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Article
Publication date: 5 October 2015

Chris Johnstone, Rachel Harwood, Andrew Gilliam and Andrew Mitchell

Early access to senior decision makers and investigations has improved outcomes for many conditions. A surgical clinical decisions unit (CDU) was created to allow rapid…

Abstract

Purpose

Early access to senior decision makers and investigations has improved outcomes for many conditions. A surgical clinical decisions unit (CDU) was created to allow rapid assessment and investigation by on-call senior surgical team members to facilitate decision making and, if appropriate, discharge within a set time frame (less than four hours). The purpose of this paper is to compare outcomes for unscheduled general surgery admissions to the hospital before and after commissioning this unit.

Design/methodology/approach

Prospectively collected hospital episode statistics data were compared for all general surgical admissions for one year prior to (July 2010-June 2011) and two years after (July 2011-June 2013) the introduction of the CDU. Statistical analysis using the Mann Whitney U-test was performed.

Findings

More patients were discharged within 24 hours (12 per cent vs 20 per cent, p < 0.001) and total hospital stay decreased (4.6 days vs 3.2 days, p < 0.001) following introduction of CDU. Admission via A & E (273 vs 212, p < 0.01) was also decreased. Overall there was a 25.3 per cent reduction in emergency surgical admissions. No difference was noted in 30-day readmission rates (47 vs 49, p=0.29).

Originality/value

The introduction of a CDU in has increased early discharge rates and facilitated safe early discharge, reducing overall hospital stay for unscheduled general surgical admissions. This has decreased fixed bed costs and improved patient flow by decreasing surgical care episodes routed through the emergency department (ED). In all, 30-day readmission rates have not been influenced by shorter hospital stay. Service redesign involving early senior decision making and patient investigation increases efficiency and patient satisfaction within unscheduled general surgical care. Not original but significant in that the model has not been widely implemented and this is a useful addition to the literature.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1991

Jill Earnshaw and Cary L. Cooper

Discusses the development of employer liability from its origins inliability for work‐connected physical injury, through liability forwork‐related physical injury/illness…

Abstract

Discusses the development of employer liability from its origins in liability for work‐connected physical injury, through liability for work‐related physical injury/illness, mental/nervous disorders as a result of physical injury/illness, to present day liability for stress‐induced illness. The problems of cases of this nature are examined, and it is suggested that employers take reasonable steps to minimise those stresses of the workplace that are foreseeable.

Details

Employee Councelling Today, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-8217

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1995

Ian Campbell

Discusses work‐related stress, focusing on its management,counselling and training. Warns that recent successful compensationclaims by employees over work‐related stress…

Abstract

Discusses work‐related stress, focusing on its management, counselling and training. Warns that recent successful compensation claims by employees over work‐related stress are indicative of the needs for companies to introduce programmes to combat stress. Gives examples of companies which have introduced employee assistance programmes and discusses their success. Suggests that such programmes not only help to avoid litigation but also help to combat productivity reduction due to stress in the workplace or at home.

Details

Management Development Review, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0962-2519

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1986

To speak of education and old age in the same breath sounds paradoxical, even slightly absurd. Education has always been for the young, and it seems odd to suggest that…

Abstract

To speak of education and old age in the same breath sounds paradoxical, even slightly absurd. Education has always been for the young, and it seems odd to suggest that the old should continue to be educated; for, as the saying goes, you cannot teach an old dog new tricks. Well there may be some truth in that, although it depends on which old dog you mean.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 28 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Lynne Millward and Sarah Senker

The purpose of this paper is to consider how male young offenders on community orders made sense of their offending behaviour as well as considering the extent these views…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how male young offenders on community orders made sense of their offending behaviour as well as considering the extent these views aligned with traditional stereotypes of masculinity.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a qualitative approach, using semi‐structured in‐depth interviews followed by interpretative phenomenological analysis to identify themes within the participant's narratives.

Findings

Two master themes were identified; “dissociating from an offender identity and authoring a new non‐offender identity” as well as “masculinity as multifaceted”. These themes were interpreted using self‐determination theory, highlighting the importance of intrinsic motivation and specific environmental conditions in enabling change and exploration of new identities.

Research limitations/implications

This work was based on a small sample size. Whilst this permitted an in‐depth analysis it is acknowledged that this may have implications for making generalisations across the youth offending population.

Practical implications

This study identifies that the principles of autonomy, relatedness and competence, as outlined in self‐determination theory, potentially offer fruitful areas to be implemented in community orders. Such conditions can help to harness intrinsic motivation to change and self‐regulated behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to those working and holding an interest within the criminal justice domain. Its adoption of a qualitative approach, considering a UK sample of young offenders on community orders at the time of the interview is unique. This study allows practical recommendations to be made to those engaged in youth rehabilitation.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article
Publication date: 14 September 2012

Claira Newton and Chris Bale

Previous research into health care professionals' perceptions of self‐harm has found that, although complex, in some cases their perceptions can be somewhat negative and…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research into health care professionals' perceptions of self‐harm has found that, although complex, in some cases their perceptions can be somewhat negative and unsympathetic towards individuals who harm themselves. However, it is presently unclear whether these perceptions reflect more general attitudes to self‐harm in broader social groups. The present study aims to represent a preliminary investigation into perceptions of self‐harm in the general public. First, since there is no universal agreement on which behaviours constitute self‐harm, this study aims to investigate public perceptions of this, including whether participants identified more controversial behaviours such as eating disorders and body modification as methods of self‐harm in addition to the more commonly identified behaviours such as cutting and burning. Secondly, it aims to identify whether attitudes towards individuals who self‐harm in a small sample of the general public were similar to the sometimes negative and unsympathetic perceptions of health care professionals demonstrated in some previous studies.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with seven participants, none of whom had any professional or academic experience or knowledge of self‐harm, who were recruited via second acquaintances of the first author. A matrix‐based thematic analysis method was used to analyse the data collected.

Findings

The main findings of this study were that eating disorders were generally perceived as forms of self‐harm while body modification was not, and that participants generally showed sympathy towards individuals who self‐harm, especially when they perceived the behaviour to be associated with mental illness.

Originality/value

Although, given the small size of the sample, this should be considered a preliminary study, the findings suggest that developing a greater understanding of public perceptions of self‐harm could have important implications for understanding mental health professionals' perceptions of the phenomenon. The authors suggest that stigma and negative perceptions of people who self‐harm may not be inevitable and that further research in this area could be of value in informing public and professional education campaigns in this area.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2021

Andrew R. Timming, Chris Baumann and Paul Gollan

The paper aims to examine the effect of employees' perceived physical attractiveness on the extent to which their voices are “listened to” by management.

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to examine the effect of employees' perceived physical attractiveness on the extent to which their voices are “listened to” by management.

Design/methodology/approach

Using an experimental research design, the paper estimates main effects of employee attractiveness and possible moderating effects of employee race and gender as well as the gender of their “managers.”

Findings

The results suggest that, with few exceptions, more physically attractive employees are significantly more likely to have their suggestions acted upon by managers than less attractive employees, pointing to a powerful form of workplace discrimination. This finding holds across races, with more attractive white, black, and Asian employees exerting a more impactful voice than their less attractive counterparts, although the moderation appears to be stronger for whites than ethnic minorities.

Research limitations/implications

The results have important implications for the extant literatures on employee voice, diversity and discrimination.

Originality/value

This is among the first studies to demonstrate that less attractive employees suffer from an “employee voice deficit” vis-à-vis their more attractive counterparts.

Details

Journal of Participation and Employee Ownership, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-7641

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

He has been with the company, as personnel manager, since 1982. The new position of manager — customer services, will encompass spares and service, installation and…

Abstract

He has been with the company, as personnel manager, since 1982. The new position of manager — customer services, will encompass spares and service, installation and commissioning, rebuild and refurbishing and customer training.

Details

Pigment & Resin Technology, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0369-9420

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Book part
Publication date: 28 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Advances in Accounting Behavioral Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-961-6

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