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Case study
Publication date: 10 September 2019

Roland J. Kushner

The case includes theoretical references to family business, organizational culture, resource-based value and leadership.

Abstract

Theoretical basis

The case includes theoretical references to family business, organizational culture, resource-based value and leadership.

Research methodology

The case combines primary and secondary data. There is ample public information about Martin Guitar including histories of the company and its instruments. These were used for background. Primary data were provided by the company in the form of customized data and interviews.. The case writer has served Martin Guitar as a consultant and also plays Martin instruments. The case writer had numerous opportunities to interview Chris and his key lieutenants.

Case overview/synopsis

In 2019, C.F. Martin IV (Chris) was in his fourth decade leading one of the America’s oldest family-owned companies, C.F. Martin & Co., Inc. Martin Guitar is a globally known maker of fine guitars that are prized by collectors, working musicians and amateur musicians. Chris was raised in the family business and took on the CEO’s position at the age of 30. The case describes the company’s management practices and the culture that has emerged from them. In 2019, at age 64, Chris confronted issues faced by his predecessors over multiple generations: how to prepare the company for succession, and maintain its strong performance as a family-owned company in a dynamic industry environment.

Complexity academic level

The case is designed for a management course for upper-level undergraduates.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2018

Vladlena Benson, Jean-Noel Ezingeard and Chris Hand

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by…

Abstract

Purpose

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood by research. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how purchase intention is affected by social media user traits, cognitive factors (such as perceived control and trust) and individual beliefs, such as risk propensity and trustworthiness.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors propose and empirically test a model of purchase intention on social platforms. The study of over 500 active social media users finds the links between risk propensity, trust, technical efficacy and perceived control and explores the moderating effect of age and gender.

Findings

Purchase intention on social platforms is influenced by demographic factors, cognitive factors and beliefs. Both age and gender moderate the effects of beliefs and cognitive factors: age is a determinant of purchase intention for men, while beliefs are significant for younger women and cognitive factors are significant for older women.

Research limitations/implications

This study involved a cross-sectional design via online survey of social networking users. Gender differences in purchase intentions are found which are, in turn, influenced by age. Further empirical testing of social purchase intention could include less experienced users or non-users.

Practical implications

The results of this study provide guidance for SNS providers and technology developers in social networking commerce in terms of the different drivers of purchase intention.

Originality/value

Social media users’ purchasing behaviour is yet to be fully understood. The study shows that purchase intention antecedents vary between genders and age groups of users. The identified connection between users’ perceptions of social networking sites (SNS) usage of personal information and purchase behaviour has an impact on the likelihood of user engagement in social transactions.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Patricia Harris, Francesca Dall’Olmo Riley, Debra Riley and Chris Hand

Grounded on approach/avoidance behaviour theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of grocery shoppers based on the concomitant perceived advantages and…

Abstract

Purpose

Grounded on approach/avoidance behaviour theory, the purpose of this paper is to develop a typology of grocery shoppers based on the concomitant perceived advantages and disadvantages of shopping online and in store for a single cohort of consumers who buy groceries in both channels.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey design was employed using a sample of 871 UK shoppers who had purchased groceries online and offline. The survey instrument contained items that measured the perceived advantages and disadvantages of grocery shopping online, and items relating to the perceived advantages and disadvantages of grocery shopping in traditional supermarkets. Items were selected from the extant literature and subjected to content and face validity checks. Cluster analysis was used to develop typologies of online and offline grocery shoppers. The inter-relation between the two typology sets was then examined.

Findings

The results of the research provide several insights into the characteristics, perceptions and channel patronage preferences of grocery shoppers. In particular, profiling e-grocery shoppers on the basis of their concomitant perceptions of shopping online and in store suggests that the choice of whether to shop online or in store may be driven not by the perceived advantages of one channel vs the other, but by the desire to avoid the greater disadvantages of the alternative. These perceptions differ somewhat between different consumer groups.

Originality/value

This study makes a noteworthy contribution to the internet and general shopping literature by providing a profile of grocery shoppers based on their concomitant and often conflicting perceived advantages and disadvantages of shopping online and their perceived advantages and disadvantages of shopping in traditional supermarkets. The use of a single cohort of consumers overcomes the bias in previous studies that employ separate cohorts of online and offline shoppers and reveal important insights into the complex perceptions and behaviours of multichannel grocery shoppers.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 8 March 2010

David A. Sanders, Martin Langner and Giles E. Tewkesbury

The purpose of this paper is to present powered‐wheelchair transducers and systems that provide more control, reduced veer on slopes, and improved energy conservation…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present powered‐wheelchair transducers and systems that provide more control, reduced veer on slopes, and improved energy conservation, while reducing effort. They are especially significant for people with movement disorders who lack sufficient hand‐grasp and release ability or sufficient targeting skill to use joysticks.

Design/methodology/approach

Laboratory test rigs are created to test proportional switches and teach potential users. Then, trials are conducted with a rolling road and in real situations. Caster angle‐measurement is selected to provide feedback to minimize drift away from a chosen course and an electronic solution was created to match driver control to caster‐steering‐position. A case study is described as an example.

Findings

Results and advantages are presented from changing from using a set of digital‐switches to a set of new variable‐switches and then adding a sensor system to prevent veer on slopes. Systems have been tested for nearly two years and shown to assist powered‐wheelchair‐users with poor targeting skills.

Research limitations/implications

The research used wheelchairs with caster‐wheels but the systems could easily be used on other wheelchairs.

Practical implications

Simple input‐devices are presented that isolate gross motor function and are tolerant to involuntary movements (proportional‐switches). A sensor system is presented that assists users in steering across sloping or uneven ground.

Originality/value

Proportional‐switches and sensors are shown to reduce veer and provide more control over turn and forward speed and turn radius while reducing frustration and improving energy conservation. The simple and affordable systems could be created and attached to many standard powered‐wheelchairs in many organisations.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 37 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2012

Lynne Millward and Sarah Senker

The purpose of this paper is to consider how male young offenders on community orders made sense of their offending behaviour as well as considering the extent these views…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider how male young offenders on community orders made sense of their offending behaviour as well as considering the extent these views aligned with traditional stereotypes of masculinity.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a qualitative approach, using semi‐structured in‐depth interviews followed by interpretative phenomenological analysis to identify themes within the participant's narratives.

Findings

Two master themes were identified; “dissociating from an offender identity and authoring a new non‐offender identity” as well as “masculinity as multifaceted”. These themes were interpreted using self‐determination theory, highlighting the importance of intrinsic motivation and specific environmental conditions in enabling change and exploration of new identities.

Research limitations/implications

This work was based on a small sample size. Whilst this permitted an in‐depth analysis it is acknowledged that this may have implications for making generalisations across the youth offending population.

Practical implications

This study identifies that the principles of autonomy, relatedness and competence, as outlined in self‐determination theory, potentially offer fruitful areas to be implemented in community orders. Such conditions can help to harness intrinsic motivation to change and self‐regulated behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper is of value to those working and holding an interest within the criminal justice domain. Its adoption of a qualitative approach, considering a UK sample of young offenders on community orders at the time of the interview is unique. This study allows practical recommendations to be made to those engaged in youth rehabilitation.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Chris Hand, Francesca Dall'Olmo Riley, Patricia Harris, Jaywant Singh and Ruth Rettie

This paper seeks to understand the triggers which influence the adoption (and the discontinuation) of online grocery shopping. Specifically, the research aims to establish…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand the triggers which influence the adoption (and the discontinuation) of online grocery shopping. Specifically, the research aims to establish the role of situational factors in the process of adoption.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐step research process is employed. First, exploratory qualitative research is carried out, with the purpose of gaining an in‐depth understanding of consumers' online grocery shopping behaviour. This is followed by a large‐scale quantitative survey extending the findings of the qualitative research and validating the role of situational factors in instigating the commencement (and discontinuation) of online grocery buying. Cluster analysis is used to segment consumers based on the importance of specific types of situations.

Findings

Both qualitative and quantitative results establish the importance of situational factors, such as having a baby or developing health problems, as triggers for starting to buy groceries online. Many shoppers are found to discontinue online grocery shopping once the initial trigger has disappeared or they have experienced a problem with the service.

Practical implications

While situational factors are beyond a marketer's control, they could be used as a basis for marketing communications content and target advertising, for instance, by using magazines directed at new parents.

Originality/value

The importance of situational factors as triggers for the adoption of online grocery shopping suggests an erratic adoption process, driven by circumstances rather than by a cognitive elaboration and decision. The adoption of online shopping seems to be contingent and may be discontinued when the initiating circumstances change.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 43 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

Gay Engelberger

A robotics team at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, under the direction of Dr Robert Ambrose, is developing a new breed of space robots called Robonaut…

Abstract

A robotics team at NASA’s Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas, under the direction of Dr Robert Ambrose, is developing a new breed of space robots called Robonaut. Robonaut, designed to be as human‐like as possible, will be controlled by telepresence and will work in extravehicular activity (EVA) environments, allowing astronauts to remain safely inside the spacecraft.

Details

Industrial Robot: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-991X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 July 2007

Philippa Hankinson, Wendy Lomax and Chris Hand

As staff are vital to successful re‐branding, particularly in the charity sector where restricted budgets limit reliance on external marketing, it is important to…

Abstract

Purpose

As staff are vital to successful re‐branding, particularly in the charity sector where restricted budgets limit reliance on external marketing, it is important to understand the impact of re‐branding on staff. This study aims to examine the effect of time on staff knowledge, attitudes and behaviour and, in addition, the interaction of time with seniority, tenure and level of support for re‐branding.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper first explores the literature from both the for‐profit and non‐profit sectors. A quantitative study was undertaken in nine leading, UK charities that had re‐branded two, three and four years ago; n=345. The data were analysed using one‐way and two‐way ANOVAs.

Findings

A negative relationship was found between time since re‐branding and the three constructs of knowledge, attitudes and behaviour. But this consistency was not mirrored by a consistency in the impact of interaction effects.

Practical implications

Re‐branding is not a one‐off event. To sustain its benefits, organizations need to re‐visit its outcomes on a regular basis to ensure staff retain new knowledge, remain positively motivated and maintain their recently adapted behaviours over time.

Originality/value

Thought to be the first empirical paper to explore the effects of re‐branding over time. Furthermore, the findings contradict those from the extant literature that claim that organizational change requires a “settling in” period. By contrast these findings suggest that the positive effects of re‐branding are best felt in the immediate wake of re‐branding and thereafter fade over time.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1932

If we could be made moral by Act of Parliament there would be no such things as “ hold ups ” and food sophistication. Of these two evils I should prefer the former had I…

Abstract

If we could be made moral by Act of Parliament there would be no such things as “ hold ups ” and food sophistication. Of these two evils I should prefer the former had I the choice. It is no more blameworthy, it is less harmful, and it is not likely to become a permanent feature of our social life. A successful “ hold up ” is by the nature of the case self‐advertising. It forms the basis for a “ drama ” or a “ sensation.” It “sells well” and is honoured with “displayed” head lines. On the other hand, a police chase at sixty miles an hour over half a county when the true nature of raspberry jam is in question is unthinkable. Publicity, if you can get it, has, like adversity, its “ sweet uses.” It makes the public “ sit up and take notice” and brings the offence, if not the offender, into the limelight. But the chase of, what A. H. Allen, of Sheffield, once called, “ the poor unfortunate adulterator ” calls frequently for a degree of ingenuity on the part of the executive officers of a local authority that suggests the wonders of detective fiction. The sport may require a good deal of ground bait before the fish is hooked, or, to vary the metaphor, several full dress rehearsals before the one and only performance is staged and the fine of one guinea and costs inflicted. Our “hold up” friend “does time,” and for the period of his sentence can do no further mischief, while the merchant in search of illicit profits seldom gets further than the police court, and if a large business concern which has “ neither a body to be kicked or a soul to be damned ” happens to be the offender, then eminent counsel is briefed, legal entities and quiddities are politely discussed, no one's feelings are hurt, a fine may be inflicted—which, in any case, is relatively trifling and is written off as a bad debt—and “the prisoner leaves the court amid the congratulations of his friends.” In neither case is the slightest social injury inflicted. Bill of Pimlico or Walworth has nothing to lose, the “ directors ” have lost nothing. If the way of transgressors be hard, then the case of the adulterator is the exception which proves the rule.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 34 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2017

Abstract

Details

Reflections on Sociology of Sport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-643-3

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