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Abstract

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Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 13 August 2021

Naveen Jain, Danilo Le Sante, Chockalingam Viswesvaran and Rakesh Belwal

The psychological contract breach (PCB) literature has documented the negative effects of PCB on employee job attitudes and the variables that moderate (accentuate or…

Abstract

Purpose

The psychological contract breach (PCB) literature has documented the negative effects of PCB on employee job attitudes and the variables that moderate (accentuate or mitigate) this relationship. Given that multiple variables together influence a subordinate’s PCB – job attitudes relationship, this paper aims to investigate a three-way interaction between corporate reputation, supervisor’s and subordinate’s PCBs on the job attitudes of the latter.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors collected a dyadic sample of 227 employees and their 79 supervisors from some of the well-known companies in Oman. The authors used SPSS (version 25) to examine the three-way interaction of focal employee PCB, supervisor PCB and corporate reputation on employee job attitudes.

Findings

The results indicated that depending on the perception of corporate reputation, the extent of the supervisor’s PCB perception has a differential influence on the employee PCB – job attitudes relationship.

Originality/value

By investigating the joint (sometimes conflicting) influences of multiple moderators which enhances the ecological validity, this paper makes an original and important contribution to the PCB literature.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Jessica Mesmer-Magnus, Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Jacob Joseph and Satish P. Deshpande

Emotional intelligence (EI) is thought to offer significant benefit to organizational productivity through enhanced employee performance and satisfaction, decreased…

Abstract

Emotional intelligence (EI) is thought to offer significant benefit to organizational productivity through enhanced employee performance and satisfaction, decreased burnout, and better teamwork. EI may also have implications for the incidence of counterproductive workplace behavior. Survey results suggest EI is a significant predictor of individuals’ ethicality and their perceptions of others’ ethicality. Further, EI explains incremental variance in perceptions of others’ ethics over and above that which is explained by individual ethicality. High EI employees may be more adept at interpreting the ethicality of others’ actions, which has positive implications for ethical decision-making. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Article
Publication date: 10 February 2012

Jessica Mesmer‐Magnus, David J. Glew and Chockalingam Viswesvaran

The benefits of humor for general well‐being have long been touted. Past empirical research has suggested that some of these benefits also exist in the work domain…

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13414

Abstract

Purpose

The benefits of humor for general well‐being have long been touted. Past empirical research has suggested that some of these benefits also exist in the work domain. However, there is little shared understanding as to the role of humor in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to address two main gaps in the humor literature. First, the authors summarize several challenges researchers face in defining and operationalizing humor, and offer an integrative conceptualization which may be used to consolidate and interpret seemingly disparate research streams. Second, meta‐analysis is used to explore the possibility that positive humor is associated with: employee health (e.g. burnout, health) and work‐related outcomes (e.g. performance, job satisfaction, withdrawal); with perceived supervisor/leader effectiveness (e.g. perceived leader performance, follower approval); and may mitigate the deleterious effects of workplace stress on employee burnout.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors examine the results of prior research using meta‐analysis (k=49, n=8,532) in order to explore humor's potential role in organizational and employee effectiveness.

Findings

Results suggest employee humor is associated with enhanced work performance, satisfaction, workgroup cohesion, health, and coping effectiveness, as well as decreased burnout, stress, and work withdrawal. Supervisor use of humor is associated with enhanced subordinate work performance, satisfaction, perception of supervisor performance, satisfaction with supervisor, and workgroup cohesion, as well as reduced work withdrawal.

Research limitations/implications

Profitable avenues for future research include: clarifying the humor construct and determining how current humor scales tap this construct; exploring the role of negative forms of humor, as they likely have different workplace effects; the role of humor by coworkers; a number of potential moderators of the humor relationships, including type of humor, job level and industry type; and personality correlates of humor use and appreciation.

Practical implications

The authors recommend caution be exercised when attempting to cultivate humor in the workplace, as this may raise legal concerns (e.g. derogatory or sexist humor), but efforts aimed at encouraging self‐directed/coping humor may have the potential to innocuously buffer negative effects of workplace stress.

Originality/value

Although psychologists have long recognized the value of humor for general well‐being, organizational scholars have devoted comparatively little research to exploring benefits of workplace humor. Results underscore benefits of humor for work outcomes, encourage future research, and offer managerial insights on the value of creating a workplace context supportive of positive forms of humor.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 27 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Chockalingam Viswesvaran, Satish P. Deshpande and Claudio Milman

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the…

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5467

Abstract

Surveys 200 Malaysian students at a US midwestern university to investigate attitudes towards corporate social responsibility. Refers to previous studies exploring the link between corporate social responsibility and financial performance but asserts that there is little empirical evidence on corporate social responsibility and employee attitudes – hence this study. Describes how the survey was carried out (a questionnaire measured on a four‐point Likert scale). Uses t‐tests to evaluate the data. Aims particularly to establish whether or not individuals who value corporate social responsibility exhibit less tolerance of 17 identified counter productive behaviours (such as using organizational services for personal use, padding expense accounts and pilfering organizational supplies). Finds support for the notion that individuals who value corporate social responsibility rate the 17 behaviours as more unethical than individuals who do not especially value corporate social responsibility. Indicates, therefore, that these (more ethical) individuals are less likely to indulge in counter productive behaviour. Recommends ways to back up and extend this research.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1998

Chockalingam Viswesvaran and Satish P. Deshpande

Investigates perceived ethical behaviour by surveying 150 Indian managers, recognizing that perceived ethicality of behaviour differs depending on an individual’s life…

Abstract

Investigates perceived ethical behaviour by surveying 150 Indian managers, recognizing that perceived ethicality of behaviour differs depending on an individual’s life experience and developed values. Hypothesizes that people over 40, women, and more highly educated people will interpret ethical business practice more stringently. Records the methodology used, including the demographic breakdown of the sample group. Uses Likert scales and t‐tests to assess the data. Finds significant gender, age and educational differences in perceived ethical behaviour. Recommends further research into the influence of other variables and wonders if national differences – this study was one of a very few that did not use Norther American samples – accounts for or affects ethical perceptions.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

I.M. Jawahar

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264

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 February 2017

I.M. “Jim” Jawahar

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378

Abstract

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Abstract

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

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1882

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Researchers have commented that “despite the enduring nature of humor, it has seldom been taken seriously by organizational scientists”. But successful businesses have been built on phrases like “have fun, make money”. Indeed, some use measures of humor within their selection systems and report impressive results. For instance, Southwest Airlines screens for a “light‐hearted attitude”, declaring that this leads to greater employee camaraderie and performance, as well as enhancing customer satisfaction. Humor has been part of every culture throughout history, with sayings along the lines of “laughter is the best medicine”. So can it make a difference to how well an organization works, or to how well individuals get on at work?

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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