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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2019

Feng Zhang, Liqun Wei, Hongyi Sun and Lo Choi Tung

Although entrepreneurial learning is widely believed as an important factor in shaping one’s entrepreneurial intention, research finds little consistent results on the…

Abstract

Purpose

Although entrepreneurial learning is widely believed as an important factor in shaping one’s entrepreneurial intention, research finds little consistent results on the direct effect of entrepreneurial learning on one’s entrepreneurial intention. To solve the conflicted effects of entrepreneurial learning, the purpose of this paper is to explore how entrepreneurial learning may impact individual entrepreneurial intention.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on the theory of planned behavior (TPB), the authors proposed and tested on a three mediating effect model, in which entrepreneurial learning is associated with entrepreneurial intention through attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control toward entrepreneurship. Moreover, the moderating role of prior exposure to entrepreneurship was proposed and tested. Based on a sample of 200 university students who have taken entrepreneurial courses in Hong Kong, the hierarchical regressions and moderated mediation tests were used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The authors find that the positive relationship between entrepreneurial learning and entrepreneurial intention is significantly mediated by attitude, subjective norm and perceived behavioral control toward entrepreneurship; and the mediating effects of entrepreneurial learning on entrepreneurial intention via attitudes and perceived behavioral control respectively, is moderated by exposure to entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

Contributing to the literature of entrepreneurship education, this study identifies individuals who exposed to the same entrepreneurship education may perform differently in entrepreneurial learning. The findings also help us to better understand the mechanism through which and under which context one’s entrepreneurial learning may enhance his/her entrepreneurial intention.

Details

Chinese Management Studies, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-614X

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Article
Publication date: 21 August 2017

Hongyi Sun, Choi Tung Lo, Bo Liang and Yuen Ling Belle Wong

Theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used to study the impact of entrepreneurial education (EE) on entrepreneurial intention (EI) for more than 20 years, yet an…

Abstract

Purpose

Theory of planned behavior (TPB) has been used to study the impact of entrepreneurial education (EE) on entrepreneurial intention (EI) for more than 20 years, yet an intensive literature review reveals that there are gaps in both the conceptual models and the research methods. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of EE on EI with a view to address the gaps in previous research.

Design/methodology/approach

This research proposes a conceptual model that links the entire antecedent variables of TPB and the elaborated four components of entrepreneurship education (Why, What, How, and Who). The model is tested by a structural equation modeling with the empirical data from 200 engineering students from three universities in Hong Kong.

Findings

The empirical test reveals that the four components of entrepreneurial education do influence attitude, social norm, self-efficacy, and EI, correspondingly. Additionally, it also reveals that the four EE components and the three TPB antecedent variables are also interrelated with each other.

Originality/value

This study bridges specific education components and EI, providing significant insight into how the key components influence the entrepreneurial attitudes and intentions of students. It fills the gap in the knowledge required for fostering EI through entrepreneurship education. It not only answers the question on whether EE influences EI but also on how to nurture the intention by designing a relevant EE course.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 55 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2004

William H.K. Lam and Hong K. Lo

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-615-83253-8

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 November 2020

Faruk Seyitoğlu and Stanislav Ivanov

The purpose of this study is to investigate the robotic restaurant experience of travellers around the world and understand the components of robotic restaurant experience.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the robotic restaurant experience of travellers around the world and understand the components of robotic restaurant experience.

Design/methodology/approach

Travellers who had experienced a robotic restaurant were purposefully selected as a sample group for the study. As the robotic restaurants are limited around the world, multiple case study method has been chosen to gather richer data. A user-generated content technique which is a form of qualitative case study method has been benefited to gather data from travellers’ reviews.

Findings

The results reveal a model of components of robotic restaurant experience that include six main themes: attraction for kids, robotic system, memorable experience, ambience related attributes, food related attributes (economic value and gastronomic aspects) and deficiencies (in robotic system, in ambience related attributes and in food related attributes).

Originality/value

This paper is one of the first to investigate the robotic restaurant experience of travellers around the world. Moreover, it contributes to the research on restaurant experience and offers a model of components of the robotic restaurant experience.

Details

Journal of Tourism Futures, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-5911

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Rebecca Abraham

Compares the values underlying the behaviour of a sample of 87 US, 56 Jamaican, 42 Bahamian, 106 Colombian, and 12 Israeli managers and professional staff. Refers to…

Abstract

Compares the values underlying the behaviour of a sample of 87 US, 56 Jamaican, 42 Bahamian, 106 Colombian, and 12 Israeli managers and professional staff. Refers to literature defining individualism and collectivism, uncertainty avoidance, power distance, and masculinity/femininity; as well as literature establishing these values as instrumental or terminal. Hypothesizes that each country‘s respondents will record different instrumental values, with the US respondents being ambitious, independent, intellectual and logical (vertically individualist); the Colombian, Jamaican and Bahamians being ambitious, cheerful, forgiving, helpful, loving, obedient and polite; and the Israelis also valuing the latter six qualities. Describes the methodology used and data analysis. Indicates expected results from the findings, other than the Jamaicans and Bahamians were found to value ambition and independence more highly than hypothesized, and the Israelis valued love and obedience but not cheerfulness and forgiveness. Discusses the implications of the findings in the light of the high failure rate of expatriate assignments.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2009

Kwoting Fang, Yu‐Chih Lin and Tung‐Lin Chuang

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, this study seeks to provide a framework for, and endeavor to gain, an in‐depth understanding of the decision‐making process…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is threefold. First, this study seeks to provide a framework for, and endeavor to gain, an in‐depth understanding of the decision‐making process in relation to playing or not playing massively multiplayer online role‐playing games (MMORPGs) by using qualitative data from interviewing both players and non‐players. Second, it seeks to establish a better measure and model using an ethnographic decision tree model that describes the decision‐making process of internet users. Finally, for cross‐validity purposes, it aims to verify the model using quantitative data from face‐to‐face surveys of players/non‐players in an online gaming context.

Design/methodology/approach

A two‐phase mixed method is adopted here. During the first phase, the decision tree development phase, to capture the concerns of internet users who are facing the choice of playing MMORPGs or not, qualitative‐based procedures are used to identify decision factors and organize them into a decision tree for better understanding a research problem. In the second phase, the decision tree verification phase, to test the predictive capability of the composite model, a quantitative‐based survey instrument, which represents the decision criteria identified in the first phase, is adopted for data collection and analysis.

Findings

The results revealed that 14 criteria, formulated as a decision tree, were identified in the model‐building phase. In the model‐testing phase, 137 decision processes were successfully predicted and 17 predictive pathways led to a decision against the factual, giving a predictive rate of 89 per cent.

Originality/value

The study bridges the gap between the research in online games and in decision making. At the theoretical level, the decision tree model can provide a more comprehensive and in‐depth explanation of the online games‐playing phenomenon. In practice, marketers can easily become aware of the user considerations and identify exactly what needs to be done to fulfil users' criteria for playing MMORPGs. And, from a methodological standpoint, a mixed method can help researchers improve techniques used in study for building more predictive models.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 47 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Rebecca Abraham

This study is an empirical investigation of receptivity to expatriate assignment in culturally similar and dissimilar environments. The theoretical underpinnings of the…

Abstract

This study is an empirical investigation of receptivity to expatriate assignment in culturally similar and dissimilar environments. The theoretical underpinnings of the study emerge from a model of the expatriate adjustment process which views the determinants as anticipatory adjustment variables antecedent to actual adjustment. Vertical individualism, career distance and corporate career policy along with role clarity and economic development as moderators were found to significantly explain willingness to relocate to culturally similar environments. Economic development, corporate family policy and career distance were significant predictors of mobility to culturally dissimilar environments. The proposed model for culturally similar environments substantially improves explanatory power over an existing model. Implications of the study in conjunction with predictors from the domestic mobility and international adjustment literature are discussed.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Chung Fun Steven Hung

The purpose of this paper is to assess the intra-party conflicts in Hong Kong’s Democratic Party (DP) and their implications for broader democratic processes in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the intra-party conflicts in Hong Kong’s Democratic Party (DP) and their implications for broader democratic processes in the territory. It also examines some other thematic issues including: the party’s policy decision-making process, candidate selection, party membership and mergers, and their overall relevance for democratisation in Hong Kong.

Design/methodology/approach

The study gives a historical review of intra-party conflicts. The concept of factionalism is applied to better understand the DP in Hong Kong’s political space.

Findings

Hong Kong is unique and popular models of party conflicts are hardly applicable to the country. Intra-party conflict is an obvious, expected conflict because of differences in formation, leadership, manifestoes and ideologies. The present author tries to examine the case with a view to making a novel contribution.

Originality/value

The study of political factionalism is not uncommon in Hong Kong but this paper intends to study intra-party elite conflicts and self-democratisation of the Hong Kong DP as a case study which is seldom addressed. Consolidation is a possible scenario and its presence is evident when political elites increasingly demonstrate commitment towards creating a democratic regime and when they hold strong beliefs in democratic procedures and institutions as crucial to governing public life.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 12 October 2018

Abstract

Details

Quality Services and Experiences in Hospitality and Tourism
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-384-1

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