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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Christopher Dodge

The winter 1991 issue of Reference Services Review featured an annotated bibliography of literature on Christopher Columbus from 1970 to 1989. That literature covered such…

Abstract

The winter 1991 issue of Reference Services Review featured an annotated bibliography of literature on Christopher Columbus from 1970 to 1989. That literature covered such topics as Columbus' ancestry, heraldry, and the locations of both his American landfall and burial site. This annotated checklist focuses mainly on Columbus' legacy, on works that offer a dissenting point of view from most previous writings about Columbus (and on works that react to the dissenters), on material written by Native American and other non‐European authors, and on materials published by small and noncommercial presses.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1991

Chris Dodge

Members attending a mass meeting at the American Library Associations's 1990 annual conference passed a resolution calling for libraries to “provide Columbus…

Abstract

Members attending a mass meeting at the American Library Associations's 1990 annual conference passed a resolution calling for libraries to “provide Columbus Quincentennial programs and materials which examine the event from an authentic Native American perspective, dealing directly with topics like cultural imperialism, colonialism, and the Native American holocaust.” But have libraries done anything since then to provide alternatives to the likes of Samuel Eliot Morison's purple prose? What attempts have been made to confront the omissions, half‐truths and myths about Columbus?

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Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1993

Chris Dodge

The following list focuses on, but is not limited to, lesser‐known printed publications which feature writing and images about sex and sexual politics. Besides…

Abstract

The following list focuses on, but is not limited to, lesser‐known printed publications which feature writing and images about sex and sexual politics. Besides representing a fair amount of irreverence, satire, scholarship, and unabashed eroticism, the list includes citations for material on topics sure to offend: pedophilia (some would say child abuse) and fetishism, to name just two. For an extensive list of more mainstream sex periodicals, consult Ulrich's International Periodicals Directory (Bowker). Don't bother looking there for categories like EROTICA or SEX, however. Ulrich's cities titles like Gent (“Home of the D‐cups”), Penthouse (circulation 2 million, but how many library subscriptions?), Swinging Times, and Uncut (“The magazine of the natural man”), under MEN'S INTERESTS, while some gay and lesbian erotica appears under the heading HOMOSEXUALITY. Also: while accounting for very little sexually‐oriented material of a general nature—Playboy (under MEN), Playgirl (under WOMEN), and Yellow Silk (under GENERAL EDITORIAL)—Bill and Linda Katz's Magazines for libraries, another Bowker publication, features an extensive annotated bibliography of lesbian and gay periodicals (Polly Thistlethwaite and Daniel Tsang, compilers), which includes titles like NAMBLA Bulletin: Voice of the North American Man/Boy Love Association and On Our Backs.

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Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

Chris Dodge

Randy Pitman, an eloquent critic of librarians' print bias, has publicly noted a fact that should be obvious: referring to audiovisual materials in terms of what they are…

Abstract

Randy Pitman, an eloquent critic of librarians' print bias, has publicly noted a fact that should be obvious: referring to audiovisual materials in terms of what they are not (e.g., “non‐book materials”) automatically affords them second‐class status. Another media activist, Don Roberts, asserts that many selectors of multimedia library materials consider them to be “frivolous, secondary, or just plain negligible in content by comparison with printed materials.” In an article published twelve years ago which offered practical suggestions for overcoming “ingrained and inherent ‘printism,’” he listed alternative media producers and distributors, noted review sources outside the standard library literature, and provided other ideas for countering “the mistaken belief that you are required to leave your high‐fidelity, sensory‐aware self at home, or in your car, or at the concert hall, when you go to work at the library.” Today, he still finds “people who continue to specialize in formats, sentimentalize them, and try to perpetuate this or that medium as the pinnacle of consciousness…sometimes denying others access to formats which might be more appropriate to them in the process.” We are all multimedia beings, Roberts says: There is no way that books alone will enable us to “transform, inspire, and enliven.” Compiled with those thoughts in mind, the following annotated list of media producers and distributors which specialize in social issues—ethnicity, labor, peace, environment, and human rights, to name a few—primarily emphasizes independent and less well‐known media productions. Also worth noting are review sources like Angle—a publication covering work by women filmmakers (P.O. Box 11916, Milwaukee, Wl 53211, 414–963–8951; $20 individual, $30 institutional), Black Film Review (P.O. Box 18665, Washington, DC 20036; $12 individual, $24 institutional), and the lesbian/gay‐oriented Out in Video (Persona Press, Box 14022, San Francisco, CA 94114; $10).

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Collection Building, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1992

Chris Dodge

An earlier version of this list was developed in conjunction with a program held at the 1990 conference of the Minnesota Library Association (“Racism: What Can Libraries…

Abstract

An earlier version of this list was developed in conjunction with a program held at the 1990 conference of the Minnesota Library Association (“Racism: What Can Libraries Do?”). The intention is not to be complete—notice, for example, the absence of Ebony and Jet—but rather to provide a selection of less commonly known periodical resources.

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Collection Building, vol. 11 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Chris Atton

This article introduces the infoshop movement, a network of independent information centres run by political activists throughout Europe and the USA. The article defines…

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Abstract

This article introduces the infoshop movement, a network of independent information centres run by political activists throughout Europe and the USA. The article defines and describes the nature of the infoshop, the services it provides and the nature of its organisation. It then goes on to present a theoretical model for the infoshop, based in particular on Hakim Bey’s concept of the “temporary autonomous zone”. It examines the significance of the infoshop as a node in the complex networks of information‐exchange and activism that constitute the contemporary “alternative public sphere”. It notes the autonomous, non‐hierarchical nature of infoshops and how they might be thought of as “free spaces” connected by complex, though informal, communications networks. Finally, it proposes that infoshops play a key role in developing autonomy, solidarity and reflexivity in the creative processes of activist politics.

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New Library World, vol. 100 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article
Publication date: 18 April 2008

Rowena Koh

This article aims to show both the importance of collecting zines, particularly in public libraries, and the issues and challenges associated with the management of such a…

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1530

Abstract

Purpose

This article aims to show both the importance of collecting zines, particularly in public libraries, and the issues and challenges associated with the management of such a unique collection.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on the research of recent literature, zine‐related web sites, and library catalogues. Examples of current zine collections are frequently discussed.

Findings

The study finds that, although zines provide many challenges in the area of collection management, suitable solutions can be found. These challenges, therefore, should not be an excuse for the lack of zine collections found in libraries today.

Originality/value

This article provides a complete picture of the collection management of zines and discusses practical solutions to address the challenges involved by pointing several examples of successful zine collections.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1995

Vianne T. Sha

Many approaches have been taken by different groups to collect, organise, archive, disseminate and preserve electronic resources on Internet. Some projects, such as…

Abstract

Many approaches have been taken by different groups to collect, organise, archive, disseminate and preserve electronic resources on Internet. Some projects, such as WebCrawler, Lycos, etc., purport to index or organise the electronic resources automatically. Another approach, led by the Clearinghouse for Subject‐Oriented Internet Resource Guides, involves human intelligence to identify and compile Internet resources by subjects for public access. The third category is the traditional library cataloguing approach. This paper demonstrates the benefits of the MARC formats, the importance of the integration of information resources, and the guarantee of public access as the major reasons for using the traditional cataloguing approach to organise Internet resources. Since cataloguing the Internet is a huge project, and various groups are involved in this process, the roles of each related group are discussed.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1999

Brian H. Kleiner

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal…

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Abstract

Devotes the entire journal issue to managing human behaviour in US industries, with examples drawn from the airline industry, trading industry, publishing industry, metal products industry, motor vehicle and parts industry, information technology industry, food industry, the airline industry in a turbulent environment, the automotive sales industry, and specialist retailing industry. Outlines the main features of each industry and the environment in which it is operating. Provides examples, insights and quotes from Chief Executive Officers, managers and employees on their organization’s recipe for success. Mentions the effect technology has had in some industries. Talks about skilled and semi‐skilled workers, worker empowerment and the formation of teams. Addresses also the issue of change and the training that is required to deal with it in different industry sectors. Discusses remuneration packages and incentives offered to motivate employees. Notes the importance of customers in the face of increased competition. Extracts from each industry sector the various human resource practices that companies employ to manage their employees effectively ‐ revealing that there is a wide diversity in approach and what is right for one industry sector would not work in another. Offers some advice for managers, but, overall, fails to summarize what constitutes effective means of managing human behaviour.

Details

Management Research News, vol. 22 no. 2/3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Book part
Publication date: 13 March 2019

Emilio Audissino

The Final Girls (Todd Strauss-Schulson, 2015) is the story of a group of teenage friends that, during the screening of a Friday the 13th-like 1980s slasher horror, happen…

Abstract

The Final Girls (Todd Strauss-Schulson, 2015) is the story of a group of teenage friends that, during the screening of a Friday the 13th-like 1980s slasher horror, happen to be sucked into the film. Trapped in the gruesome narrative, they have to survive the deranged killer that haunts the premises of the campsite by applying their knowledge of the rules and cliches of the slasher genre. The film is of interest not only because it mixes horror and comedy and exaggerates the horror genre’s conventions – as Scream and other neo-slashers already did. By employing the device of the screen rupture, the film constructs a complex network of self-reflexive moments and intertextual references. The metalinguistic play involves in particular the notoriously sexophobic and gender-led dynamics of the 1980s slashers – those more emancipated girls who have sex are killed; the most prudish girl is the one that eventually manages to defeat the monster, the ‘Final Girl’. In this sense, the film is almost like a video essay that reprises and illustrates one of the most seminal study of the slasher genre, Carol Clover’s 1992 Men, Women, and Chainsaws: Gender in the Modern Horror Film. The chapter presents the defining elements of the slasher subgenre as theorized by Clover and then focusses on the analysis of the metalinguistic elements of The Final Girls vis-à-vis Clover’s classic text.

Details

Gender and Contemporary Horror in Film
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-898-7

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