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Article
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Simplice Asongu, Sara le Roux, Jacinta Nwachukwu and Chris Pyke

The purpose of this paper is to investigate loan price and quantity effects of information sharing offices with information and communication technology (ICT), in a panel…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate loan price and quantity effects of information sharing offices with information and communication technology (ICT), in a panel of 162 banks consisting of 42 African countries for the period 2001–2011.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical evidence is based on a panel of 162 banks in 42 African countries for the period 2001–2011. Misspecification errors associated with endogenous variables and unobserved heterogeneity in financial access are addressed with generalized method of moments and instrumental quantile regressions.

Findings

The findings uncover several major themes. First, ICT when integrated with the role of public credit registries significantly lowered the price of loans and raised the quantity of loans. Second, while the net effects from the interaction of ICT with private credit bureaus (PCBs) do not improve financial access, the corresponding marginal effects show that ICT could complement the characteristics of PCBs to reduce loan prices and increase loan quantity, but only when certain thresholds of ICT are attained. The authors compute and discuss the policy implications of these ICT thresholds for banks with low, intermediate and high levels of financial access.

Originality/value

This is one of the few studies to assess how the growing ICT can be leveraged in order to reduce information asymmetry in the banking industry with the ultimate aim of improving financial access in a continent where lack of access to finance is a critical policy syndrome.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2019

Simplice Asongu, Jacinta Nwachukwu, Stella-Maris Orim and Chris Pyke

The purpose of this paper is to complement the scant macroeconomic literature on the development outcomes of social media by examining the relationship between Facebook…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to complement the scant macroeconomic literature on the development outcomes of social media by examining the relationship between Facebook penetration and violent crime levels in a cross-section of 148 countries for the year 2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical evidence is based on ordinary least squares (OLS), Tobit and quantile regressions. In order to respond to policy concerns on the limited evidence on the consequences of social media in developing countries, the data set is disaggregated into regions and income levels. The decomposition by income levels included: low income, lower middle income, upper middle income and high income. The corresponding regions include: Europe and Central Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, Middle East and North Africa (MENA), Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

Findings

From OLS and Tobit regressions, there is a negative relationship between Facebook penetration and crime. However, quantile regressions reveal that the established negative relationship is noticeable exclusively in the 90th crime quantile. Further, when the data set is decomposed into regions and income levels, the negative relationship is evident in the MENA while a positive relationship is confirmed for Sub-Saharan Africa. Policy implications are discussed.

Originality/value

Studies on the development outcomes of social media are sparse because of a lack of reliable macroeconomic data on social media. This study primarily complemented three existing studies that have leveraged on a newly available data set on Facebook.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Simplice Asongu, Sara le Roux, Jacinta C. Nwachukwu and Chris Pyke

The purpose of this paper is to present theoretical and empirical arguments for the role of mobile telephony in promoting good governance in 47 sub-Saharan African…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present theoretical and empirical arguments for the role of mobile telephony in promoting good governance in 47 sub-Saharan African countries for the period 2000–2012.

Design/methodology/approach

The empirical inquiry uses an endogeneity-robust GMM approach with forward orthogonal deviations to analyze the linkage between mobile phone usage and the variation in three broad governance categories – political, economic and institutional.

Findings

Three key findings are established: first, in terms of individual governance indicators, mobile phones consistently stimulated good governance by the same magnitude, with the exception of the effect on the regulation component of economic governance. Second, when indicators are combined, the effect of mobile phones on general governance is three times higher than that on the institutional governance category. Third, countries with lower levels of governance indicators are catching-up with their counterparts with more advanced dynamics.

Originality/value

The study makes both theoretical and empirical contributions by highlighting the importance of various combinations of governance indicators and their responsiveness to mobile phone usage.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Riccardo Armillei and Bruno Mascitelli

Until the early 1970s the infamous ‘White Australia Policy’ restricted certain types of migrants from entering Australia, particularly those of Asian background, with the…

Abstract

Until the early 1970s the infamous ‘White Australia Policy’ restricted certain types of migrants from entering Australia, particularly those of Asian background, with the goal of creating an ‘Anglo-Celtic’ Australian nation. Post-war mass migration, mostly from Europe, had a significant impact on the ethnic composition of the population. Despite attempts to enforce a mostly ‘British’ migration, the resulting programme would see migrants come from many non-British source countries. This ultimately pressured the government into recognition of cultural diversity and eventually in the early 1970s through the proposition of a multicultural approach. In 1973 multiculturalism was officially introduced slowly becoming a defining national asset. From 1933 to 2001, Italians were the second largest migrant group contributing to Australia’s cultural ‘make-up’, right after the ‘Anglo-Celtic’ segment of the overseas-born population (UK, New Zealand and Ireland). However, the Italian migration of the 1950s and 1960s is a closed chapter of Australian migration history, and Australia now embraces migration from countries where it was initially rejected in the pre-1970s period – Asians, particularly those from China and India. While looking at the specific cases of Italian and Chinese settlement in Australia, this chapter also provides an historical overview of Australian migration policies. We argue that the gradual inclusion of non-British migrants in Australia has been guided since 1901 Federation by a form of ‘economic opportunism’ rather than a real intention to change the ethnic make-up of the population and identity of the nation. Despite forming and maintaining strategic partnerships with Asian countries, migration to Australia is still dominated by the need to preserve a distinctive ‘Anglo-Celtic’ character.

Details

Living in Two Homes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-781-6

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2018

Rachel Trees and Dianne Marion Dean

This purpose of this study is to examine the fluidity of family life which continues to attract attention. This is increasingly significant for the intergenerational…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this study is to examine the fluidity of family life which continues to attract attention. This is increasingly significant for the intergenerational relationship between adult children and their elderly parents. Using practice theory, the aims are to understand the role of food in elderly families and explore how family practices are maintained when elderly transition into care.

Design/methodology/approach

A phenomenological research approach was used as the authors sought to build an understanding of the social interactions between family and their lifeworld.

Findings

This study extends theory on the relationship between the elderly parent and their family and explores through practice theory how families performed their love, how altered routines and long standing rituals provided structure to the elderly relatives and how care practices were negotiated as the elderly relatives transitioned from independence to dependence and towards care. A theoretical framework is introduced that provides guidance for the transition stages and the areas for negotiation.

Research limitations/implications

This research has implications for food manufacturers and marketers, as the demand for healthy food for the elderly is made more widely available, healthy and easy to prepare. The limitations of the research are due to the sample located in East Yorkshire only.

Practical implications

This research has implications for brand managers of food manufacturers and supermarkets that need to create product lines that target this segment by producing healthy, convenience food.

Social implications

It is also important for health and social care policy as the authors seek to understand the role of food, family and community and how policy can be devised to provide stability in this transitional and uncertain lifestage.

Originality/value

This research extends the body of literature on food and the family by focussing on the elderly cared for and their family. The authors show how food can be construed as loving care, and using practice theory, a theoretical framework is developed that can explain the transitions and how the family negotiates the stages from independence to dependence.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Raffaella Cagliano, Kate Blackmon and Chris Voss

Although the importance of operations in reaching world‐class competitiveness has been highlighted in the operations management literature, small and medium‐sized…

Abstract

Although the importance of operations in reaching world‐class competitiveness has been highlighted in the operations management literature, small and medium‐sized companies (SMEs) have been found to have a poor uptake of world‐class practices. Reports on a study of 285 SMEs located in Italy, the UK, and other northern European countries. The data are taken from the MICROSCOPE facilitated self‐assessment benchmarking database, which studied operations practices and performance in small firms. The level of world‐class practices and performance was compared across companies by company size and by country of origin. Significant differences were found between “micro” companies (fewer than 20 employees) and larger companies (between 20 and 200 employees). Other significant differences were found by country, which may be attributed to differences in regional policies and infrastructures regarding small firms.

Details

Integrated Manufacturing Systems, vol. 12 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-6061

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1968

TODAY the words ‘Productivity Agreement’ are among the small change of contemporary conversation. They provide the text for many political sermons and are the main…

Abstract

TODAY the words ‘Productivity Agreement’ are among the small change of contemporary conversation. They provide the text for many political sermons and are the main debating point across conference tables. They intrude into newspapers almost daily and are regarded in some quarters as a talisman or amulet capable of working wonders.

Details

Work Study, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0043-8022

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2011

Noel Scott, Rodolfo Baggio and Chris Cooper

This chapter discusses the emerging network science approach to the study of complex adaptive systems and applies tools derived from statistical physics to the analysis of…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the emerging network science approach to the study of complex adaptive systems and applies tools derived from statistical physics to the analysis of tourism destinations. The authors provide a brief history of network science and the characteristics of a network as well as different models such as small world and scale free networks, and dynamic properties such as resilience and information diffusion. The Italian resort island of Elba is used as a case study allowing comparison of the communication network of tourist organizations and the virtual network formed by the websites of these organizations. The study compares the parameters of these networks to networks from the literature and to randomly created networks. The analyses include computer simulations to assess the dynamic properties of these networks. The results indicate that the Elba tourism network has a low degree of collaboration between members. These findings provide a quantitative measure of network performance. In general, the application of network science to the study of social systems offers opportunities for better management of tourism destinations and complex social systems.

Details

Tourism Sensemaking: Strategies to Give Meaning to Experience
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-853-4

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Ruiliang Yan, Chris Anthony Myers and John Wang

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to help the manufacturers to find the optimal decisions regarding the choice of channel member for information sharing.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a framework to help the manufacturers to find the optimal decisions regarding the choice of channel member for information sharing.

Design/methodology/approach

A game‐theoretical model plus Bayesian forecasting is developed to determine the optimal decisions for the manufacturer.

Findings

The results show that the optimal strategy for the manufacturer is to engage in information sharing with one small retailer exclusively, such that the manufacturer can gain the most benefit from information sharing arrangement in a marketing channel with a dominant retailer.

Research limitations/implications

The present study is analyzed by a theoretical model. Future research can explore the same study by collecting data to engage in an empirical test.

Practical implications

This paper provides a useful model framework and pricing strategy for upstream manufacturers who are engaging or planning to engage in information sharing with their retailers.

Originality/value

This paper provides practical and solid advice and examples demonstrating the optimal decisions regarding the choice of channel member for information sharing to best benefit of the manufacturer.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

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Article
Publication date: 16 May 2020

Madelon Willemsen, Julien Pollack and Chivonne Algeo

There are significant, ongoing threats of species extinction. Threatened species recovery programs are an important way of reducing this threat, but many recovery programs…

Abstract

Purpose

There are significant, ongoing threats of species extinction. Threatened species recovery programs are an important way of reducing this threat, but many recovery programs are unsuccessful. The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues facing species recovery programs, and the potential benefits to be found in managing threatened species recovery from a project management perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used the Grounded Theory Method to analyze the contents of four senate inquiries and 21 interviews with recovery experts. The Grounded Theory Method was then used to inductively develop concepts and theories that explain some of the issues faced in the delivery of recovery programs in Australia. These were explored from a project management perspective, to understand ways that project management could provide benefit to the recovery planning process.

Findings

Eight core challenges that have an impact on recovery emerged from the data. It was identified that there is a general lack of integration of project management into the recovery process. This was found to be particularly evident in terms of the recovery project lifecycle, risk management and stakeholder management. Strategies for addressing these issues are discussed.

Originality/value

Conservation scientists typically focus on technical recovery competencies. The authors argue that managing recovery from a project management perspective will increase recovery success rates through an increased focus on the contextual and behavioral competencies that are essential to the management and delivery of recovery projects and programs.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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