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Article

Ahmadullah Hilali, Chotchai Charoenngam and Ankita Barman

For construction and management, the existing codes of practice of international organizations such as US Army Corps of Engineers, the Asian Development Bank, the World…

Abstract

Purpose

For construction and management, the existing codes of practice of international organizations such as US Army Corps of Engineers, the Asian Development Bank, the World Bank, the United Nations Office for Project Services, etc., often prove ineffective when applied in post-war countries like Afghanistan. Domestic contractors faced maximum challenges in contractual scope management, which was implemented by such organizations based on their existing codes of practice. The purpose of this paper is to understand these barriers in scope management as faced by the domestic contractors of Afghanistan.

Design/methodology/approach

The research employs a mixed methodology to cater to its objectives. Face-to-face structured interviews of 14 industry experts and extensive literature review were conducted to identify unique barriers pertaining to Afghanistan construction industry. Further, quantitative assessment of these barriers through the statistical tools of “mean score ranking,” “Kendall’s test” and “independent sample t-test” was carried out to understand the severity of the barriers.

Findings

In total, 39 unique barriers were identified under the groups of “scope formulation,” “scope completeness,” “scope pricing,” “scope implementation” and “scope change control.” The consequential impacts of these barriers and their existence at different stages of the project were illustrated. The most severe barriers were identified as the “inadequacy of site investigation reports” and the “unavailability of resources in local markets.”

Originality/value

The understanding of the challenges faced by local stakeholders, as highlighted by this study, can be utilized by these international organizations in their strategy and planning to ensure successful projects while also propagating the adoption of sustainable construction practices.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 26 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Kittipong Suweero, Wutthipong Moungnoi and Chotchai Charoenngam

Building operation and maintenance (BOM) services are important activities for highly competitive businesses. In addition, outsourcing decision factors are key to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Building operation and maintenance (BOM) services are important activities for highly competitive businesses. In addition, outsourcing decision factors are key to the effectiveness of BOM. Hence, the purpose of this paper is to identify and prioritize the decision factors that affect outsourcing decision factors for BOM services, to elicit the different perceptions of each managerial group (shopping centers, hotels, and hospitals), and to categorize the important outsourced BOM decision factors.

Design/methodology/approach

On the basis of the literature review, the authors observed that there are 56 outsourcing decision factors in six groups. The survey included 105 of the largest and most competitive companies in Bangkok, Thailand. The statistical methods applied were the relative importance index (RII), t-test, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and factor analysis (FA).

Findings

The findings show that the three participant groups are different in some respects, as shown by their RII values. After ranking the RII values, the top 15 factors for each participant group were used to compare the participant groups using the t-test and one-way ANOVA, which confirmed their respective similarities and differences. Through an FA, the top reasons that each business outsourced BOM services were grouped into major categories.

Originality/value

The results of this research will not only facilitate an understanding of the related decision factors used by each particular business in the commercial sector but will also assist outsourcing companies in identifying and improving support services for businesses.

Details

Property Management, vol. 35 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article

CHOTCHAI CHAROENNGAM and EKNARIN SRIPRASERT

The most important function that facilitates construction organizations to accomplish profit maximization is cost control. However, the absence of a well‐established cost…

Abstract

The most important function that facilitates construction organizations to accomplish profit maximization is cost control. However, the absence of a well‐established cost control system has caused failures to many Thai contractors especially during the current economic recession period. To comprehensively understand cost control systems in practice, this study theoretically assessed effectiveness as well as the deficiencies of the ‘traditional’ systems vis‐à‐vis the ‘effective’ systems. In addition, by contrasting what are found in ‘effective’ systems but not found in ‘traditional’ systems, critical attributes most contributing to the systems' successfulness were identified so that the improvement steps can be suitably prioritized. The validated findings indicated remarkable contrasts between ‘traditional’ and ‘effective’ systems. Two critical aspects, including advancement of cost control framework and systematic participation of site personnel in cost control, were found to be the major differences. Interestingly, similar conditions were encountered in various countries such as Greece, Pakistan and Australia; hence suggestions from this study could be internationally useful.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 8 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Damrong Chantawit, Bonaventura H.W. Hadikusumo, Chotchai Charoenngam and Steve Rowlinson

Safety planning in construction project management is separated from other planning functions, such as scheduling. This separation creates difficulties for safety…

Abstract

Safety planning in construction project management is separated from other planning functions, such as scheduling. This separation creates difficulties for safety engineers to analyse what, when, why and where safety measures are needed for preventing accidents. Another problem occurs due to the conventional practice of representing project designs using two‐dimensional (2D) drawings. In this practice, an engineer has to convert the 2D drawings into three‐dimensional (3D) mental pictures which is a tedious task. Since this conversion is already difficult, combining these 2D drawings with safety plans increases the difficulty. In order to address the problems, 4DCAD‐Safety is proposed. This paper discusses the design and development of 4DCAD‐Safety application and testing its usefulness in terms of assisting users in analysing what, when, where and why safety measures are needed.

Details

Construction Innovation, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-4175

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Article

Wasan Teerajetgul and Chotchai Charoenngam

This research is aimed at examining the relationships between knowledge factors and the knowledge creation process in construction projects, paying particular attention to…

Abstract

Purpose

This research is aimed at examining the relationships between knowledge factors and the knowledge creation process in construction projects, paying particular attention to on‐site work.

Design/methodology/approach

The design of this research is cross‐sectional and uses a blended methodological approach of both quantitative and qualitative methods. The research model includes the following variables; six knowledge factors: vision of leadership, trust, collaboration, incentives, information technology (IT) support, and individual competencies; and four knowledge creation processes: socialization, externalization, combination, and internalization. Survey data from 70 construction projects in Thai construction firms, obtained by means of a questionnaire developed by the researcher, were collated and analyzed. As a means of testing the model, regression analysis techniques were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Consistent with previous empirical evidence, three knowledge factors affected the knowledge creation process: incentives, IT, and individual competencies. It was noted that these factors overlay the knowledge creation process at all execution stages of on‐site construction.

Originality/value

This research is expected to contribute to a better understanding of important knowledge factors and knowledge management research in Thai construction that is still at an infancy stage. In order to build a knowledge creative culture, construction project executives need to support and maximize the value of human assets (individual competencies). Furthermore, facilitating IT‐supported knowledge management in construction projects needs to be considered and emphasized needs to be placed on productive work and gain a competitive advantage.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 13 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article

Hassan Fazliani and Chotchai Charoenngam

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the factors affecting the claim negotiations in Iranian oil and gas construction projects. The findings of this paper give…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to investigate the factors affecting the claim negotiations in Iranian oil and gas construction projects. The findings of this paper give better understanding of claim negotiations in Iranian oil and gas projects.

Design/methodology/approach

The research methodology for this study involved the use of Delphi technique, conducted with non-Iranian stakeholders being involved in Iranian oil and gas construction projects more than five years and determined the major factors, affecting claims negotiations. Subsequently, factors’ weightings were derived using analytic hierarchy process (AHP).

Findings

In total, 13 affecting factors identified in three categories of: external, cultural and personal behavioral. Finally, the weights of factors were identified.

Research limitations/implications

This research was conducted in the context of Iranian oil and gas projects. This industry has high standards and its employees are well chosen and have frequent in job training. All these affect the organization, working and people’s culture and behavior compared to other sectors of construction business. Therefore, the results of this research are specific to the oil and gas industry.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper can be considered as a practical guide for dealing with Iranian counterparts during claims negotiations to ensure amicable settlement. Also, it is useful for Iranian stakeholders to have better understanding of concerns of non-Iranian stakeholders.

Originality/value

The paper is the original work of the authors, and to the best of the authors’ knowledge, this paper has for the first time introduced the factors affecting claims negotiations. The findings of this paper provide useful insight into effective claims negotiations of Iranian oil and gas projects.

Details

International Journal of Energy Sector Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6220

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Article

Ahsen Maqsoom and Chotchai Charoenngam

This paper aims to study the impact of a firm’s size and international experience on its internationalization because it remains an under-researched area. Using an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to study the impact of a firm’s size and international experience on its internationalization because it remains an under-researched area. Using an integrated theoretical approach, this study examines the motives and (firm-specific and home country-specific) competitive assets, that enable the internationalization of Pakistan-based construction contracting firms (CCFs) having varied sizes and international experiences.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected through a postal questionnaire survey. A comparative analysis of these data was undertaken for firms of varied sizes and international experiences.

Findings

Findings show that firms of varied sizes did not concur over several firm-specific and home country-specific competitive assets, whereas firms of varied international experiences were in disagreement over fewer motives and home country-specific competitive assets. Small CCFs need to overcome weakness in their firm-specific competitive assets, especially international reputation and internationally experienced management. Government and home country support are needed to promote internationalization of emerging economies’ CCFs, especially younger and smaller ones that are more vulnerable due to an unstable business environment and lack of opportunities in domestic markets.

Research limitations/implications

The firms included in this study represent only one service sector, i.e. the emerging economy scenario of Pakistan’s construction industry. Future research may be conducted with a deeper analysis of the differences between emerging and developed economies’ CCFs as well as other service sectors.

Originality/value

The study will be helpful to those CCFs from emerging economies which are considering whether or not to internationalize and, to the regulatory bodies helping create a level playing field to nurture the internationalization process for their CCFs.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

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Article

Chotchai Charoenngam, Stephen O. Ogunlana, Kang Ning‐Fu and Prasanta K. Dey

In an exploding and fluctuating construction market, managers are facing a challenge, which is how to manage business on a wider scale and to utilize modern developments…

Abstract

In an exploding and fluctuating construction market, managers are facing a challenge, which is how to manage business on a wider scale and to utilize modern developments in information technology to promote productivity. The extraordinary development of telecommunications and computer technology makes it possible for people to plan, lead, control, organize and manage projects from a distance without the need to be on site on a daily basis. A modern management known as distance management (DM) or remote management is emerging. Physical distance no longer determines the boundary of management since managers can now operate projects through virtual teams that organize manpower, material and production without face‐to‐face communication. What organization prototype could overcome psychological and physical barriers to reengineer a successful project through information technology? What criteria distinguishes the adapted way of communication of individual activities in a teamwork and assist the integration of an efficient and effective communication between face‐to‐face and a physical distance? The entire methodology has been explained through a case application on refuse incineration plant projects in Taiwan.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 10 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

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Article

Preenithi Aksorn and Chotchai Charoenngam

– This paper aims to identify the critical factors highly influencing sustainability of local infrastructure projects in the Thai community.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the critical factors highly influencing sustainability of local infrastructure projects in the Thai community.

Design/methodology/approach

Both qualitative and the quantitative analyses were used when needed to follow the right procedure. Together, the panels of experts, selected from the related fields, were always prompt to cooperate with the strategies upon request. At the early stage, thoroughly fresh and in-depth information, theoretical and practical, in local infrastructure sustainability development, was gathered through literature review, a semi-structure interview and a focussed group meeting. For the pilot project, all crucial attributes were assigned to items of a questionnaire by a representative sample, Huai Hong Khrai Royal Development Study Centre, one of the most important sources in community development in Thailand. Afterward, the improved questionnaires were surveyed for exact data by all target respondents: local infrastructure project managers/representatives plus the working staff. These accumulated data were analysed by SPSS and finally produced the expected outcome.

Findings

They are categorised into 25 factors of 6 dimensions: management and administration, information and knowledge, policy and plan, environmental and natural resources, facility and infrastructure and finance and budget.

Originality/value

With regard to a valid analysis reference, the study outcome can be applied to be the deciding factor in choosing the proper local development projects or the model measuring the sustainability level of community projects in a real-life context.

Details

Facilities, vol. 33 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article

Surangkana Trangkanont and Chotchai Charoenngam

The purpose of this paper is to identify the salient risks borne by private firms and to investigate their effective risk response strategies in public-private partnership…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the salient risks borne by private firms and to investigate their effective risk response strategies in public-private partnership (PPP) low-cost housing (LCH) projects in Thailand.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs grounded theory and case study methodologies to extensively analyze ten private firms’ risks and their strategic risk mitigation. As a result, the matrix of imperative risks’ root causes and the area of the project life cycle most exposed to their impacts were proposed. This included the framework of the risk response strategy application.

Findings

The private firm's risk mitigation strategies depended on the salient risks’ impact and the private firms’ predictability and controllability of the risk outcome. This included the private firm's participating objectives and core business, decision maker's risk attitude, risk perception, experience of risk, and risk assessment skill, and the project life cycle phase of risk occurrence.

Practical implications

Under the same characteristics of the immature PPP market in developing countries, the contractors’ effective risk management framework can be used as a guideline to complement the contractors’ decision making on risk response strategy selection and resource allocation in the PPP project life cycle.

Originality/value

Despite working under the familiar environment of construction risk and generous payment method in PPP-LCH projects, only few contractors were successful. The examination of risks borne and effectively responded by the private sector increases the likelihood of the project success.

Details

Property Management, vol. 32 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

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