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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2008

Chris Holmwood, Michelle Marriott and Rachel Humeniuk

Objective. To report on the patterns of substance use in newly admitted male and female South Australian prisoners using the WHO‐ASSIST screening tool (Alcohol, Smoking…

Abstract

Objective. To report on the patterns of substance use in newly admitted male and female South Australian prisoners using the WHO‐ASSIST screening tool (Alcohol, Smoking and Substance Involvement Screening Test) and observe the feasibility of using the ASSIST and associated Brief Intervention in this population. Data sources. Results of the first 518 prisoners screened using ASSIST in South Australian reception prisons. Results. In the first 10 months of the implementation of the WHO ASSIST, 518 clients were assessed in the 3 metropolitan intake prisons in Adelaide, Australia. This represents 31% of all male and 35% of all female prisoners admitted over this period. Injecting drug use was reported in the previous 3 months by 55% of men and 51% of women. The six most common substances used at high and moderate risk levels, in order of prevalence (from high to low) in males were tobacco, cannabis, amphetamines, opiates, alcohol, and sedatives. In women the order was tobacco, amphetamines, cannabis, opiates and sedatives equal, and alcohol. Fifty percent of men and 33% of women were using four or more substances. Overall rates of substance use related risk amongst men coming into prison are slightly greater than for women. Accessing prisoners for screening within the first few days is difficult with 55% already being released or at court or other external appointments.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2008

Raelene M. Leach, Teresa Burgess and Chris Holmwood

Traumatic grief arises as a result of interpersonal trauma experienced as a betrayal of attachment. The distinct set of symptoms associated with it were first recognized…

Abstract

Traumatic grief arises as a result of interpersonal trauma experienced as a betrayal of attachment. The distinct set of symptoms associated with it were first recognized in the 1990s. Losses associated with traumatic grief can be either death or non‐death related. A variety of studies have demonstrated that many prisoners have suffered from losses and trauma throughout their lives, and in many instances they have never received any support or interventions to address resultant problems. This paper examines whether there could be a relationship between many of the maladaptive behaviours demonstrated by the prisoners (including substance use), mental illness and traumatic grief. Of particular importance is the exploration of whether the high rates of recidivism seen in many developed countries (and which in Australia have been reported as high as 77%) may be related to traumatic grief. This paper explores new concepts that may be relevant to the development of strategies to reduce recidivism.

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International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Amanda French

This chapter critically examines how recent government papers and policies have informed and contextualised the new Higher Education and Research Bill (HERB) passed in…

Abstract

This chapter critically examines how recent government papers and policies have informed and contextualised the new Higher Education and Research Bill (HERB) passed in April 2017. In particular, it concerns itself with the issue of ‘teaching excellence’, through what has been termed the Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) that has emerged as a key plank of the current government’s policy for future funding of higher education (HE). It will consider the other spurs for reform in HERB, such as the desire to create a culture in HE where teaching has equal status with research, the need to ensure that universities provide better information about their courses and the experiences that they can offer students and the predictable governmental requirement for institutions to give value for money and to be clearly held accountable for any failure to provide a quality service to students. Lastly, there is also a strong emphasis on widening student participation across the sector and ‘levelling the playing field’ so that new providers can set up with the minimum of red tape. It is interesting to note how each of these additional areas for reform is clearly linked to TEF, which, this chapter will argue, will be the key vehicle used to drive them forward.

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Teaching Excellence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-761-4

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Book part
Publication date: 21 December 2017

Matt O’Leary

This chapter starts by interrogating the notion of teaching excellence. It then moves on to discussing some of the data sources currently used in Higher Education…

Abstract

This chapter starts by interrogating the notion of teaching excellence. It then moves on to discussing some of the data sources currently used in Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) to monitor and measure the quality of teaching. What do these sources actually reveal about teaching excellence and how might we make better use of them? From large-scale national censuses like the National Student Survey (NSS) to institutional data sets such as teaching observations, the contribution that each source makes to our understanding of the quality of HE teaching is underexplored and contested. It is argued that there is a need for more transparent debate across HEIs and the sector as a whole about the benefits and limitations of such data as well as greater acknowledgement of the role of collaboration over competition. The chapter concludes that teaching excellence is a marketised misconception of the complex reality of the reciprocal relationship between teaching and learning. Contrary to policy rhetoric and far from encouraging an environment of collegial improvement, it introduces an unhelpful ethos of contrived competition into what is essentially an interdependent relationship underpinned by collective collaboration. It is by focusing attention on the latter where the real gains and insights are likely to be made.

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Teaching Excellence in Higher Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-761-4

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Stephen Todd

Abstract

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Structural Survey, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-080X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1977

Beth Macleod and David Ginsburg

Although none of the new music reference books of the past year totally replaces the old stand‐bys, some significant works did appear, especially in the areas of…

Abstract

Although none of the new music reference books of the past year totally replaces the old stand‐bys, some significant works did appear, especially in the areas of contemporary music, opera, and classical music discography.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1934

LIBRARIES have come impressively into the public picture in the past year or two, and seldom with more effect than when Their Majesties the King and Queen opened the new…

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LIBRARIES have come impressively into the public picture in the past year or two, and seldom with more effect than when Their Majesties the King and Queen opened the new Central Reference Library at Manchester on July 17th. In a time, which is nearly the end of a great depression, that the city which probably felt the depression more than any in the Kingdom should have proceeded with the building of a vast store‐house of learning is a fact of great social significance and a happy augury for libraries as a whole. His Majesty the King has been most felicitous in providing what we may call “slogans” for libraries. It will be remembered that in connection with the opening of the National Central Library, he suggested that it was a “University which all may join and which none need ever leave” —words which should be written in imperishable letters upon that library and be printed upon its stationery for ever. As Mr. J. D. Stewart said at the annual meeting of the National Central Library, it was a slogan which every public library would like to appropriate. At Manchester, His Majesty gave us another. He said: “To our urban population open libraries are as essential to health of mind, as open spaces to health of body.” This will be at the disposal of all of us for use. It is a wonderful thing that Manchester in these times has been able to provide a building costing £450,000 embodying all that is modern and all that is attractive in the design of libraries. The architect, Mr. Vincent Harris, and the successive librarians, Mr. Jast and Mr. Nowell, are to be congratulated upon the crown of their work.

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New Library World, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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