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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2003

Debra Grace and Aron O’Cass

In Australia, the child care industry has experienced substantial growth since 1991 resulting in a proliferation of child care centres throughout the country, to the point…

Abstract

In Australia, the child care industry has experienced substantial growth since 1991 resulting in a proliferation of child care centres throughout the country, to the point where supply of child care places is now in excess of demand. As a result, child care marketers now compete within a turbulent environment where it is vital to satisfy and retain customers in order to survive. Seeks to increase our knowledge of child care services consumption behaviour, and assist the child care marketer to understand their consumers and the difficulties they face as they interact with a service that they do not experience first hand. A self‐administered survey instrument was developed and administered to a sample of child care service switchers. The results indicate significant findings within, and between choice, switching, and post‐switching dimensions. The exploration of decision‐making areas provides a number of practical implications not only for the child care marketer, but also for government policy makers, child care consumers, and service providers in general.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2017

Hsuan-Hsuan Ku, Chien-Chih Kuo and Wan-Ting Huang

This paper aims to investigate the effect of retailers’ consumer communications in prompting the choice of an in-stock alternative to an out-of-stock first-choice product.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effect of retailers’ consumer communications in prompting the choice of an in-stock alternative to an out-of-stock first-choice product.

Design/methodology/approach

Four between-subjects experiments assessed the extent to which the likelihood of a retail customer switching to a similarly-priced alternative when a first choice was out-of-stock was affected by messages concerning stockout status (Studies 1a and 1b). They further examined the interaction effects on participants’ preference of messages comparing the available versus unavailable options and stating stockout status (Study 2) and those giving information on the reasons for the stockout and on its status (Study 3).

Findings

Participants maintained their original preference for an out-of-stock product unless an external restriction on choice prompted them to forsake it or they perceived a strong reason to opt for an in-stock alternative. There was a greater tendency to switch if the alternative offered a potential “gain” or the reasons given for a stockout were irrelevant to product performance, whether the participant was expecting imminent re-stocking. Switching was triggered when the available alternative was directly comparable to the original or the retailer’s explanation related to an attribute judged trivial, but only if short supply was expected to continue.

Originality/value

The studies add to current understanding of how shoppers respond to unavailability of a first-choice product by examining the effect on switching behavior of messages about the stockout situation that are communicated deliberately or inadvertently by retailers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 51 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Book part
Publication date: 13 May 2015

Annika Busch-Geertsema and Martin Lanzendorf

Theoretical assumptions for explaining travel behaviour changes are frequently limited to disciplinary boundaries. By combining the occurrence of key events with…

Abstract

Purpose

Theoretical assumptions for explaining travel behaviour changes are frequently limited to disciplinary boundaries. By combining the occurrence of key events with attitudinal dimensions in the ROA model and, furthermore, drawing on the model of cognitive dissonance, an integrated theoretical framework is presented.

Methodology/approach

We review several streams of research in different fields of travel behaviour research and develop a theoretical framework for guiding future empirical work on travel behaviour research.

Findings

The theoretical framework proposes that due to a key event a window of opportunity opens for behavioural change and adaptation processes of attitudes and behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Further empirical research will have to show the validity and usefulness of the theoretical framework developed. A panel data analysis is proposed with attitudinal variables before and after a certain key event.

Details

Sustainable Urban Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-615-7

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Book part
Publication date: 8 May 2003

Nobuhiro Uno, Yasunori Iida, Seiichiro Kawaratani and Masumi Suganuma

This study was performed to examine the relationship between dynamic traffic information and driver's route choice behavior when non-recurrent events cause traffic jams…

Abstract

This study was performed to examine the relationship between dynamic traffic information and driver's route choice behavior when non-recurrent events cause traffic jams. To enhance the effectiveness and applicability of the information system as a traffic control measure, it is important to investigate the influence of the software aspects of a dynamic traffic information system; these software aspects include information content and the timing of information delivery. This study was undertaken to investigate whether providing drivers with dynamic traffic information might relieve traffic jams and improve travel time reliability. A questionnaire survey was conducted to obtain data regarding the respondents' attitudes to detours and their stated preference (SP) of route choice behavior. These data are used to analyze the characteristics of drivers who show negative and positive attitudes to detours, including driver information usage and knowledge about the alternative routes. Also, this study analyzes the relation between the way to provide drivers with information and driver's decision-making on route using the SP data. Especially, the analytical attentions are paid to the influences of both timing and contents of information provided upon the respondent' route choices.

Details

The Network Reliability of Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-044109-2

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Article
Publication date: 27 April 2020

Rasha H.A. Mostafa and Mohamed Mahmoud Ibrahim

This paper aims to investigate the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations represented in religious motivation and customer equity (CE) drivers, respectively, and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic motivations represented in religious motivation and customer equity (CE) drivers, respectively, and switching costs (SCs), on customer’s retention to conventional banks and their switching intention (SI) to Islamic ones in the context of the Egyptian banking sector.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the literature, a theoretical model is proposed and examined using structural equation modeling (AMOS) 24. Data were obtained using an intercept sample of 273 conventional bank customers in two major cities in Egypt, namely, Cairo and Giza.

Findings

The results supported the positive effect of CE and SCs on customer retention (CR) to conventional banks. Value equity has direct positive effect on CR. In addition, SC significantly mediated the relationship between relationship equity (RE) and service encounter employee’s equity (SEEE) and CR. Finally, religious motivations positively and significantly influence customers SI to Islamic banks.

Practical implications

CE, including all its drivers, namely, value, brand, relationship and SEEE, are the best force of CR in the Egyptian banking sector. The mediating role of SC in the relation between RE and SEEE and CR is perceived as a barrier to switch, instead of reflecting real desire from customers to stay tuned to their conventional banks. In addition, religious motivation should be considered while planning banking services because of its significant direct effect on customers SI from conventional banks to Islamic ones. Finally, both utilitarian extrinsic motivation and hedonic intrinsic ones are influencing customer’s retention and SI, respectively.

Originality/value

This paper develops and adds a fourth driver to previously examined and validated CE drivers, namely, SEEE. Further, it provides empirical analysis to the effect of religious motivation and CE drivers on SCs, CR and SI in a developing and Islamic dominating context, namely, Egypt. Moreover, it introduces a framework that could be examined and validated in other Islamic contexts to further comprehend bank customers' switching behavior. Yet, the current research focused on the Egyptian banking sector only, where the individual customers represent the sampling unit.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 11 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

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Book part
Publication date: 11 May 2012

Candice Howarth and Tim Ryley

Purpose – To provide a behavioural perspective on the relationship between transport and climate change.Methodology/approach – The factors influencing travel behaviour and…

Abstract

Purpose – To provide a behavioural perspective on the relationship between transport and climate change.

Methodology/approach – The factors influencing travel behaviour and the elements critical to behaviour formation are reviewed. The importance of behaviour change measures to reduce the impact of transport on climate change, and the application of behaviour change measures to increase the sustainability of transport, are examined.

Findings – There have been a range of travel behaviour measures implemented, such as individualised marketing programmes and travel plans, which have demonstrated some behavioural change impacts, in turn affecting climate change emissions, although they tend to be localised and small-scale.

Social implications – There is a real challenge to encourage individuals within society to exhibit more sustainable travel behaviour.

Originality/value – A range of behavioural issues still need to be resolved in terms of the relationship between transport and climate change, including a need to influence attitudes, to bridge the gaps between attitudes and both behaviour and intention, to make an impact at points of transition for individuals, to use cognitive dissonance as a way of harnessing social norms, and to understand more fully social pressure and group influence.

Details

Transport and Climate Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78052-440-5

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Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Vishal Vyas and Sonika Raitani

The price war and intense competition in Indian banking industry have exposed banks to one of the major threat of switching. Consumers are now more price and service…

Abstract

Purpose

The price war and intense competition in Indian banking industry have exposed banks to one of the major threat of switching. Consumers are now more price and service conscious in their financial services purchasing behaviour. They are more prone to change their banking behaviour as banking products and services are nearly identical in nature. The purpose of this paper is to provide an insight of the drivers that lead a customer switch from one service provider to another in Indian banking industry using exploratory design.

Design/methodology/approach

The impacts of the influencing factors have been studied and tested empirically using exploratory factor analysis. Quantitative data have been collected by means of questionnaire employed from Clemes et al. and administered to 296 banking customers of Rajasthan utilizing convenience sampling.

Findings

Results reported that price, reputation, responses to service failure, customer satisfaction, service quality, service products, competition, customer commitment and involuntary switching have their significant effect on customers’ switching behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

The findings of present study can be used by the Indian banks for their product and service designing strategies, marketing strategies and customer services practices in order to reduce customer switching. It would help them in improving their service operations and also in increasing customer satisfaction and loyalty by understanding the banking behaviour of their customers.

Originality/value

The originality lies in the fact that this study is one of few which have focused on the drivers leading to the switching intentions of Indian banking customers.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Venkata Yanamandram and Lesley White

To investigate the determinants of behavioural brand loyalty amongst dissatisfied customers in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the determinants of behavioural brand loyalty amongst dissatisfied customers in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative study was conducted, with 28 personal interviews undertaken with managers who are involved in the choice of service providers. The respondents belonged to 24 organisations located in Australia. Template analysis and eyeballing were techniques used to analyse the data collected.

Findings

Assessment of the reasons why dissatisfied customers stayed with the service providers resulted in six categories. The categories were found to be, in order of decreasing frequency, impact of alternative providers, switching costs (18), others (17), inertia (14), investment in relationships (13), and service recovery (13). The results not only confirmed factors found in the literature, but also uncovered 11 other factors.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size, whilst appropriate for qualitative research, should be considered adequate only for exploratory analysis and a further quantitative study is needed to validate the study.

Practical implications

This study is important for those firms who have many prospective switchers because it is important to understand why these customers stay, and to what extent such firms can discourage such customers from leaving in both positive and negative ways. For those service firms that are attempting to attract these prospective switchers, an understanding of why they do not switch is important, as it will enable them to develop strategies to overcome these switching barriers and gain market share.

Originality/value

This research is the first study to investigate in a single model a range of barriers to switching in a B2B services context. The results that confirmed categories found in the literature also discovered 11 other factors not evident in the extant literature.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Article
Publication date: 8 June 2012

Gurjeet Kaur, R.D. Sharma and Neha Mahajan

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent of customer switching and the reasons that underlie customer‐switching intentions. The paper aims to focus on the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the extent of customer switching and the reasons that underlie customer‐switching intentions. The paper aims to focus on the various factors on account of which a customer may or may not switch a particular bank.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 800 bank customers were selected randomly from a total population of 71,600 and were contacted personally to gather the requisite data.

Findings

The paper finds that the model reveals significant effect of quality, satisfaction and trust on predicting switching barriers. Of these relationships, satisfaction emerged as the strongest factor which influences switching barriers.

Research limitations/implications

The study is limited to Indian banks; a larger empirical study would be useful to replicate the results in the banking as well as other services.

Practical implications

In order to ensure loyalty among bank customers, increased value addition in the banking services and wide‐ranging relationships with customers can make the switching process more complex.

Originality/value

The preliminary work in this paper demonstrates the impact of various relationship marketing factors, namely, service quality, customer value, satisfaction, trust, commitment, loyalty, switching costs and barriers on customers' switching intentions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

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Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

Lesley White and Venkata Yanamandram

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a theoretical framework of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to continue purchasing from their existing service provider in the business‐to‐business (B2B) services sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This review paper synthesises the findings from previous studies on switching barriers, and relationship variables, dependence, and calculative commitment.

Findings

Five major factors deter customers from switching to an alternative service provider: switching costs; interpersonal relationships; the attractiveness of alternatives; service recovery; and inertia. These factors are mediated by dependence and calculative commitment.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive study of the factors that potentially influence dissatisfied customers to remain behaviourally loyal to a service provider in the B2B services sector. This important study has significance for marketers in developing strategies for customer retention and service recovery.

Details

Managing Service Quality: An International Journal, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-4529

Keywords

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