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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2004

Leslie T. Szamosi, Linda Duxbury and Chris Higgins

The focus of this paper is on developing an understanding, and benchmarking, human resource management (HRM) issues in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in South‐Eastern…

Abstract

The focus of this paper is on developing an understanding, and benchmarking, human resource management (HRM) issues in small and medium enterprises (SMEs) in South‐Eastern Europe. The importance of SME's in helping transition‐based economies develop is critical, but at the same time the research indicates that the movement toward westernized business systems has a dramatic impact on the human resources within such businesses. Toward addressing this linkage, critical HRM issues related to work outcomes, measures of satisfaction, and managerial support were studied with a sample of nearly 300 employees from 21 SMEs in a country in South‐Eastern Europe (the Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia). The data suggest that SMEs are not currently giving their employees what they want from their job (e.g. career development, participation in decision making) and that women are treated differently than men creating an imbalance within the workforce. From these data recommendations are drawn for SMEs on how to move forward as transition unfolds.

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Education + Training, vol. 46 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Abstract

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Research on Professional Responsibility and Ethics in Accounting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-239-9

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2009

Abstract

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Journal of Children's Services, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Linda Duxbury and Michael Halinski

The aging of the workforce and the impending labour force shortage at the skilled end of the labour market increases the need for organizations to understand how to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aging of the workforce and the impending labour force shortage at the skilled end of the labour market increases the need for organizations to understand how to “re-engage” older workers with low commitment and reduce the turnover intentions of committed older knowledge workers. The current study addresses this issue by using employee commitment and intent to turnover scores to classify older knowledge workers into four groups: Disengaged-Exiters, Engaged-High-Performers, Retired-on-the-Job and Exiting-Performers. The purpose of this paper is to identify a set of work factors and practices that predispose older knowledge workers to fall into one or another of the four groups and offer suggestions on how organizations can increase commitment and decrease intent to turnover of their older workers.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper used survey data (n=5,588) from a Canadian national study on work, family and caregiving to test the framework. Data analysis was performed using a MANCOVA with one independent variable (Boomer group), four dependent variables (job satisfaction, non-supportive culture, supportive manager, work-role overload) and one covariate (gender).

Findings

The results support the framework. The findings suggest organizations that wish to retain committed Baby Boomers need to address issues with respect to workload. Alternatively, organizations who wish to increase the commitment levels of Boomers who have “Retired-on-the-Job” need to focus on supportive management, organizational culture and career development.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the literature on organizational commitment and intent to turnover by re-conceptualizing the relationship between these traditional concepts.

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Journal of Organizational Change Management, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0953-4814

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2020

Chris Hattingh and Juan-Pierré Bruwer

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the factors that led to Cape Town’s gay village to transform from a “gaytrified” tourism mecca to a “heterosexualised” urban…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the factors that led to Cape Town’s gay village to transform from a “gaytrified” tourism mecca to a “heterosexualised” urban space, from a gay leisure space owner perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

Empirical observations of the six remaining gay leisure space owners in De Waterkant (population) are taken into account by using semi-structured interviews. All narratives are analysed in Altas.ti – qualitative data analysis software – to identify applicable factors, which participants believe are contributing to the “de-gaying” of Cape Town’s gay village.

Findings

From the conducted analyses, it becomes apparent that Western theorisation of the “de-gaying” of gay villages is not universally applicable as certain factors contributing to De Waterkant’s demise appear to be location-specific, suggesting that Western theory is insufficient to explain gay spatial realities in non-Western contexts such as South Africa. The identified factors responsible for the “de-gaying” of De Waterkant adversely affect Cape Town’s status as a gay capital and its ability to market this gay neighbourhood to attract the gay tourism market. This may result in lost socio-economic opportunities considering the financial contribution of gay travellers to the local tourist economy.

Originality/value

This study is the first of its kind to use first-hand narratives of the six remaining gay business owners in De Waterkant and marks the first attempt to investigate the factors, from a non-Western perspective, which led to the “de-gaying” of Africa’s only gay village. Taking into account the socio-economic value added by gay tourism, the findings provide the first non-Western perspective on the demise of Africa’s and South Africa’s only gay neighbourhood from a gay leisure space owner perspective, including the possible repercussions on Cape Town’s local tourist economy. Some tactical considerations and recommendations are suggested to ensure the continuation of gay tourism in the city.

Details

International Journal of Tourism Cities, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Ben Marder, Caroline Marchant, Chris Archer-Brown, Amy Yau and Jonas Colliander

Acquiring “Likes” for a political party or candidate’s Facebook pages is important for political marketers. For consumers, these “Likes” are conspicuous, making their…

Abstract

Purpose

Acquiring “Likes” for a political party or candidate’s Facebook pages is important for political marketers. For consumers, these “Likes” are conspicuous, making their political affiliation visible to their network. This paper aims to examine the roles of the undesired social-self and visibility (conspicuous vs inconspicuous) in predicting consumers’ intention to “Like” political brands. The authors extend knowledge on the undesired social-self and transference of theory from general marketing to a political domain and provide practical advice for political marketers engaging social network sites.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors gather data from two surveys run with Facebook using electorates in the run up to the UK 2015 and US 2016 elections (n = 1,205) on their intention to “Like” political brands under different visibility conditions.

Findings

Data support the theorized relationship of the undesired social-self with social anxiety intention to “Like” when “Liking” is conspicuous. However, data also indicate that all users – irrespective of proximity to the undesired social-self – prefer to “Like” inconspicuously.

Research limitations/implications

The research is limited by the generalizability of the specific context and the use of self-report measures.

Practical implications

Political marketers should reconsider promoting conspicuous consumption for that which is more inconspicuous.

Originality/value

The authors provide the first examination of the undesired social-self in driving behaviour under different visibility conditions. Furthermore, the authors challenge the extension of existing knowledge of the self-concept within political marketing, based on the “norm” for consumers’ to avoid disclosing political views publically.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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The CASE Journal, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2011

David Higgins and Chris Elliott

The paper aims to explore the changing influences and relevance of passive and experiential methods of learning within what can be described as a new era of…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to explore the changing influences and relevance of passive and experiential methods of learning within what can be described as a new era of entrepreneurial education. What still largely remains unaddressed in the literature is how are entrepreneur's best educated and developed in a manner which can have a direct impact on their personal and business development.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper suggests that learning is action oriented, and that entrepreneurs are not merely “doers”; they are “practitioners”. An integral part of being a “practitioner” is the use of practice to help move the firm beyond the “adaptive” learning which takes place in naturally occurring non‐contrived learning occasions. The paper is theoretical in its intent and adopts a social constructionist view of knowledge and learning. The research approach is informed by practitioner‐based practice and research, education and participation as a process of social learning.

Findings

The development of experiential knowledge in entrepreneurs is an incremental process that evolves throughout the course of their working lives. This means that attempts to stimulate “real life” experience through formal modes of passive education and training are unlikely to have a strong influence or impact on the development of the entrepreneur as a practitioner.

Practical implications

The paper sets out to develop an argument against the traditional “passive” means of business education, by suggesting that entrepreneurs who are exposed to passive learning are spectators rather than active participators.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to our current understanding of entrepreneurial learning by recognising that entrepreneurial learning in the context of higher education takes place beyond the domain of the classroom learning experiences, through experiential and discovery‐based learning which questions traditional orthodox pedagogies. The paper illustrates how knowledge is constructed through a situated practice of knowing, and demonstrates how a practice‐based perspective might be useful for the study of entrepreneurial education.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 35 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2020

Leighanne Higgins

Through adoption of the psycho-emotional model of disability, this study aims to offer consumer research insight into how the marketplace internally oppresses and…

Abstract

Purpose

Through adoption of the psycho-emotional model of disability, this study aims to offer consumer research insight into how the marketplace internally oppresses and psycho-emotionally disables consumers living with impairment.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper draws insight from the interview data of a wider two-year interpretive research study investigating access barriers to marketplaces for consumers living with impairment.

Findings

The overarching contribution offers to consumer research insight into how the marketplace internally oppresses and psycho-emotionally disables consumers living with impairment. Further contributions offered by this paper: unearth the emotion of fear to be central to manifestations of psycho-emotional disability; reveal a broader understanding of the marketplace practices, and core perpetrators, that psycho-emotionally disable consumers living with impairment; and uncover psycho-emotional disability to extend beyond the context of impairment.

Research limitations/implications

This study adopts a UK-only perspective. However, findings uncovered that the model of psycho-emotional disability has wider theoretical value to marketing and consumer research beyond the context of impairment.

Practical implications

The insight offered into the precise marketplace practices that disable consumers living with impairment leads this paper to call for a revising of disability training within marketplace and service contexts.

Originality/value

Extending current consumer research and consumer vulnerability research on disability, the empirical adoption of the psycho-emotional model of disability is a fruitful framework for extrapolating insight into marketplace practices that internally oppress and psycho-emotionally disable consumers living with impairment.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 16 October 2017

Peipei Pan and Chris Patel

The purpose of this paper is to respond to calls in the literature to examine personality variables which may provide sharper insights into accountants’ judgments in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to respond to calls in the literature to examine personality variables which may provide sharper insights into accountants’ judgments in applying principles-based International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS). This paper contributes to the literature on the global convergence of financial reporting by examining the influence of an important personality variable, construal of self, on Chinese accountants’ aggressive financial reporting judgments.

Design/methodology/approach

A between-subjects quasi-experiment was applied. In total, 122 Chinese professional accountants were categorized as either independents or interdependents, on the basis of their scores on construal of self scales. Subjects made their consolidation reporting judgments in the manipulated situations based on the financial performance of the investee entity, which refers to the situation where the investee entity makes a significant profit or a significant loss in the reporting period.

Findings

Compared to interdependent accountants, independent accountants used the flexibility allowed in the principles-based standards to make more aggressive consolidation reporting judgments. Also, adoption of IFRS may not necessarily ensure consistent judgments even within China.

Originality/value

This paper provides empirical evidence of the importance of construal of self in examining accountants’ aggressive judgments. The authors suggest that it may be premature to assume that adoption of IFRS will lead to comparable financial reporting. The findings are relevant to researchers who are interested in examining personality and cultural influences on accountants’ judgments both within and across countries. Companies and organizations may incorporate appropriate strategies to recruit and train independent and interdependent accountants, particularly by addressing the influence of construal of self on aggressive financial reporting judgments.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 30 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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