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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Chris LeBeau

122

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 18 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2006

Chris LeBeau

794

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Chris LeBeau

55

Abstract

Details

Reference Reviews, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2013

Mary A. Hollerich

The aim of this paper is to report on conference programs, panel discussions, initiatives, and developments of interest to the resource sharing community.

369

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report on conference programs, panel discussions, initiatives, and developments of interest to the resource sharing community.

Design/methodology/approach

The report summarizes conference events.

Findings

The author reports on relevant sessions held at the specified conference, supplemented by presentations, handouts, meeting minutes, and videos posted online after the conference.

Originality/value

The report summarizes conference events addressing all forms and aspects of resource sharing and related subjects such as copyright, licensing, electronic resources, library consortia, and assessment. Issues covered are of interest to resource sharing managers and front line staff around the globe.

Details

Interlending & Document Supply, vol. 41 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-1615

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Emmanuel Lazega and Lise Mounier

This study stresses the importance of considering a “joint” governance of interfirm relations as an alternative to external governance (by the State) and self-governance…

Abstract

This study stresses the importance of considering a “joint” governance of interfirm relations as an alternative to external governance (by the State) and self-governance (by the business community) of these relations. We argue that a broadly-conceived structural and organizational approach to economic institutions provides insights into this joint governance because it shows how such a system spreads the costs of control among several kinds of stakeholders. We look at how transactions between any two firms are regulated through jurisdiction by “consular” judges (i.e. judges elected through the local Chamber of Commerce) who indirectly represent other firms and industries in that market, and are therefore considered to be at the same time third parties and potential levers of influence acting on behalf of corporate interests. We study an empirical case of such joint governance: The Tribunal of Commerce of Paris (TCP). Following previous work on lateral control and leverage, we hypothesize that industries and/or companies that have a strong stake in the conflict resolution process will be more represented among the judges of this court than other industries and/or companies, and that judges who are socially active in the court that enforces this joint governance will be sought out for advice more than other judges, and thus gain influence on their peers by suggesting specific outcomes. The analyses of the composition of the bench and of the advice network data collected in this court display an influence structure that confirms these hypotheses and that is likely to affect conflict resolution between businesses. It thus characterizes joint governance of markets as a complex set of social processes worthy of economic sociologists’ attention.

Details

The Governance of Relations in Markets and Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-202-3

Article
Publication date: 7 February 2014

Matthew Egan

Drought conditions affected an acute water scarcity crisis across large parts of Australia through the late 1990s and into the 2000s. Public policy responses emphasised…

2105

Abstract

Purpose

Drought conditions affected an acute water scarcity crisis across large parts of Australia through the late 1990s and into the 2000s. Public policy responses emphasised demand management strategies. This study aims to examine the response to these challenges within a large Australian university from 1999 to 2010.

Design/methodology/approach

Case study utilising semi-structured interviews.

Findings

Staff empowered to take an emergent approach to issues of social concern, initiated water accountability change focused on water efficiency from 1999, and “water principles” from 2002. A growing network had some success translating and enrolling others over coming years. However into the late 2000s, as drought conditions abated and with a renewed focus on financial control, developments that had not established clear links to core accountability mechanisms eroded. This study demonstrates that measurement is essential to understanding patterns of water usage, but also needs to establish links to core systems of accountability to broadly change behaviour.

Practical implications

Higher education continues to be an environment where creative responses to community challenges can be nurtured. Despite increasing pressures to focus on financial outcomes, the sector should continue to nurture opportunities to shape issues of community concern through leading practice.

Originality/value

This study provides insight into the development, fragility, and contested meaning of emergent systems of water accountability within the context of a university.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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