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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1993

Phillip Marshall and Chris Kennedy

Investigates the methods and techniques by which developmentcompanies and their advisers value land and projects for development andredevelopment. Comments on the effect…

Abstract

Investigates the methods and techniques by which development companies and their advisers value land and projects for development and redevelopment. Comments on the effect of the methodology on residential and commercial land prices in the property market. Concludes that the fault with appraisal techniques lies more with the input of inaccurate information and lack of objectivity rather than the actual technique used.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Pete Starkey

Abstract

Details

Circuit World, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0305-6120

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Lorraine Sugar, Chris Kennedy and Dan Hoornweg

The purpose of this paper is to understand how cities at different stages of development each subject to its own challenges in adapting to climate change can manage…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how cities at different stages of development each subject to its own challenges in adapting to climate change can manage greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies are undertaken for three cities: Amman, Jakarta and Dar es Salaam, including determination of GHG emissions and analysis of climate change data (where available) for each.

Findings

In Amman, the most climate‐sensitive municipal service is water; Jordan is exceptionally dry, and nearly 15 per cent of all electricity consumption is by the water authority. Jakarta has already experienced extreme flooding. The climate vulnerabilities associated with sea‐level rise are intensified by subsidence in parts of Jakarta. Alternating floods and droughts are climate impacts already experienced in Dar es Salaam. Droughts have impacted Tanzania's electricity infrastructure disrupting hydroelectricity production, requiring new natural gas infrastructure to maintain power, thereby increasing GHG emissions. Nonetheless, Dar es Salaam's GHG emissions at 0.56 t CO2e/cap are small compared to Amman and Jakarta at 3.66 and 4.92 t CO2e/cap., respectively.

Originality/value

Synergist development strategies, addressing climate change mitigation and adaptation are suggested. In Amman an increased share of photovoltaic electricity production might be used for service provision, especially for energy needs surrounding water supply. Advanced slum upgrading in Jakarta could see relocation of the at‐risk poor to safe areas with energy efficient homes connected to public transit and decentralized, community‐based electricity generation. The focus in Dar es Salaam community‐based waste‐to‐energy facilities would reduce climate change impacts and vulnerabilities while addressing energy poverty in poor communities.

Details

International Journal of Climate Change Strategies and Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-8692

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Article
Publication date: 6 July 2015

Tim Lang

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that there are correlations between campus sustainability initiatives and environmental performance, as measured by…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the hypothesis that there are correlations between campus sustainability initiatives and environmental performance, as measured by resource consumption and waste generation performance metrics. Institutions of higher education would like to imply that their campus sustainability initiatives are good proxies for their environmental performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Using data reported through the Association for the Advancement in Higher Education’s Sustainability Tracking and Rating System (AASHE STARS) framework, a series of univariate multiple linear regression models were constructed to test for correlations between energy, greenhouse gas (GHG), water and waste performance metrics, and credit points awarded to institutions for various campus sustainability initiatives.

Findings

There are very limited correlations between institutional environmental performance and adoption of campus sustainability initiatives, be they targeted operational or coordination and planning best practices, or curricular, co-curricular or research activities. Conversely, there are strong correlations between environmental performance and campus characteristics, namely, institution type and climate zone.

Practical implications

Institutional decision makers should not assume that implementing best practices given credit by AASHE STARS will lead to improved environmental performance. Those assessing institutional sustainability should be wary of institutions who cite initiatives to imply a certain level of environmental performance or performance improvement.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to use data reported through the AASHE STARS framework to assess correlations between campus initiatives and environmental performance. It extends beyond previous research by considering energy, water and waste performance metrics in addition to GHG emissions, and it considers campus sustainability initiatives in addition to campus characteristics.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Book part
Publication date: 29 August 2018

Wenqing Li and James F. Nieberding

In regressions using a semi-logarithmic functional form that include a dummy variable, Kennedy (1981) showed that instead of interpreting the dummy coefficient directly…

Abstract

In regressions using a semi-logarithmic functional form that include a dummy variable, Kennedy (1981) showed that instead of interpreting the dummy coefficient directly, one needs to “correct” it to estimate the percentage effect of the dummy variable on the dependent variable. In the context of an antitrust application, we show that when using a dummy variable to estimate the overcharge as a percentage of the actual price, one should not apply the correction proposed by Kennedy because doing so will lead to an overcharge estimate with a larger bias.

Details

Healthcare Antitrust, Settlements, and the Federal Trade Commission
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-599-9

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2020

Benjamin Piers William Ellway and Alison Dean

This paper uses practice theory to strengthen the theoretical relationship between customer engagement (CE) and value cocreation (VCC), thereby demonstrating how customers…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper uses practice theory to strengthen the theoretical relationship between customer engagement (CE) and value cocreation (VCC), thereby demonstrating how customers may become engaged and remain engaged through VCC practices.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a problematization approach to identify shared assumptions evident in service-dominant logic (SDL) and CE research. Practice theory, as a higher-order perspective, is used to integrate the iterative and cyclical processes of VCC and CE, specifically through the theoretical mechanism of habitus.

Findings

Habitus acts as a customer value lens and provides a bridging concept to demonstrate how VCC and CE are joined via sensemaking processes. These processes determine how customers perceive, assess, and evaluate value, how they become engaged through VCC, and how their experience of engagement may lead to further VCC practice. The temporally bound experiences, states, and episodes are accumulated and aggregated through an enduring customer value lens comprised of habituated dispositions, interests, and attitudes.

Research limitations/implications

This work responds to calls for research to strengthen the theoretical link between VCC and CE and to take account of customers' lived realities and their contextualized experiences. A key suggestion for future research is the use of a rope metaphor to stimulate thinking about the complex, temporally unfolding, and interrelated processes of VCC and CE.

Practical implications

The customer value lens and CE rope are introduced to simplify the complex, abstract, theoretical research on VCC and CE for a nonacademic audience. To understand how customers' value lenses are formed and change, and how a CE rope is strengthened, firms, service designers, and practitioners need to understand sensemaking processes through customer narratives and to use platforms and feedback to support and trigger sensemaking.

Originality/value

This paper provides a theoretical mechanism to explain the iterative and cyclical nature of VCC and CE processes and how accumulation and aggregation occur in these processes. In doing so, it demonstrates that CE occurs by virtue of, and is typified by, sensemaking processes that reproduce and shape a customer's habituated value lens, which perceives, assesses, and determines VCC and thus provides a basis for further customer engagement.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1996

Graham Robinson and Chris Hurley

Describes a process of management learning and development involving over 100 senior public sector managers in the States of Guernsey and covering a period of six years…

Abstract

Describes a process of management learning and development involving over 100 senior public sector managers in the States of Guernsey and covering a period of six years. Details the programme’s content and action learning approach which had much in common with many other management development processes. However, highlights the fact that it involved the whole spectrum of public sector activity (from policy making, service purchasing and service providing to utilities trading) and that more than 20 chief executives and their senior management teams participated in the process, which makes it somewhat unusual. Reports that, in the wake of the programme, a fundamental shift in the “doing of management” would appear to have taken place, involving a willingness to share resources, to break out of silos and to experiment across previously well‐defended boundaries; and notes that it has also generated a healthy appetite for further learning.

Details

Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Ian Phau, Vanessa Quintal, Chris Marchegiani and Sean Lee

This paper aims to examine how nostalgia influences travel attitudes and intentions of tourist destination among travellers with Italian heritage. Perceived travel risks…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how nostalgia influences travel attitudes and intentions of tourist destination among travellers with Italian heritage. Perceived travel risks as a moderating role between the relationships between personal and historical nostalgia and travel attitudes are also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered mail survey was used, targeting Australians of Italian heritage, to investigate the influence of nostalgia on attitudes and intentions to visit Italy as a tourist destination. A total of 218 usable responses were used for analysis. Exploratory factor analysis was utilised to assess the dimensionality of the constructs, and regression analysis was used to test the hypothesised relationships in the research model.

Findings

On analysis of the data collected through a mail survey, results showed that only personal nostalgia was found to exert a positive influence upon travel attitudes which in turn was positively related to travel intention toward Italy. Perceived travel risk factors did not moderate the relationship between personal nostalgia and travel attitudes. However, a negative relationship was found between perceived travel risk and travel intentions towards Italy.

Practical implications

The findings provide further validity to the personal and historical nostalgia scales as a means of understanding motivations to visit a tourist destination. Such findings are significant in adding destination managers and policymakers in developing marketing executions and policies that seek to capitalise on the nostalgic sentiments of the target segments. This study further contributes to the literature on perceived travel risks by highlighting its moderating effect on nostalgic motivations and travel attitudes.

Originality/value

This study aimed to enrich the theoretical base of the tourism discipline by reviewing the significance of personal and historical nostalgia as travel motives and their impact upon a tourist’s travel attitudes and intentions. It also examines the moderating role of perceived travel risks in an empirical model. Further, the current study is the first of its kind to empirically examine personal and historical nostalgia within a leisure travel context.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Article
Publication date: 31 March 2020

Haw-Yi Liang, Chih-Ying Chu and Jiun-Sheng Chris Lin

Keeping both employees and customers highly engaged has become a critical issue for service firms, especially for high-contact and highly customized services. Therefore…

Abstract

Purpose

Keeping both employees and customers highly engaged has become a critical issue for service firms, especially for high-contact and highly customized services. Therefore, it is essential to engage employees and customers during service interactions for better service outcomes. However, past research on employee and customer engagement has primarily focused on brands and organizations. Little research has concentrated on service interactions as the objects of engagement. To fill this research gap, this study aims to clarify and define service engagement behaviors (SEBs), identify various employee and customer SEBs and develop a model to investigate the relationships between these behaviors.

Design/methodology/approach

A theoretical framework was developed based on social contagion theory and service-dominant (S-D) logic to explore the effects of employee SEBs on customer SEBs through customer perceptions of relational energy and interaction cohesion. Dyadic survey data collected from 293 customer-employee pairs in various high-contact and highly customized service industries were examined through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Results show that employee SEBs (service role involvement, customer orientation behavior and customer empowerment behavior) positively influence relational energy and interaction cohesion, which in turn affect customer SEBs (service exploration behavior and service coordination behavior).

Originality/value

This study represents pioneering research to conceptualize SEBs. Different from the extant literature on engagement, SEBs capture the proactive and collaborative engagement behaviors of employees and customers in service interactions. Various employee and customer SEBs were identified and an empirical model was proposed and tested to investigate the effect of employee SEBs on customer SEBs through relational energy and interaction cohesion.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 31 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2008

Lloyd C. Harris and Chris Ezeh

This paper seeks better to conceptualise, operationalise and subsequently to test a multi‐dimensional and more social view of servicescape and the direct and moderated…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks better to conceptualise, operationalise and subsequently to test a multi‐dimensional and more social view of servicescape and the direct and moderated linkages with loyalty intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey research method was used to study servicescapes in the context of UK restaurants.

Findings

In furtherance of conceptualisation efforts, a model is developed to evaluate the linear influences of nine servicescape variables on customers' loyalty intentions. Additionally, the model appraises the impact of personal and environmental factors which moderate the servicescape‐loyalty intentions relationship. Analysis of survey responses finds a number of significant associations with loyalty intentions.

Practical implications

The results of the study indicate that practitioners should reflect carefully on a range of servicescape variables and judiciously manage such factors to improve the extent to which consumers are likely to foster positive intentions to be loyal.

Originality/value

The paper contributes a multi‐dimensional and more social framework of servicescape that is subsequently operationalised and tested. It also supplies a measure of servicescape that future researchers may find useful.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 42 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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