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Article
Publication date: 23 January 2019

Jonathan Jones, Céline Souchay, Chris Moulin, Shirley Reynolds and Anna-Lynne Adlam

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for common mental health problems that affect children, young people and adults. The suitability of CBT…

Abstract

Purpose

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) is an evidence-based treatment for common mental health problems that affect children, young people and adults. The suitability of CBT for children has been questioned because it requires children to think about their thoughts, feelings and behaviours. The purpose of this paper is to investigate which cognitive and affective capacities predict children’s ability to relate thoughts, feelings and behaviours.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 59 typically developing children aged between 8 and 11 years took part in the study. CBT skills were assessed on a story task that required children to relate the character’s thoughts to their feelings and behaviours. Children also completed an assessment of IQ, a feeling-of-knowing metamemory task that assessed metacognition, and a higher-order theory of mind task. Furthermore, parents rated their child’s empathy on the children’s empathy quotient.

Findings

The findings suggest that CBT is developmentally appropriate for 8–11 year old children; however, young children and children with mental health problems may have impaired metacognition and CBT skills. Metacognition and empathy may moderate the efficacy of child CBT and warrant further investigation in clinical trials.

Originality/value

This study provides evidence for the cognitive and affective skills that might predict the outcome of CBT in children. Metacognition and empathy predict children’s ability to relate thoughts, feelings and behaviours, and therefore may moderate the efficacy of CBT.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Chris Trevitt, Aliya Steed, Lynn Du Moulin and Tony Foley

The study aims to review the entrepreneurial and educational innovations in technology-enabled distance education in practical legal education (PLE) accomplished by a unit…

Abstract

Purpose

The study aims to review the entrepreneurial and educational innovations in technology-enabled distance education in practical legal education (PLE) accomplished by a unit “on the periphery” of a strong research-led university. It also aims to examine the learning organisation (LO) attributes associated with this initiative.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a longitudinal case study based on interviews and reflective analysis, and reviewed using three “models” drawn from the literature: breaking the “iron triangle” (containing costs; widening access; enhancing quality); a tailored version of distance education appropriate for research-intensive universities; a strategy for successful adoption of disruptive technologies in higher education.

Findings

Entrepreneurialism yielded growth (PLE student numbers went from 150 to 2,000 in 15 years) and diversification (two new programmes established). The PLE programme advanced in two “waves”: the first centred on widening access and the second, on enhancing quality. Costs were contained. Both the presence and absence of LO attributes are identified at three different organisational levels.

Research limitations/implications

Challenges to academic identity may act to inhibit educational change, especially in research-strong settings.

Practical/implications

Business logic, and the creation and institutionalisation of educational development support – an “internal networking” group, were keys to success. “Organisational learning” in complex institutional environments such as universities involves understandably lengthy timescales (e.g. decades or more).

Practical/implications

Technology-enabled disruption in higher education appears relentless. While institutional and individual performance metrics favour research, proven cases of “how to do things differently” in education may well not get exploited, thus opening the market to alternative providers.

Originality/value

This is the only empirical example of a tailored version of distance education appropriate for research-intensive universities that we know about.

Details

The Learning Organization, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-6474

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 September 2013

Kim Ngoc Phan and Nabil Ghantous

Vietnamese banks have relied in the past on short‐term promotional techniques and attractive interest rates instead of developing strong brands. This research investigates…

Abstract

Purpose

Vietnamese banks have relied in the past on short‐term promotional techniques and attractive interest rates instead of developing strong brands. This research investigates how customers’ perceptions of bank brands drive their trust and loyalty. It also addresses how customers’ experience and their social compliance moderate the impact of their brand perceptions on their trust and loyalty.

Design/methodology/approach

Customers’ perceptions are measured through brand associations based on the bank's functional elements, its personnel and its overall image. A structural equation model linking brand associations to customers’ trust and loyalty is tested using data from a sample of 557 Vietnamese bank customers.

Findings

The results indicate that the personnel‐based brand associations are the strongest driver of trust and have a negative direct impact on loyalty, while functional and corporate‐based associations have a stronger impact on loyalty. Trust strongly mediates brand associations’ impact on loyalty. In addition, corporate‐based associations have a stronger impact on trust and loyalty for customers with little direct experience with the bank and personnel‐based associations have a stronger impact for socially compliant customers.

Practical implications

The findings indicate how different brand associations can be leveraged to trigger customers’ trust and loyalty in the Vietnamese banking sector. Moderating effects of the extent of customers’ experience imply that bank brand managers should integrate the customer relationship lifecycle in their segmentation/targeting and in their customer‐brand relationship management.

Originality/value

This study highlights the potential of branding in the Vietnamese banking industry as a strategy to build strong customer relationships. It also strongly points out the need for brand managers to take into consideration the Vietnamese context and more precisely customers’ lack of banking experience and their tendency to social compliance.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 March 2020

Michelle Carter and Chris Carter

Creative and cultural producers, like social enterprises, operate in a complex business environment where the value proposition is difficult to define, and the…

Abstract

Purpose

Creative and cultural producers, like social enterprises, operate in a complex business environment where the value proposition is difficult to define, and the organisational motivations are not always financially driven. In the case of Australian visual artists, low incomes and limited access to government funding magnify the importance of developing sustainable business models. This paper aims to present the Creative Business Model Canvas (CBMC), a reinterpretation of Osterwalder and Pigneur’s CBMC (2010), for the benefit of a visual artist’s business planning.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study uses data from semi-structured interviews to analyse and evaluate the effectiveness of the Osterwalder and Pigneur’s BMC (2010) for use by creative artists to understand the value of their artwork beyond traditional profit-driven business models. A modified canvas is presented to capture a clearer snapshot of creative arts practice with a focus on value propositions that possess dimensions of symbolic value.

Findings

This study found that the symbolic value of an artist’s practice is difficult to capture using Osterwalder and Pigneur’s CBMC (2010). An artist value proposition is composed of the artifact, artistic services and the artist’s identity. The creative CBMC, as a modified CBMC, captures aspects of the artistic identity such as professional achievements, personal life and the artist’s authenticity.

Originality/value

This study builds on Osterwalder and Pigneur’s CBMC and reimagines it for use by visual artists and art-based social enterprise organisations where the notion of value can be challenging to articulate.

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Book part
Publication date: 20 November 2020

Abstract

Details

Secrets of Working Across Five Continents: Thriving Through the Power of Cultural Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-011-2

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Abstract

Details

Secrets of Working Across Five Continents: Thriving Through the Power of Cultural Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-011-2

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Abstract

Details

Secrets of Working Across Five Continents: Thriving Through the Power of Cultural Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-011-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Chris Brewster and Frank Bournois

Considers the concept of Human Resource Management (HRM), notingparticularly its origin in the USA and critiques of the concept inEurope. Data from a major European…

Abstract

Considers the concept of Human Resource Management (HRM), noting particularly its origin in the USA and critiques of the concept in Europe. Data from a major European research project are examined. Differences between various European countries in their approach to HRM are identified and differences between HRM in Europe and the United States are suggested. It is argued that there is a need for the development of a model which relates more closely than the American literature to European HRM; and some tentative thoughts about such a model are proposed.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 20 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 September 2018

Jacob Fry, Manfred Lenzen, Damien Giurco and Stefan Pauliuk

The production of waste creates both direct and indirect environmental impacts. A range of strategies are available to reduce the generation of waste by industry and…

Abstract

The production of waste creates both direct and indirect environmental impacts. A range of strategies are available to reduce the generation of waste by industry and households, and to select waste treatment approaches that minimise environmental harm. However, evaluating these strategies requires reliable and detailed data on waste production and treatment. Unfortunately, published Australian waste data are typically highly aggregated, published by a variety of entities in different formats and do not form a complete time-series. We demonstrate a technique for constructing a multi-regional waste supply-use (MRWSU) framework for Australia using information from numerous waste data sources. This is the first subnational waste input–output framework to be constructed for Australia. We construct the framework using the Industrial Ecology Virtual Laboratory (IELab), a cloud-hosted computational platform for building Australian multiregional input–output tables. The structure of the framework complies with the System of Environmental-Economic Accounting (SEEA). We demonstrate the use of the MRWSU framework by calculating waste ‘footprints’ that enumerate the full domestic supply chain waste production for Australian consumers.

Details

Unmaking Waste in Production and Consumption: Towards the Circular Economy
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-620-4

Keywords

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Case study
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Albert Wöcke, Morris Mthombeni and Alvaro Cuervo-Cazurro

The case can be used in strategic management, international business or ethics courses. In strategic management courses, students will be able to identify political…

Abstract

Learning outcomes

The case can be used in strategic management, international business or ethics courses. In strategic management courses, students will be able to identify political relationships as sources of a firm’s competitive advantage. Students will also understand the role of ethics in the firm’s competitive advantage. In international business courses, the students will be able to analyze the role that corruption and bribery play in the analysis of a country’s institutions. Students will also understand how corruption in a host country influences a firms’ decision to internationalize. Finally, students will understand the challenges that firms face when serving customers in other countries. In ethics courses, students will understand the nature of state/business corruption, i.e. the abuse of public office for private gain and the concept of state capture, i.e. managers controlling the political system for their advantage. Students will be able to analyze the decision of whether to collaborate with unethical partners or customers.

Case overview/synopsis

Bell Pottinger Private (BPP) was a British public relations (PR) firm with a successful but questionable reputation of helping famous critical figures and despots improve their public image. In 2016, Lord Tim Bell and the other leaders of BPP were asked to create a PR campaign for the Gupta family. The Guptas were a group of businessmen headed by three brothers who migrated from India to South Africa in the early 1990s. By the 2010s, they had built a business empire allegedly thanks to a corrupt relationship with the President of South Africa, Jacob Zuma and his family. The press and prosecutors were increasing their investigations on these relations. The case has two parts, which address two separate challenges and can be taught as standalone cases or in a sequence in two sessions.

Complexity academic level

MBA and Executive Education.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only.

Subject code

CSS 5: International business.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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