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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Chris Brickell

Many scholarly disciplines are currently engaged in a turn to affect, paying close attention to emotion, feeling and sensation. The purpose of this paper is to locate…

Abstract

Purpose

Many scholarly disciplines are currently engaged in a turn to affect, paying close attention to emotion, feeling and sensation. The purpose of this paper is to locate affect in relation to masculinity, time and space.

Design/methodology/approach

It suggests that historically, in a range of settings, men have been connected to one another and to women, and these affective linkages tells much about the relational quality and texture of historically experienced masculinities.

Findings

Spatial settings, in turn, facilitate, hinder and modify expressions and experiences of affect and social connectedness. This paper will bring space and time into conversation with affect, using two examples from late nineteenth-century New Zealand.

Originality/value

If masculinities scholars often focus on what divides men from women and men from each other, the paper might think about how affect connects people.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Book part
Publication date: 23 October 2008

Phillip Vannini

Both the history and the historiography of SI show that multiple “different definitions and boundaries” have been applied to the subject of study (Atkinson & Housley

Abstract

Both the history and the historiography of SI show that multiple “different definitions and boundaries” have been applied to the subject of study (Atkinson & Housley, 2003, p. vii). Yet, despite the commonly agreed-upon understanding of SI's heterogeneity, in practice the institutional and disciplinary core of SI unmistakeably resides in its American heartland. For instance, Reynolds and Herman-Kinney (2003a, 2003b, p. ix) preface their fine Handbook of Symbolic Interactionism by aiming at making it “a fine addition to the sociological literature” (my emphasis). Maines (2001, 2003) himself – the most visible critic of the dissolution of SI – focuses on the growing invisibility of interactionism across American sociological theory and research while Fine (1993) and Sandstrom and Fine (2003, p. 1041) find that the “glorious triumph” of SI is due to its successes in “social psychology, medical sociology, deviance, social problems, collective behavior, cultural studies, media studies, the sociology of emotions, the sociology of art, environmental sociology, race relations, social organization, social movements, and political sociology” – hardly an interdisciplinary outlook.

Details

Studies in Symbolic Interaction
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-127-5

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Dr Ian Davis

Abstract

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1974

ROBERT G. OWENS

Intensifying efforts to utilize behavioral science concepts and knowledge in administrative research and practice in education during the past quarter‐century have…

Abstract

Intensifying efforts to utilize behavioral science concepts and knowledge in administrative research and practice in education during the past quarter‐century have produced an impressive body of literature, largely taxonomic in nature. Much of this literature involves system theory and attempts to identify and classify the various processes by which planned change may be controlled and directed. It thus gives rise to the concept of coherent change strategies and tactics: a concept useful to both the student of organizational change and the administrative practitioner. The author describes four major attempts to identify and classify strategies of organizational change and the tactice that “go with them. In general, these strategies address the problem of how to change organizations, but it is also necessary to know what to change. Leavitt has identified and described four crucial organizational variables which are amenable to administrative control and manipulation: (1) task, (2) structure, (3) people, and (4) technology. These variables are dynamically interrelated but are helpful to the researcher and the administrator in designing and monitoring systemic approaches to organizational change utilizing any strategy which may have been selected.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Martin Kesselman

This conference report is the first in a series of reviews of non-library conferences with implications for technology in libraries. These reports will appear under the…

Abstract

Purpose

This conference report is the first in a series of reviews of non-library conferences with implications for technology in libraries. These reports will appear under the umbrella title, “On the Horizon”. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper takes the form of a conference report.

Findings

These reports demonstrate the importance of learning about these technologies and trends and possible implications for libraries, not only for possible library applications but also to be aware of new technologies that are being used by library user communities.

Originality/value

This is the first time a library journal has reviewed conferences aimed at other groups of users but demonstrates the value of learning what is going on in other disciplines and environments where technologies are emerging at a rapid pace.

Details

Library Hi Tech News, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0741-9058

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 May 2007

Abstract

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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