western experience. It thus can foster the transfer of understanding between the East and West and open a new chapter for future research.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Tuan Trong Luu and Chris Rowley

Cultural intelligence is the capacity to decode and harmonize with another culture for cultural synergy effects. This paper aims to examine whether cultural intelligence…

Abstract

Purpose

Cultural intelligence is the capacity to decode and harmonize with another culture for cultural synergy effects. This paper aims to examine whether cultural intelligence can activate idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) through trust as a mediator and HR localization as a moderator.

Design/methodology/approach

Cross-sectional data from respondents from joint ventures or 100 per cent foreign-invested firms in Vietnam business setting, which were tested through the structural equation modeling, provide the evidence for the research model.

Findings

Research results confirmed the positive effect of cultural intelligence on identity-based trust and knowledge-based trust, which in turn influence i-deals. HR localization was also found to play a moderating role on the relationship between identity-based trust or knowledge-based trust and i-deals.

Originality/value

Cultural intelligence literature, from this study, is further deepened through its role as a trigger for the path from cultural intelligence to i-deals.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Tuan Trong Luu, Chris Rowley and Khai Cong Dinh

When public employees demonstrate ambidexterity in serving customers, through efficiently providing customers with current public services as well as exploring ways to…

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1056

Abstract

Purpose

When public employees demonstrate ambidexterity in serving customers, through efficiently providing customers with current public services as well as exploring ways to create more, new public service solutions for customers, they may activate customers’ co-creating value with the public organization. The purpose of this research is to examine the role of public employees’ individual ambidexterity in promoting customer value co-creation. This research also seeks to investigate the levers behind individual ambidexterity, including ambidextrous leadership as an antecedent and public service motivation (PSM) as an enhancer for the leadership effect.

Design/methodology/approach

Public employees from public legal service agencies and customer companies they had served have been invited to participate and provide data for this research. The data collated have been analyzed using multilevel structural equation modeling approach.

Findings

Ambidextrous leadership was positively associated with frontline public employees’ individual ambidexterity. This positive association was enhanced by PSM among frontline public employees. In turn, frontline public employees’ individual ambidexterity demonstrated a positive link with customer value co-creation through the mediation mechanisms of customer–employee identification and customer–organization identification.

Originality/value

This research extends and marks the convergence between ambidexterity and customer value co-creation research streams.

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Bang Nguyen, Kirk Chang, Chris Rowley and Arnold Japutra

The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) by combining two heterogeneous perspectives, integrating OCB-related factors at work…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) by combining two heterogeneous perspectives, integrating OCB-related factors at work using both personal and organizational perspectives, thus contributing to the knowledge of OCB.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies are conducted using surveys in Taiwan with a snowball sampling technique to enlarge participation. Study 1 analyzes the relationships between organizational identification (OID), expected psychological contract (PC), perceived PC (PPC) and OCB. Study 2 analyzes the relationship between OCB and principals’ (or head teachers’) leadership frames (LFs).

Findings

Study 1 finds that OID is an antecedent of OCB and that expected PC (EPC) moderates the OID-OCB relationship. Study 2 finds that the symbolic LF is the only antecedent of OCB and that different LFs influence each other in predicting OCB. EPC is found to moderate the OID-OCB relationship, indicating that primary school teachers’ (PSTs) with higher levels of EPC are more likely to demonstrate OCB at school. Interestingly, PPC did not demonstrate such a moderating effect.

Originality/value

The study makes three contributions. First, the authors analyze composite OCB via identity and PC theories (Study 1). Second, the authors scrutinize specific aspects of OCB via leader-member-exchange and LF theories. These aspects include assisting colleagues, job commitment, working morale and non-selfish behavior (Study 2). Third, the authors increase understanding of PSTs’ OCB, discussing important implications for school principals and human resource managers as well as perhaps others in similar sectors.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

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Article
Publication date: 20 September 2011

Johngseok Bae, Shyh‐Jer Chen and Chris Rowley

Human resource management (HRM) practices have been re‐evaluated under the pressures and constraints of factors such as globalization, inward and outward investment…

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2919

Abstract

Purpose

Human resource management (HRM) practices have been re‐evaluated under the pressures and constraints of factors such as globalization, inward and outward investment patterns, multinational companies (MNCs), indigenous cultures and institutions. This paper aims to compare changes and continuities in key aspects of HRM in South Korea and Taiwan. It examines the impacts on HRM policies ‐ particularly employment security, extensive training, performance based pay and employee influence ‐ and the role of a core‐periphery model. Time effects, country effects and the interaction between them are explored.

Design/methodology/approach

The research was undertaken across a decade at three time periods between 1996 and 2005 and in both locally‐owned firms and MNC subsidiaries using questionnaires.

Findings

The authors find, first, recognizable general patterns over time; second, significant interaction effects of country and time; third, some HRM practices more culturally bounded than others.

Practical implications

These include issues relating to companies using more core‐periphery and performance based employment.

Originality/value

The paper makes use of an under‐used perspective, both comparative and longitudinal, at three time periods in two under‐researched contexts of South Korea and Taiwan.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 40 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 17 April 2007

Li Xue Cunningham and Chris Rowley

The purpose of this article is to emphasise the development, importance and pressures on the under‐researched area of Chinese small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and…

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8621

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to emphasise the development, importance and pressures on the under‐researched area of Chinese small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) and human resource management (HRM) and provide a review and research agenda, especially relating to the debate on convergence vis‐à‐vis divergence.

Design/methodology/approach

Recent research papers are discussed and possible convergence and the pressures on HRM and its practice in Chinese SMEs are examined. Key elements in Chinese HRM are highlighted. Four main dimensions of HRM are compared in terms of western and Chinese characteristics and their cultural impacts and problems. A conceptual framework to locate influences on Chinese HRM is outlined as well as a set of propositions for future research and examination of key HRM areas.

Findings

The continuing influences on HRM suggest that a distinctly Chinese HRM approach combining western practice with Chinese characteristics may be one way for SMEs to develop.

Originality/value

It is central to a better understanding of Chinese SMEs and helps fill some of the gap in the analysis of HRM in Chinese SMEs. It also offers insights which managers, policy makers and Chinese government can use to construct and reform the supporting system for SMEs.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2001

Jung‐Won Kim and Chris Rowley

The Korean economy has moved from being a role model, with various impediments to its future development now identified. Some of the problems concern its manufacturing…

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1545

Abstract

The Korean economy has moved from being a role model, with various impediments to its future development now identified. Some of the problems concern its manufacturing nationalized industries with debate over their “efficiency”, with high costs of production, wastage of materials and human resources, combined with poor quality. At the same time, there is also a feeling that nationalized industries are not discharging their “responsibilities” to society. While the focus of this paper is a segment of Korean management and business, it has more general and wider relevance to other sectors and counties. The main purposes of this study are to highlight the environmental factors under which nationalized industries operate; draw attention to problems stemming from them that negatively affect efficiency and management; and make some tentative recommendations for possible reforms.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

1 – 10 of 132