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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Tina Perry, Michael Barkham and Chris Evans

The purpose of this paper is to establish staff and patient opinions on the acceptability, feasibility, and utility of using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluations …

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to establish staff and patient opinions on the acceptability, feasibility, and utility of using the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluations – Outcome Measure (CORE‐OM) in secure hospitals.

Design/methodology/approach

Patients and nurses (male patients and their key workers) from high, medium and low secure hospitals participated in semi‐structured interviews after completing CORE‐OM or CORE‐OM (SV).

Findings

Template themes were acceptability, feasibility, relevance, suitability, changes to treatment, and understanding. Findings suggest that the CORE‐OM is acceptable and potentially useful in secure settings.

Practical implications

This paper suggests that the CORE‐OM is acceptable to patients and staff in secure settings and appears to be a feasible measure for such settings. Further research and accumulation of a referential database of item scores is needed for PROMS, including the CORE‐OM, to be fully useful in secure settings.

Originality/value

This paper will be of use to clinicians working with forensic mental health settings. It is one of only two papers which investigate the use of the CORE‐OM in forensic settings.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Chris Blasband, Jim Bleak and Gus Schultz

As real‐time, high‐fidelity visual scene simulation has become ubiquitous in the training, modeling and simulation community, a growing need for more than “out‐the‐window”…

Abstract

As real‐time, high‐fidelity visual scene simulation has become ubiquitous in the training, modeling and simulation community, a growing need for more than “out‐the‐window” scene simulation has developed. A strong requirement has developed for the ability to simulate the output of different types of sensors, especially electro‐optical (EO), infrared (IR), night vision goggle (NVG) and radar systems. To satisfy the need for advanced sensor simulation, Evans & Sutherland (E&S) has developed a physics‐based, dynamic, real‐time sensor simulation which allows users to model advanced EO, IR and NVG devices that are fully correlated with the “out‐the‐window” visual view. In this paper, the unique sensor simulation capabilities of E&S will be described. A brief description of the physics employed, input and output are presented along with example images.

Details

Sensor Review, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0260-2288

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Zahir Irani and Chris Evans and Raymond Hackney

Abstract

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 27 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

James Rowe

The purpose of this paper is to argue that leadership cannot and should not be “defined” but rather considered as a process. The paper goes on to refute the notion that…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to argue that leadership cannot and should not be “defined” but rather considered as a process. The paper goes on to refute the notion that leadership can be defined or fully understood in management terms or associations. The paper then attempts to synthesise the construct of leadership as a system of processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper compares and contrasts management and leadership to three organisational processes; time, culture and change in order to non‐define or synthesise a system of leadership.

Findings

Leadership might be more usefully understood as a process of individual and organisational engagement with time, culture and change that differ from management's relationships with these processes. That through these engagements leadership creates organisation whilst management maintains it.

Research limitations/implications

The paper does not explore other systemic constructs that might be equally fruitful such as leadership and management in relation to entropy and negentropy.

Practical implications

The paper is attempting to demonstrate that organisations may need to create leadership in tandem with management rather than find individual leaders “defined” as able to lead.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to consider leadership as a process of interrelationships rather than a separate definable behaviour or competence.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 35 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2002

Chris Evans and Jing Ping Fan

Lifelong learning has come to involve a variety of learning experiences. These include conventional campus teaching, workplace open learning, modular flexible learning…

Abstract

Lifelong learning has come to involve a variety of learning experiences. These include conventional campus teaching, workplace open learning, modular flexible learning programmes, correspondence‐based distance learning courses, and most recently Web or multimedia‐based courseware. This paper considers the use of multimedia environments for open, flexible and distance education, in particular a learning environment known as the “Virtual University” as part of a process of lifelong learning. A comparison of different modes of learning is made. The Virtual University consists of virtual lectures, virtual seminars, virtual tutorials and virtual exams. It has a number of advantages over both formal lectures and conventional open learning materials, such as interactivity, adaptation, simulation, demonstration and integration. A questionnaire survey was conducted to assess the effectiveness of the Virtual University, and the results indicate an enhancement of the overall learning experience.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 28 April 2010

Gary Byrne, Sean Hammond and Philip Moore

With the increased need for quantitative measures of accountability and effectiveness in the therapeutic setting, standardised outcome measures have come to the fore. This…

Abstract

With the increased need for quantitative measures of accountability and effectiveness in the therapeutic setting, standardised outcome measures have come to the fore. This study aimed to assess the psychometric quality of the Clinical Outcomes in Routine Evaluation (CORE‐OM) used with an Irish population of adult victims of childhood abuse. The study indicated that the outcome measure was a useful tool in a forensic therapeutic setting, despite issues regarding the CORE's factor structure. The study also found that the service assessed matched the benchmarks laid down by the CORE systems group regarding levels of change brought about by therapeutic interventions, further indicating the benefits of CORE. The study discusses these issues and possible recommendations for aiding better integration of CORE's findings within therapy and broader clinical practice.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2008

Herbert Sherman, Thomas C. Leach and Daniel J. Rowley

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze Sabre Yachts, a firm that manufactures specialty sail and power boats.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and analyze Sabre Yachts, a firm that manufactures specialty sail and power boats.

Design/methodology/approach

A case research method including field interviews and secondary research was carried out. The case describes the dilemma that the Marketing Manager, Bentley Collins of Sabre Yachts faced in developing a profitable marketing mix given the firm's competitors, product line, industry and national economic trends and provides an analysis of the situation through structured case questions and answers.

Findings

Sabre decided to “stick to the knitting” (Peters and Waterman) and not expand geographically, as the authors suggested, into the largest state market segments. Instead, they took a more conservative approach and expanded their product line which expanded the breadth of their market into other boat market (size) segments.

Originality/value

The case analysis applies strategic management and marketing concepts to a specific real‐life business situation and demonstrates the value of using theory in practice.

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 9 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2000

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Sports Marketing and Sponsorship, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6668

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Abstract

Details

Tattoos and Popular Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-215-2

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Case study
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Thomas C. Leach, Barry R. Armandi and Herbert Sherman

Derived from field interviews and secondary research, the case describes the dilemma that the Marketing Manager Bentley Collins of Sabre Yachts faces in developing a…

Abstract

Derived from field interviews and secondary research, the case describes the dilemma that the Marketing Manager Bentley Collins of Sabre Yachts faces in developing a profitable marketing mix given the firm's current product line, competitors, industry and national economic trends. Sabre had always been a niche boat builder. Their product line was divided into two distinct categories; sail boats and power boats. Their sailboats were targeted toward boaters interested in the comfort desired for cruising but also the capability of competitive racing while their power boats were designed to be modern yachts that could cruise 20 knots or better. A majority of sales came from the New England and Mid-Atlantic regions with only sporadic success in other areas. Bentley worried that slower phone traffic in Spring of 2001 would be indicative of slower sales and wanted to know what actions the firm should take to continue their regional growth as well as their push to become a more nationally-based firm. The case has a difficulty level appropriate for a junior or senior level course. The case is designed to be taught in one class period and is expected to require between five to seven hours of outside preparation by students.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

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