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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2002

Chris Leishman and Craig Watkins

This paper argues that the methods of constructing house price indices for UK markets lag behind those employed in Europe, Australasia and North America. This is…

Abstract

This paper argues that the methods of constructing house price indices for UK markets lag behind those employed in Europe, Australasia and North America. This is particularly evident in terms of the range and level of technical sophistication of the index construction methodologies. Importantly, the paper argues that the absence of reliable house price indicators undermines the decision‐making ability of policy makers and investors operating in urban housing markets. The paper suggests that this can, in part, be remedied by the construction of a system of local house price indices for British cities. The empirical research presents the first UK application of the repeat sales method to UK data. Indices are constructed for four cities and a range of diagnostic tests are used to establish the reliability and accuracy of the indices as a means of monitoring house price change. The research concludes by suggesting that the methods used here should be tested further on data from major metropolitan regions in England and Wales.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 20 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2004

Chris Leishman and Craig Watkins

Typically, studies of the occupiers' choice of office property have focused on the influence of location. Following the standard behavioural assumptions of neo‐classical…

Abstract

Typically, studies of the occupiers' choice of office property have focused on the influence of location. Following the standard behavioural assumptions of neo‐classical economics, the firm is assumed to make the rational profit‐maximising decision on the basis of full information. All firms are implicitly assumed to be homogeneous. This general approach eliminates much of the complexity from the decision‐making process. This paper uses evidence from a survey of over 100 office occupiers in Edinburgh to examine the influence of a broader range of factors on individual firms' choice of office. Using logistic regression techniques on the survey data, the empirical analysis shows that by taking account of heterogeneity of firms, it is possible to identify the type of property occupied. Firms' decisions are closely related to their size, business type and whether the market they serve is local, regional or national.

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Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2001

Neil Dunse, Chris Leishman and Craig Watkins

In this paper, it is argued that neo‐classical location theory is of limited value in conceptualising the structure of urban office markets. Rather there are sound…

Abstract

In this paper, it is argued that neo‐classical location theory is of limited value in conceptualising the structure of urban office markets. Rather there are sound theoretical and technical arguments for segmenting office markets into distinct submarkets. It is further argued that submarkets, rather than being based on prior knowledge of agents or researchers, should be derived empirically. As an illustration the authors use principal components analysis and cluster analysis to construct office submarkets. The results reported are based on the analysis of a unique dataset of asking rents, physical and locational characteristics of properties on the market in the cities of Glasgow and Edinburgh in the 1990s. From the empirical evidence, it is clear that different factors are important in influencing the structure of the office market in Scotland’s major urban centres.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Craig Watkins and Michael White

Abstract

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Oluwadamilola Aguda

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contributions of path-dependency and some contextual social capital drivers to housing tenure transitions in Britain…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the contributions of path-dependency and some contextual social capital drivers to housing tenure transitions in Britain. Different situations have continued to shape young adults’ housing tenure decisions. However, very little research has been done to investigate the impact of some social capital drivers, such as neighbourhood integration and strength of parental intimacy, on housing tenure decisions in Britain.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is carried out by tracking a sample of young adults in the British Household Panel Survey from 1991 to 2015 until they make tenure transition. Multinomial fixed-effects logistic regression of time to tenure transition was useful for the models, incorporating established economic and demographic drivers and with the inclusion of contextual social capital variables.

Findings

The inclusion of the number of years of parental home ownership experience tends to improve on previous path-dependency indicators of tenure transition. With additional years of parental home ownership experience, British young adults are more likely to remain or return to parental housing. Also, individuals that exchange better with their neighbours are less likely to switch tenure. On the other hand, regularity of contact with parents showed a positive relationship with home ownership or parental housing transitions.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, no study has explored the impact of the duration of socialisation in parental housing and also the impact of some other social capital drivers, such as neighbourhood integration and strength of parental intimacy, on housing tenure decisions among young adults. Hence, it is believed that the findings will further assist policymakers in understanding the dimensions and drivers of tenure shifts.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2015

Peggie Rothe, Chris Heywood, Matti Christersson and Anna-Liisa Sarasoja

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of the management of office relocations in Finnish organisations with a focus on the use of, and need for…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to increase the understanding of the management of office relocations in Finnish organisations with a focus on the use of, and need for, external advisory services.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a sequential mixed method approach. First, the use of relocation-related services, and organisations’ perception of the need for them, was assessed through a questionnaire sent to all organisations with more than 50 employees in the Helsinki Metropolitan Area (HMA). The data includes 83 responses. Subsequently, service experiences, perceived service needs, and the challenges that organisations face in relocation are studied through thematic interviews with 15 organisations that have recently relocated.

Findings

The findings show that, despite facing many challenges when relocating, many organisations do not consider using external service providers. Most organisations do not acknowledge the complexity of the process until afterwards, and they also lack knowledge of the availability of relocation-related services.

Research limitations/implications

The main limitation is the population size of the questionnaire. A larger population would have allowed for more generalisations, but the results do provide insight into the organisations’ issues in managing their relocations.

Practical implications

In order to facilitate the better organisational relocation experiences, and to develop the market for relocation-related services, service providers need to begin educating organisations of the challenges and opportunities of relocation, and successively increase the awareness of the availability of services.

Originality/value

Relocation, when it is considered in the literature, is most often construed as being about location, or site selection. This study approaches the phenomenon from the organisations’ perspective and considers relocation a process that needs to be managed.

Details

Property Management, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Tien Foo Sing, Joseph T.L. Ooi, Ah Long Wong and Patrick K.K. Lum

This paper sets out to empirically test the office space choice decision of firms currently occupying offices in Suntec City, Singapore.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to empirically test the office space choice decision of firms currently occupying offices in Suntec City, Singapore.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical data on office space determinants of occupiers in Suntec City office towers were collected via a mailed questionnaire from March to June 2004. Based on a consolidated sample list of 342 firms, 61 responses from the occupiers, which represent a response rate of 17.8 percent, were received.

Findings

Based on the survey results on office space preference of occupiers in Suntec City, the mean score statistics show that image and prestige of an office location and accessibility by public transport are the two most highly ranked factors by the firms.

Research limitations/implications

The selection of Suntec City as a sample case study may help to control the heterogeneity of building factor, but it will also limit the generalization of the findings. However, the results provide support to the deliberate strategies by the management to create a pro‐business environment and also to connect the space through deliberate network effects. The second limitation is the uneven distribution of sample firms by size in the survey.

Originality/value

In many office space choice studies, building and accessibility factors were invariably found to be significant determinants of office location. In this study, non‐location and network connectivity factors were included in the empirical tests, and they were found to be significant in influencing office space decision of selected clusters of firms in a building.

Details

Journal of Property Investment & Finance, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-578X

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Donna Leishman

This paper is an attempt at uncovering some online practices that it is proposed utilise the age‐old lineages of the visual comic and cartoon, which can help one better…

Abstract

This paper is an attempt at uncovering some online practices that it is proposed utilise the age‐old lineages of the visual comic and cartoon, which can help one better understand how to create and learn through interaction enabling technologies such as those available today. As a secondary theme the paper looks at the potential for new media practices (using the label to cover a range of disciplines from design to fine arts in the digital realm) to encourage a different type of educational dialogue between student and tutor, a dialogue which could be useful in developing student confidence and thus re‐engage them in academic enquiry.

Details

On the Horizon, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1074-8121

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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2019

Cencheng Zhao, Eunhwa Yang, Yiqian Nie and Justin D. Russo

This paper aims to provide organizations with a new tool to make decisions related to a facility (building) selection process. Traditionally, value engineering (VE…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide organizations with a new tool to make decisions related to a facility (building) selection process. Traditionally, value engineering (VE) applies the Value = Function/Cost formula to evaluate the worth of a product. In this paper, the VE-based facility-selection approach is proposed, where the cost of a facility is expressed in net present value (NPV) as it contains the net expense of purchasing or leasing a building as well as the time value of money. Also, a method of quantifying functions and involved risks of different facility choices is proposed.

Design/methodology/approach

The framework of the VE-based facility-selection process is broken down into three steps: preparation, calculation/analysis and assessment. In the latter part of this paper, the authors share a sample analysis by illustrating the analysis and decision-making process when three hypothetical facility-selection options are available.

Findings

The sample analysis indicates that companies can get the lowest cost and risk while improving their functions to achieve the highest value by using the modified VE formula to drive an optimal option for company’s business expansion and facility-selection process.

Originality/value

This paper provides organizations with a strategic system and process to select proper facilities or buildings for business expansion. The VE approach suggested in this study can allow facility/real estate portfolio decision-makers to analyze financial and functional aspects of the facility at the same time and obtain the value coefficient when they choose a new facility from different options. Finally, they can select the best option, which has the highest value coefficient, given financial and functional considerations.

Details

Journal of Corporate Real Estate , vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-001X

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Article
Publication date: 11 June 2018

Colin Rogers

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how practical research can be undertaken into sensitive issues within the criminal justice system having cognisance of the needs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to illustrate how practical research can be undertaken into sensitive issues within the criminal justice system having cognisance of the needs of those subject to the research process.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed methods design which was complicated due to the subject matter being explored, that of historical reporting of sexual offences. Confidential questionnaires and focus group method utilised, but in constant contact with specialised victim support service to ensure rights of victims understood and interwoven into the design.

Findings

Even though there are some very sensitive areas within the criminal justice system where it is believed research is difficult to undertake, it can be achieved by constant reference to the needs of the victim and strict confidentiality. Given the right circumstances and approach, research into what has been previously considered areas of difficulty can be researched effectively.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the research methods explored an utilised, a template for research methodology can be seen which can be transferred into any other sensitive topic that requires research. In addition, by undertaking this method, previously unheard voices of victims of historical crimes can be utilised to inform official policy and practice. However, a limitation of the approach can be the low number of respondents wishing to take part.

Practical implications

Victims have an opportunity to influence public policy. The methods utilised “opens up” the possibility for replication of research into other sensitive areas of the CJS. The methods utilised involved a number of Criminal Justice Agencies which assisted in maximising their understanding of victims experiences thorough the partnership approach. The research methods and results influencing training methods of the police as first responders to such incidents.

Social implications

The social implications of this paper are that it will encourage other researchers not to be afraid of what appears to be “hard to reach” and sensitive topics in terms of social science research. This will allow for greater numbers of marginalised individuals and victims to engage and influence the criminal justice system, thereby influencing public policy and improving the way victims of crime are treated.

Originality/value

This paper is one of the few, if any, that explores ethical problems and sensitive topics such as historical reporting of sexual offences. It will have resonance for those who wish to undertake similar types of research.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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