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Article

Chris Gardiner and John Henneberry

Develops a habit‐persistence model which is based on the assumptionthat experience conditions present behaviour and expectations. Notesthat the model combines the adaptive…

Abstract

Develops a habit‐persistence model which is based on the assumption that experience conditions present behaviour and expectations. Notes that the model combines the adaptive expectations hypothesis with the partial adjustment process. Concludes that accurate forecasts for declining regions are produced but the results for growing regions are not significant.

Details

Journal of Property Valuation and Investment, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-2712

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Article

Chris Gardiner and John Henneberry

Attempts to describe the determinants of rent. Describes theinitial stages in the development of a regional office rent predictionmodel which uses readily available data…

Abstract

Attempts to describe the determinants of rent. Describes the initial stages in the development of a regional office rent prediction model which uses readily available data and should aid the investment decision‐making process. Rejects cross‐sectional analysis, preferring time series approaches. Formulates a spatially disaggregated model which allows for delays between changes in user output and changes in user demand, and which reflects the variable adjustment rate between these two factors. Argues that the combined influence of the independent variables in the derived equation can explain up to 97 per cent of the variation in rent over the period examined.

Details

Journal of Valuation, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7480

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Article

Elliroma Gardiner and Chris J Jackson

Maverickism is the tendency of an individual to be socially competent, creative, goal focussed, risk-taking and disruptive. Previous research with the five-factor model…

Abstract

Purpose

Maverickism is the tendency of an individual to be socially competent, creative, goal focussed, risk-taking and disruptive. Previous research with the five-factor model (FFM) shows that individuals high in maverickism exhibit both functional and dysfunctional tendencies. The purpose of this paper is to compare and contrast the descriptive FFM with the process-oriented hybrid model of learning in personality (HMLP), in the prediction of maverickism.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a cross-sectional design with 490 full-time workers the authors use the NEO-International Personality Item Pool and the Learning Styles Profiler to examine differences in the FFM and HMLP in the prediction of maverickism.

Findings

Results with the FFM, identify extraversion, openness and (low) agreeableness as significant predictors of maverickism. All factors of the HMLP (except conscientious learning) significantly predict maverickism. Hierarchal regression analysis shows that the HMLP accounts for an additional 21 percent of variance in maverickism over and above that of the FFM.

Research limitations/implications

The authors have tested and built theory by identifying not only what predicts maverickism, but also how the learning processes of the HMLP interrelate to predict maverickism.

Practical implications

Managers interested in developing the maverick potential of their employees will find this study useful because it identifies what to look for in maverick workers.

Social implications

Individuals high in maverickism have the potential for radical innovation. Understanding how to identify and develop these individuals may lead to larger societal benefits.

Originality/value

The authors are the first to use the HMLP to test maverickism. The research highlights the importance of both personality and learning processes in maverickism.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 30 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Book part

Debra Talbot

The influence of extralocally produced texts, such as professional standards and systems of accreditation, on the ruling relations that govern teachers’ work and their…

Abstract

The influence of extralocally produced texts, such as professional standards and systems of accreditation, on the ruling relations that govern teachers’ work and their learning about that work is a matter of concern in Australia, as it is in Canada, UK, and USA. This chapter explains how a dialogic analysis and the construction of individual maps of social relations were employed to reveal the influences that governed teachers’ learning about their work at the frontline. A dialogic analysis of research conversations about learning, based on the work of Mikhail Bakhtin, revealed the existence of both centralizing, hegemonic discourses associated with a managerial agenda and contextualized, heterogeneous discourses supportive of transformative learning. It also revealed the uneven influence of extralocally produced governing texts on both the locally produced texts and the “doings” of individuals. The production and use of “individual” maps represents a variation on the way “mapping” has generally been used by institutional ethnographers. From these informant specific maps, we can begin to observe some broad patterns in relation to the coordination of people’s “doings” both within a given context and from one context to another.

Details

Perspectives on and from Institutional Ethnography
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-653-2

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Article

Chris Phillips

A British invention capable of mapping the entire earth's atmosphere every 24 hours won deserved acclaim when—in the face of stiff American competition—it was included in…

Abstract

A British invention capable of mapping the entire earth's atmosphere every 24 hours won deserved acclaim when—in the face of stiff American competition—it was included in NASA's Nimbus satellite programme.

Details

Industrial Management, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-6929

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Article

Ann Bergman and Jean Gardiner

The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of availability, both empirically and theoretically, in the context of three Swedish organisations, and identifies…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the concept of availability, both empirically and theoretically, in the context of three Swedish organisations, and identifies the structural influences on availability patterns for work and family.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on quantitative case studies using employer records and an employee questionnaire in three organisations. Multivariate descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression are used to illustrate and analyse patterns of availability for work and family.

Findings

The descriptive data demonstrate the influence of the organisational context and type of production process, as well as gender, on availability patterns. Patterns of work availability appeared to differ across the organisations to a greater extent than patterns of family availability, which were highly gendered. The logistic regression results indicated that: occupation was a significant influence on both temporal and spatial availability patterns across the organisations; gender was the most significant influence on time spent on household work and part‐time working for parents with young children; age of employees and age of employees' children were the most significant factors influencing the use of time off work for family.

Research limitations/implications

Analysis limited to case studies. More extensive quantitative research would be needed to make empirical generalisations. Qualitative research would be needed to establish whether and how employees are able to make use of different availability patterns to improve their work‐life balance.

Originality/value

The concept of availability is a new way of trying to capture and analyse tensions in people's everyday lives as they try to manage multiple demands.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Strategic HR Review, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1475-4398

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Article

Nigel Craig, Nick Pilcher, Rebecca MacKenzie and Chris Boothman

The UK private housebuilding sector is the key supplier of new-build homes for customers, constituting a fifth of the entire UK construction industry. Yet, despite the…

Abstract

Purpose

The UK private housebuilding sector is the key supplier of new-build homes for customers, constituting a fifth of the entire UK construction industry. Yet, despite the high average cost of houses, and official reports advocating improvement, the sector remains blighted by criticism and a negative image of its quality. However, social media now offers customers new sources of advice and information. In this context, the purpose of this paper is to analyse social media forum posts from new-build homebuyers to reveal perceptions of the industry and illustrate the value of such data for others.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents and thematically analyses 147 comment posts from nine online Facebook forums under the themes of safety; standards; quality; workmanship; customer service; finance and money; advice; National House Building Council; ombudsman; and page closures.

Findings

Customers express frustration, anger, feelings of neglect and of an abdication of responsibility by the sector. Fundamentally, change is suggested at a systemic level, and it is urged this occurs through powerful and independent bodies.

Originality/value

To date, social media data has not been analysed in the context of the housebuilding sector. Yet, such data is key not only for its open and wide-reaching nature but also because it can be incorporated into government reports. It is hoped such data will be used by the new home ombudsman the UK Government hopes to establish in 2020 and help rectify many of the performance issues experienced and protect homebuyers.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article

Doris Ruth Eikhof, Chris Warhurst and Axel Haunschild

The purpose of this article is to initiate critical reflection on the assumptions and evidence underpinning the work‐life balance debate.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to initiate critical reflection on the assumptions and evidence underpinning the work‐life balance debate.

Design/methodology/approach

The article reviews a range of international literature focused on and related to the work‐life balance debate and issues.

Findings

In the work‐life balance debate, over‐work is perceived as the problem. Nevertheless, beyond working time and the provision of flexible working practices to enable child care, there is little in the debate abut the need to change work per se. The debate also narrowly perceives “life”, equating it with women's care work, hence the emphasis again of family‐friendly polices.

Research limitations/implications

The article suggests that reconceptualisation is required in analyses of both work‐life balance and the relationship between work and life.

Practical implications

The article implies that current work‐life balance policies are myopic in terms of addressing the needs and aspirations of employees.

Originality/value

The article offers a synthesis of evidence that is wider than that typical in current analyses of work and life.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Michael Clark, Charlie Murphy, Tony Jameson-Allen and Chris Wilkins

The purpose of this paper is to promote discussion about, and the development of the evidence-base underpinning integrated working for intergenerational working. It…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to promote discussion about, and the development of the evidence-base underpinning integrated working for intergenerational working. It discusses perspectives on intergenerational work in general and specifically draws on case experiences of the use of intergenerational reminiscence based on sporting memories to highlight issues pertaining to integrated working.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper presents a general discussion of issues of intergenerational projects and integrated working, with case discussions of the use of sporting memories as an intervention for focusing intergenerational contact.

Findings

It is concluded that intergenerational work has much to offer but that it is far from clear how best to organise integrated working for this type of work. There are interesting lessons to be drawn for intergenerational interventions and integrated working from the case study discussions.

Research limitations/implications

Although case studies can provide crucial in-depth knowledge they can be limited in developing evidence we can be sure is more generalisable across contexts. Hence, further research is required into the impact of intergenerational projects, and how best to maximise this through effective integrated working.

Practical implications

The discussion and case study materials suggest there is much potential in using intergenerational projects to achieve a range of possible outcomes but it is not clear how integrated working is best operationalised in such work. Care is required about clarity concerning the aims of specific projects, but practitioners and others should be encouraged to carefully explore this area of work.

Social implications

The challenges of an ageing society are significant, as is the need to maintain intergenerational contact, mutuality and the implicit social contract across generations. Specifically developing opportunities for such contact may help achieve this and a range of other positive outcomes.

Originality/value

This paper brings together a discussion of intergenerational projects with consideration of the challenges of integrated working, and adds specific case study lessons from the use of sports-based reminiscence.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 24 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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