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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Chris Lloyd, Philip Lee Williams, Gabrielle Vilic and Samson Tse

Initiated by the service user movement, recovery-oriented practices are one of the keystones of modern mental health care. Over the past two decades, substantial gains…

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Abstract

Purpose

Initiated by the service user movement, recovery-oriented practices are one of the keystones of modern mental health care. Over the past two decades, substantial gains have been made with introducing recovery-oriented practice in many areas of mental health practice, but there remain areas where progress is delayed, notably, the psychiatric inpatient environment. The peer support workforce can play a pivotal role in progressing recovery-oriented practices. The purpose of this paper is to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors reviewed current literature and considered practical approaches to building a peer workforce in collaboration with occupational therapists.

Findings

It is suggested that the peer support workforce should be consciously enhanced in the inpatient setting to support culture change as a matter of priority. Occupational therapists working on inpatient units should play a key role in promoting and supporting the growth in the peer support workforce. Doing so will enrich the Occupational Therapy profession as well as improving service user outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper seeks to provide a pragmatic consideration of how occupational therapists can influence mental health systems to work proactively with a peer workforce.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 45 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 9 April 2018

Hugh Worrall, Richard Schweizer, Ellen Marks, Lin Yuan, Chris Lloyd and Rob Ramjan

Support groups are a common feature of the mental health support engaged by carers and consumers. The purpose of this paper is to update and consolidate the knowledge and…

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Abstract

Purpose

Support groups are a common feature of the mental health support engaged by carers and consumers. The purpose of this paper is to update and consolidate the knowledge and the evidence for the effectiveness of mental health support groups.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on a systematic literature review of relevant databases around support groups for mental health. Support groups are defined as meetings of people with similar experiences, such as those defined as carers of a person living with a mental illness or a person living with a mental illness. These meetings aim to provide support and companionship to one another.

Findings

The results show that there is a consistent pattern of evidence, over a long period of time, which confirms the effectiveness of mental health support groups for carers and people living with mental illness. There is strong, scientifically rigorous evidence which shows the effectiveness of professionally facilitated, family-led support groups, psychoeducation carers support groups, and professionally facilitated, program-based support groups for people living with mental illness.

Research limitations/implications

This research implies the use of support groups is an important adjunct to the support of carers and people with mental illness, including severe mental illness.

Originality/value

This research brings together a range of studies indicating the usefulness of support groups as an adjunct to mental health therapy.

Details

Mental Health and Social Inclusion, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-8308

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Tawanda Machingura and Chris Lloyd

The individual placement and support (IPS) model is an evidence-based approach to employment support for people with severe mental illness that functions by co-locating an…

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Abstract

Purpose

The individual placement and support (IPS) model is an evidence-based approach to employment support for people with severe mental illness that functions by co-locating an employment consultant from the local disability employment service within a community mental health team to assist service users to find work. This paper aims to examine the unintended impacts of implementing IPS on occupational therapy practice and offer some suggestions.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed a narrative literature review on the IPS model, employment and occupational therapy. Authors then analysed and discussed impact on occupational therapy practice and concluded by making suggestions based on current evidence and practice.

Findings

The authors concluded that implementation of IPS has resulted in some unintended changes of practice in mental health with occupational therapists taking a less active role in enabling employment outcomes than previously. This paper concludes by calling upon occupational therapists to re-establish their role of enabling employment.

Originality/value

This paper offers an original viewpoint on employment and occupational therapy based on current evidence and authors’ expertise.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2019

Tawanda Machingura, Gurjeet Kaur, Chris Lloyd, Sharon Mickan, David Shum, Evelyne Rathbone and Heather Green

Previous research has provided limited evidence on whether and how demographic factors associate with sensory processing patterns (SPP) in adults. This paper aims to…

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Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has provided limited evidence on whether and how demographic factors associate with sensory processing patterns (SPP) in adults. This paper aims to examine relationships between SPPs and sociodemographic factors of age, sex, education and ethnicity in healthy adults.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional study design was used. A total of 71 adult participants was recruited from the community, using convenience sampling. Each participant completed the Adolescent/Adult Sensory Profile (AASP) and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales – short version (DASS-21). Demographic information on age, sex, education and ethnicity was collected. Results were analysed using descriptive statistics and multivariate analyses of covariance (MANCOVA).

Findings

SPPs, as measured by the AASP, were significantly correlated to demographic factors of age and education after controlling for emotional distress using the DASS-21. A statistically significant multivariate effect was found across the four dependent variables (low registration, seeking, sensitivity and avoiding) for the age category, F = 6.922, p = 0.009, ηp2 = 0.145, in the presence of a covariate DASS. The education category showed significance only in the seeking domain (p = 0.008, ηp2 = 0.10) after controlling for DASS. There was no significant correlation between SPPs and gender or ethnicity. Results also indicated that mean scores of participants in this study were “similar to most people” as standardised in the AASP.

Research limitations/implications

This was a cross-sectional study with limitations including that the study used a relatively small sample and was based on self-reported healthy participants.

Practical implications

SPPs may correlate with healthy adults’ age and to a lesser extent education. This suggests that it might be helpful to consider such demographic factors when interpreting SPPs in clinical populations, although further research in larger samples is needed to reach firmer conclusions about possible implications of demographic variables.

Originality/value

The findings in this paper add to the growing evidence that suggest that SPPs vary with sociodemographic factors.

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 1986

Marjorie Peregoy, Julia M. Rholes and Sandra L. Tucker

This is a resource guide for librarians who wish to gather books and other materials to use in promoting National Women's History Week or, as it will be soon, National…

Abstract

This is a resource guide for librarians who wish to gather books and other materials to use in promoting National Women's History Week or, as it will be soon, National Women's History Month. The emphasis is on history rather than on current women's issues. Most of the materials cited have appeared within the past ten years, but a few important older works are included as well.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 3 April 2017

Niall Turner

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Abstract

Details

Irish Journal of Occupational Therapy, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-8819

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2009

Paul Barrett

Abstract

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Maureen Fennie‐Collura

“Where HAS that book been reviewed?” This question seemed to arise daily during my work as Adult Services Consultant for an upstate New York library system. Since I was…

Abstract

“Where HAS that book been reviewed?” This question seemed to arise daily during my work as Adult Services Consultant for an upstate New York library system. Since I was responsible for the selection of new titles for the system pool collection as well as preparing buying lists for member libraries, I felt the need to have some way of “pulling together” all the reviews for new titles as they appeared in the book review media. It seemed to me that the book review indexes currently being published were inadequate in several ways, especially in the timely listing of current reviews and in the fact that you usually had to know the author's name in order to find citations to the reviews. How did I progress from perceiving a need for a more current listing of citations to book reviews and actually publishing my own index, Title Index of Current Reviews? Initially, several seemingly unrelated events led me in the direction I was eventually to take.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Abstract

Details

Death, Memorialization and Deviant Spaces
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-574-6

Article
Publication date: 15 March 2013

The purpose of this paper is to describe the support that Lloyds Banking Group is offering to employees taking maternity, paternity and adoption leave.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe the support that Lloyds Banking Group is offering to employees taking maternity, paternity and adoption leave.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper provides details of an e‐learning course developed with UK executive‐coaching company Talking Talent, which is part of a broader initiative that will see Lloyds seek to support all employees – especially working parents and their managers – through innovative training, a strong focus on flexible working and a new code of responsibility that demonstrates the bank's commitment to work‐life balance.

Findings

The paper explains that the aim of this enhanced support will be to ensure that employees have a consistently good experience and that Lloyds retains employees before, during and after transitions.

Practical implications

The paper details separate research by Talking Talent that examines some of the pinch points in women's career paths and considers how these can best be overcome.

Social implications

The paper contains useful information on helping employees taking maternity, paternity and adoption leave to make the most of the experience.

Originality/value

The paper describes Lloyds Bank's overall package of support, guidance and advice for employees during key transitions.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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