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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Gordon Dunsire and Chris Pinder

The Dynix system was purchased by Napier Polytechnic of Edinburgh in March 1990, replacing a mixture of manual and small‐scale automated processes. The paper outlines the…

Abstract

The Dynix system was purchased by Napier Polytechnic of Edinburgh in March 1990, replacing a mixture of manual and small‐scale automated processes. The paper outlines the reasons behind the choice, describes the implementation of the system to date, and discusses the library's development plans. The system is integrated with the Polytechnic network and public access microcomputers in the three major campus libraries.

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Program, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1998

Chris Pinder

Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 47 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Chris Pinder

Abstract

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Library Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Chris Pinder

The article surveys the general academic library response within the UK to disability legislation and the growing numbers of students declaring disabilities entering…

Abstract

Purpose

The article surveys the general academic library response within the UK to disability legislation and the growing numbers of students declaring disabilities entering higher education.

Design/methodology/approach

Following a brief review of the provisions of legislation, particularly the Spe,"Integrated Manufacturing Systems" }Integrated_Manufacturing_Systemscial Educational Needs And Disability Act of 2001, and the response of funding and other bodies, the article addresses specific regional – that is, collaborative – and individual institutional initiatives.

Findings

Responses from libraries are found to be very positive and offer a service‐level benchmark to libraries in other sectors or elsewhere.

Research limitations/implications

This is a geographically focussed paper, looking at the UK and in particular the Scottish position, and other countries may present different findings.

Practical implications

An account of the implementation of a variety of initiatives aimed at disabled users, with much relevance to practitioner concerns.

Originality/value

The paper gives a valuable overview of the progress made in academic libraries to date on disability issues in Scotland, and in the UK, and shows that both the legislation combined with the inherent customer‐service values of the library profession have helped raise the standard of library performance in this regard.

Details

Library Review, vol. 54 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0024-2535

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Abstract

Details

Program, vol. 37 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 11 July 2019

Marie-France Waxin, Chris Brewster and Nicolas Ashill

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct impact of individual variables (cultural openness, social orientation, willingness to communicate, confidence in own…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the direct impact of individual variables (cultural openness, social orientation, willingness to communicate, confidence in own technical abilities, active stress resistance, prior international experience) on expatriate time to proficiency (TTP); and the moderating effects of the home country on the relationships between these individual variables and expatriate TTP.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors use a quantitative, self-administered questionnaire to gather data from assigned expatriates from different countries in India, analysed through partial least squares.

Findings

The findings show that, first, four individual variables, i.e. social orientation, willingness to communicate, confidence in technical abilities and active stress resistance reduce expatriate TTP in the global sample. Second, the individual antecedents of expatriate TTP vary significantly across home countries.

Research limitations/implications

The results confirm the importance of individual antecedents in explaining expatriate TTP and the importance of context in the study of expatriates’ cross-cultural effectiveness. The authors also propose new, shorter measures for the individual antecedents.

Practical implications

The practical implications for HRM professionals relate mainly to selection and cross-cultural training. Expatriates may also get a better understanding of the individual and contextual variables that impact their TTP.

Originality/value

The authors show that individual antecedents interact with context, here home country, to predict expatriate TTP in an under-researched host country, India.

Details

Journal of Global Mobility: The Home of Expatriate Management Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2049-8799

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Andrew R. Timming, Chris Baumann and Paul Gollan

The paper aims to examine the effect of employees' perceived physical attractiveness on the extent to which their voices are “listened to” by management.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the effect of employees' perceived physical attractiveness on the extent to which their voices are “listened to” by management.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental research design, the paper estimates main effects of employee attractiveness and possible moderating effects of employee race and gender as well as the gender of their “managers.”

Findings

The results suggest that, with few exceptions, more physically attractive employees are significantly more likely to have their suggestions acted upon by managers than less attractive employees, pointing to a powerful form of workplace discrimination. This finding holds across races, with more attractive white, black, and Asian employees exerting a more impactful voice than their less attractive counterparts, although the moderation appears to be stronger for whites than ethnic minorities.

Research limitations/implications

The results have important implications for the extant literatures on employee voice, diversity and discrimination.

Originality/value

This is among the first studies to demonstrate that less attractive employees suffer from an “employee voice deficit” vis-à-vis their more attractive counterparts.

Details

Journal of Participation and Employee Ownership, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-7641

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Book part
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Elisabeth Kastenholz, Celeste Eusébio, Elisabete Figueiredo and Joana Lima

Tourism destinations are facing intense and increasing competition worldwide, while consumers are ever more demanding, requiring not only service quality but also socially…

Abstract

Tourism destinations are facing intense and increasing competition worldwide, while consumers are ever more demanding, requiring not only service quality but also socially responsible and sustainable destinations. In this context, developing accessible tourism at a destination may help gain competitiveness in an underserved, typically most loyal market. Developing accessible tourism may also create a culture of social responsibility. This would enhance a shared, human and involving vision of the destination amongst stakeholders, including tourists who increasingly value socially responsible positions of economic actors in the tourism industry. The development of this approach is shown for Lousã, a small tourism destination focusing on accessible tourism as a core of its development strategy, a strategy developed through a stakeholder participatory approach. In this chapter, we present a study that helped develop the strategic positioning of Lousã, combining qualitative and quantitative methods and integrating visions of several relevant stakeholders.

Details

Field Guide to Case Study Research in Tourism, Hospitality and Leisure
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-742-0

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Abstract

Details

Program, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0033-0337

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1985

LESLIE R BALDWIN, BRIAN REDFERN, OWEN SURRIDGE, TERRY HANSTOCK, TONY WARSHAW, EDWIN FLEMING, ALLAN BUNCH and WILFRED ASHWORTH

While I agree with the broad theme of Jane Little's article in June NLW that there are not enough women in senior library posts, I feel that at least some of her points…

Abstract

While I agree with the broad theme of Jane Little's article in June NLW that there are not enough women in senior library posts, I feel that at least some of her points must be challenged.

Details

New Library World, vol. 86 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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