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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

Phyllis Annesley, Leonie Davison, Chris Colley, Liz Gilley and Louise Thomson

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation and evaluation of interventions for women firesetters in high secure mental healthcare at the UK’s National…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the implementation and evaluation of interventions for women firesetters in high secure mental healthcare at the UK’s National Women’s Service.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of Arson treatment programmes for women, one delivered to individuals, the other within a group context, were developed, delivered and evaluated. The evaluation incorporated qualitative and quantitative data, including psychometric measures. Qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

The evaluation evidenced very high engagement with and attendance at treatment programmes, and several post-treatment gains. Participants’ ratings of programmes and qualitative feedback were similarly very positive. The study demonstrated that engaging women firesetters in their treatment is paramount and can be facilitated by consistent boundaries around therapy provision balanced with sensitivity, empathy and flexibility; providing interactive and varied teaching methods; ongoing service user involvement and recognising participants’ achievements; employing a mixed cognitive analytic therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy therapeutic approach; having input from fire service staff; and maintaining organisational support for firesetting interventions.

Practical implications

In all, 12 key recommendations are made for clinicians considering offering treatment programmes for women firesetters.

Originality/value

Amid few published papers on treating women firesetters this paper guides forensic clinicians in establishing and delivering interventions for women firesetters.

Details

Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Lynn Revell and Hazel Bryan

Abstract

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Fundamental British Values in Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-507-8

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Book part
Publication date: 19 June 2018

Pauwke Berkers and Julian Schaap

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Gender Inequality in Metal Music Production
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-674-7

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Book part
Publication date: 22 August 2014

Kabba E. Colley

This chapter focuses on a study, which investigates the question: How do teacher education policies match teacher education practices in Anglophone West Africa? Teacher…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on a study, which investigates the question: How do teacher education policies match teacher education practices in Anglophone West Africa? Teacher education policy in this chapter refers to action statements in verbal or written form made by national education authorities/agencies about teacher education, while teacher education practice refers to the work that teachers do. Using the method of research synthesis, multi-layered, purposeful sampling of various data sources, Boolean and non-Boolean search strategies, qualitative and quantitative analytical procedures, the study identified over a hundred documents. Out of these, 77 documents met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The distribution of research outcomes by Anglophone West African countries were as follows: 18.2% were on Gambia, 27.3% were on Ghana, 10.4% were on Liberia, 24.7% were on Nigeria, and 19.5% were on Sierra Leone. From this research synthesis, it is evident that there is a gap between teacher education policy and practice in Anglophone West Africa. Most teacher education policies are “add-on,” meaning that they were formulated as part of a larger national policy framework on basic, secondary and tertiary education. In addition, the research synthesis found that Gambia, Ghana, Nigeria, and Sierra Leone are very similar in terms of their pre-service teacher training models, but differ in their in-service and professional development systems, while Liberia has a slightly different in-service model with varying durations. The limitations and implications of the findings for further comparative and international education research are discussed in the chapter.

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Annual Review of Comparative and International Education 2014
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-453-4

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Article
Publication date: 27 March 2009

Chris Poullaos

This paper seeks to examine the social construction of the racialised, colonial subaltern accountant in the British imperial centre in the early twentieth century..

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to examine the social construction of the racialised, colonial subaltern accountant in the British imperial centre in the early twentieth century..

Design/methodology/approach

Primary sources are used to provide an historical analysis of the British accountancy arena in the 1920s, this being the period when “race thinking” first became explicit. Secondary histories of race and empire are used to contextualise this analysis by highlighting: the growth of “race thinking” in the latter part of the nineteenth and the early decades of the twentieth centuries; and the American challenge to British imperial hegemony after the First World War.

Findings

This paper tracks the struggles of British accountants in the imperial centre in the 1920s to find a path between racialist attitudes in the imperial centre, their own included and countervailing discourses of non‐discrimination. For the Scottish chartered bodies, this involved the development of a de facto barrier to entry when a proposed de jure one aroused, surprisingly enough, the prospect of retaliation from American accountants.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations in the primary sources preclude detailed examination of the attitudes of individuals or for all variations in the positions adopted by particular bodies.

Practical implications

The troubling thing about the demise of explicit race talk by the end of the 1920s is that de facto barriers to the entry of the racialised, subordinated Other remained in place.

Originality/value

This paper shows that the rise of race thinking in Britain did not leave British accountancy untouched; largely through the pressure it placed upon the identity of British accountants qua Britons and the consequential issue of inclusion/exclusion of non‐Britons.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 18 March 2021

Paul Crawford and Jamie Orion Crawford

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Cabin Fever
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-355-0

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1971

The Food Hygiene (General) Regulations, 1970, when they first appeared, seem to have attracted more notice in the daily press than in the specialist journals, although…

Abstract

The Food Hygiene (General) Regulations, 1970, when they first appeared, seem to have attracted more notice in the daily press than in the specialist journals, although, while re‐enacting much that was in the 1960 regulations, which they repeal, the new measures break new and important ground, as well as introducing a number of amending provisions, which experience has shown were needed. We tend to associate hygiene needs of food and drink with the thronging streets of the city and town, the hidden backrooms of restaurants, the bustling market and the mobile food van, which, in this motorized age, has ousted the bawling backstreet hucksterer.

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British Food Journal, vol. 73 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Gender Inequality in Metal Music Production
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-674-7

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Article
Publication date: 20 May 2020

Rowena Catipay Buyan, Jill Aylott and Duncan Carratt

Over half of adults under the age of 65 years will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives (Ahmad et al., 2015). Demand for services is outstripping the…

Abstract

Purpose

Over half of adults under the age of 65 years will be diagnosed with cancer at some point in their lives (Ahmad et al., 2015). Demand for services is outstripping the capacity in the NHS, as 77% of NHS Trusts are unable to start treatment within 62 days (Baker, 2019; NHS England, 2019). Side effects of treatment can be life threatening (Tsai et al., 2010) with many patients attending ED; however, these can be managed through a hospital’s Acute Oncology Service (AOS). This paper aims to explore a collaborative leadership approach to improve services for patients [Rubin et al., 2015; Department of Health (DOH), 2012].

Design/methodology/approach

A case study of an AOS in an NHS Trust was the focus for the development of a strategy of ‘Collaborative’ leadership, with the aim to increase the engagement of a wide network of clinical and non-clinical stakeholders in a review of the AOS. The case study identified the level of effectiveness of the service since its inception in 2012. Using a quality improvement methodology (Deming 2000; Health Foundation, 2011; Aylott, 2019) resulted in learning and increased collaboration between clinical and non-clinical staff.

Findings

Action learning processes revealed that AOS staff had been frustrated for some time about the dysfunction of the current process to manage the increased demand for the service. They reported their perceptions and frustrations with the current process of referral and patient discharge. Data revealed alerts from the Emergency Department (ED) to AOS resulted in 72% of patients inappropriately referred, with an over representation of patients who had a previous existing cancer condition. Clinical engagement with the data informatics manager (DC) revealed a need to improve data quality through improvements made to the database.

Research limitations/implications

Increasing demand for cancer services requires a continuous need for improvement to meet patient needs. Cancer waits for diagnostic tests are at their highest level since 2008, with 4% of patients waiting over 6 weeks to be tested compared to the tested target of 1% (Baker, 2019). This paper draws on data collected from 2017 to 2018, but a continuous review of data is required to measure the performance of the AOS against its service specification. Every AOS team across the NHS could benefit from a collaborative learning approach.

Practical implications

Clinical services need collaborative support from informatics to implement a Quality Improvement methodology such as the IHI Model for Improvement (IHI, 2003). Without collaboration the implementation of a quality improvement strategy for all NHS Trusts will not come to fruition (Kings Fund, 2016). Quality Improvement Strategies must be developed with a collaborative leadership implementation plan that includes patient collaboration strategies (Okpala, 2018), as this is the only way that services will be improved while also becoming cost effective (Okpala, 2018).

Social implications

In the UK, 20-25% of new cancer diagnoses are made following an initial presentation to the ED (Young et al., 2016). Cancer-related attendances at ED had a higher level of acuity, requiring longer management time and length of stay in ED. With cancer care contributing to 12% of all hospital admissions, an increase of 25% over the past two decades (Kuo et al., 2017) the AOS will need continued collaboration between clinical staff, informatic managers, patients and all stakeholder organisations to continuously improve its services to be “fit for purpose”.

Originality/value

This case study reports the innovative collaborative work between a Medical Oncologist, an NHS Trust Informatics manager and a QI academic facilitator. The Health Foundation and Kings Fund have identified the continued challenges presented to the NHS in the transformation of its services, with the Health Foundation (2011) reporting the need for more collaborative working between clinicians and non-clinicians to drive improvement. This model of collaboration creates a new way of working to drive improvement initiatives and sets out a rationale to develop this model further to involve patients. However, this will call for a new way of working for all.

Details

Leadership in Health Services, vol. 33 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1879

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Article
Publication date: 22 November 2010

Hen‐I Yang, Chao Chen, Bessam Abdulrazak and Sumi Helal

A decade and a half after the debut of pervasive computing, a large number of prototypes, applications, and interaction interfaces have emerged. However, there is a lack…

Abstract

Purpose

A decade and a half after the debut of pervasive computing, a large number of prototypes, applications, and interaction interfaces have emerged. However, there is a lack of consensus about the best approaches to create such systems or how to evaluate them. To address these issues, this paper aims to develop a performance evaluation framework for pervasive computing systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the authors' experience in the Gator Tech Smart House – an assistive environment for the elderly, they established a reference scenario that was used to guide the analysis of the large number of systems they studied. An extensive survey of the literature was conducted, and through a thorough analysis, the authors derived and arrived at a broad taxonomy that could form a basic framework for evaluating existing and future pervasive computing systems.

Findings

A taxonomy of pervasive systems is instrumental to their successful evaluation and assessment. The process of creating such taxonomy is cumbersome, and as pervasive systems evolve with new technological advances, such taxonomy is bound to change by way of refinement or extension. This paper found that a taxonomy for something so broad as pervasive systems is very complex. It overcomes the complexity by focusing the classifications on key aspects of pervasive systems, decided purely empirically and based on the authors own experience in a real‐life, large‐scale pervasive system project.

Originality/value

There are currently no methods or frameworks for comparing, classifying, or evaluating pervasive systems. The paper establishes a taxonomy – a first step toward a larger evaluation methodology. It also provides a wealth of information, derived from a survey of a broad collection of pervasive systems.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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