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Article
Publication date: 16 March 2015

Ching-Hsun Chang

The purpose of this paper is to develop an original framework to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) plays a mediation role between green organizational culture…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an original framework to explore corporate social responsibility (CSR) plays a mediation role between green organizational culture and green product innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study divides CSR into proactive CSR and reactive CSR. This research employs an empirical study by means of the questionnaire survey method to verify the hypotheses and to explore its managerial implications in Taiwanese manufacturing companies. Structural equation modeling is applied to verify the research framework.

Findings

The empirical results verify that green organizational culture positively affects proactive CSR and green product innovation performance. This study shows that proactive CSR mediates the positive relationship between green organizational culture and green product innovation performance, but reactive CSR does not. Green organizational culture is a driving force for proactive CSR and green product innovation performance. Organizational members in Taiwanese companies are exposed to green organizational culture which influences CSR activities. Moreover, this study verifies that proactive CSR of large companies are significantly higher than those of small and medium enterprises (SMEs).

Research limitations/implications

There are three limitations of this study. First, this study verifies the hypotheses by means of questionnaire survey which only includes cross-sectional data. Second, this study utilize self-reported data may suffer the problems of common method variance. Third, this study applies a “five-point Likert scale” ranging from 1 to 5 to measure the constructs. Future research can apply a “seven-point Likert scale” to measure the constructs and compare with this study to test the significance of the variability of the data. There are two implications emerging from the study. First, proactive CSR has a positive effect on green product innovation performance, but reactive CSR does not. Second, green organizational culture is a driving force for proactive CSR and green product innovation performance.

Originality/value

This study summarizes the literature of CSR into a new managerial framework and highlights the importance of proactive CSR. Therefore, green organizational culture cannot only affect green product innovation performance directly, but also influence it indirectly via proactive CSR in the Taiwanese manufacturing industry. Taiwanese manufacturing companies can increase their green organizational culture and proactive CSR to enhance their green product innovation performance. This study also explores that proactive CSR of large companies are significantly higher than those of SME.

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Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Ching‐Hsun Chang and Yu‐Shan Chen

The authors aim to apply an “interpretive context – organizational action – outcome” framework to explore the positive effect of green organizational identity on green…

Abstract

Purpose

The authors aim to apply an “interpretive context – organizational action – outcome” framework to explore the positive effect of green organizational identity on green innovation performance. Besides, they would like to verify that both environmental commitment and environmental organizational legitimacy mediate between green organizational identity and green innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors utilize a hybrid research method that includes both questionnaire data and public data to test the hypotheses to satisfy the triangulation in methodology. In addition, structural equation modeling (SEM) is used to perform the empirical research.

Findings

The results show that green organizational identity would positively affect green innovation performance. Moreover, green organizational identity could positively influence green innovation performance indirectly via environmental commitment and environmental organizational legitimacy. Firms should increase their green organizational identity, environmental commitment, and environmental organizational legitimacy to enhance their green innovation performance. Furthermore, the authors find out that green organizational identity, environmental commitment, environmental organizational legitimacy, and green innovation performance of small and medium‐sized enterprises (SMEs) are lower than those of large enterprises in Taiwan.

Originality/value

The authors develop a research framework to explore the positive effect of green organizational identity on green innovation and explore the mediation effects of environmental commitment and environmental organizational legitimacy.

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Yu‐Shan Chen and Ching‐Hsun Chang

The purpose of this study is to develop an original framework to explore the influences of green perceived value and green perceived risk on green purchase intentions and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to develop an original framework to explore the influences of green perceived value and green perceived risk on green purchase intentions and to discuss the mediation role of green trust.

Design/methodology/approach

This study applies four original concepts – green perceived value, green perceived risk, green trust, and green purchase intentions – to develop an integral model to enhance green purchase intentions. In addition, this research employs an empirical study by means of the questionnaire survey method to verify the hypotheses and to explore its managerial implications. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to verify the research framework.

Findings

The empirical results show that green perceived value would positively affect green trust and green purchase intentions, while green perceived risk would negatively influence both of them. Furthermore, this study demonstrates that the relationships between green purchase intentions and their two antecedents – green perceived value and green perceived risk – are partially mediated by green trust. Hence, investing resources to increase green perceived value and to decrease green perceived risk is helpful to enhance green trust and green purchase intentions.

Originality/value

This study summarizes the literature on green marketing and relationship marketing into a new managerial framework of green purchase intentions. It utilizes four novel constructs – green perceived value, green perceived risk, green trust, and green purchase intentions – to develop an original research framework to enhance green purchase intentions. Although past research has highlighted the relevant issues about purchase intentions, none explores it about green management. Therefore, this paper develops the research framework of green purchase intentions to fill the research gap.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2013

Yu‐Shan Chen and Ching‐Hsun Chang

This study aims to combine the literature on green marketing and relationship marketing into a new managerial framework of green trust. In addition, this study seeks to…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to combine the literature on green marketing and relationship marketing into a new managerial framework of green trust. In addition, this study seeks to elaborate the relationships among green perceived quality, green perceived risk, green satisfaction, and green trust.

Design/methodology/approach

The research object of this paper focuses on Taiwan's consumers who have the purchase experience of information and electronics products. This study undertakes an empirical study by means of the questionnaire survey method. The questionnaires were randomly mailed to consumers who had the purchase experience of information and electronics products. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to test the research framework.

Findings

The empirical results indicate that green perceived quality would positively affect green satisfaction and green trust, whereas green perceived risk would negatively influence both of them. In addition, this study points out that the relationships between green trust and its two antecedents – green perceived quality and green perceived risk – are partially mediated by green satisfaction. Hence, investing resources in the increase of green perceived quality and the decrease of green perceived risk is useful to enhance green satisfaction and green trust.

Originality/value

Although previous research has explored the relevant issues about trust, none highlights trust about green or environmental issues from the perspectives of perceived quality and perceived risk. This study proposes a research framework, which can help companies enhance their green trust via its three determinants: green perceived quality, green perceived risk, and green satisfaction.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 51 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 February 2012

Ching‐Hsun Chang and Yu‐Shan Chen

This study aims to develop an original framework of green intellectual capital to explore the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on green…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop an original framework of green intellectual capital to explore the positive effect of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on green intellectual capital through the partial mediator ‐ environmental consciousness.

Design/methodology/approach

This study summarizes the concepts of CSR and green management to develop an integral framework to enhance green intellectual capital. Structural equation modeling (SEM) is applied to verify the research framework.

Findings

This study utilizes SEM to explore the influences of CSR and environmental consciousness on three types of green intellectual capital – green human capital, green structural capital, and green relationship capital. The empirical results of this study demonstrate that CSR and environmental consciousness have positive effects on three types of green intellectual capital. Besides, this study verifies that environmental consciousness is a partial mediator between CSR and three types of green intellectual capital. In addition, this study classifies the Taiwanese manufacturing companies into three groups – highly, medially, and lowly ethic companies. The results show that three types of green intellectual capital of highly ethic companies are the most, and those of medially ethic companies are the next, while those of lowly ethic companies are the least.

Originality/value

This study integrates the theories of CSR and green management to develop an integral conceptual model of green intellectual capital to explore its managerial implications and determinants.

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Article
Publication date: 17 May 2013

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

According to legend – and to the Johnny Cash song – Ireland has 40 shades of green. According to some marketers, businesses these days have to contemplate, if not 40, at least several shades of green when they consider their own environmental responsibility and the growing perception among their customers that “green is good”. As green products are more popular in the market, green marketing has become more prevalent as a consequence.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

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Article
Publication date: 23 March 2012

Yu‐Shan Chen, Ching‐Hsun Chang and Feng‐Shang Wu

The purpose of this paper is to explore the origins of the two types of green innovations: proactive and reactive green innovations.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the origins of the two types of green innovations: proactive and reactive green innovations.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to satisfy the essence of the triangulation in methodology, this study applies a hybrid research method which includes both qualitative and quantitative research to discuss the origins of green innovations based on the two following stages. First, the study uses inductive logic from the perspectives of case study research and grounded theory to build the research framework and selects AU Optronics Corp. (AUO), the worldwide top three manufacturer in the TFT‐LCD industry, as the research object. Second, the study utilizes a questionnaire survey method to test the research framework proposed in the first stage.

Findings

This study divides green innovations into two types: proactive and reactive green innovations, because their origins are different. The results show that both of the internal origins – environmental leadership, environmental culture, and environmental capability and the external origins – the environmental regulations and the environmentalism of investors and clients – can generate reactive green innovation. However, only the internal origins can facilitate proactive green innovation. This study suggests that companies should invest their resources in cultivating the internal origins rather than the external origins.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into what origins cause proactive and reactive green innovations by means of hybrid research method – qualitative and quantitative research – in Taiwan. This study builds up a theory about the origins of the two types of green innovations.

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Article
Publication date: 14 June 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Green issues are hot news today. Environmental awareness is an essential part of strategic thinking for companies large and small, at a time when investors and the public at large are ready to raise questions about how products are made, the materials used and the disposal of waste. Any organization with an international business also needs to be aware of and comply with a whole range of environmental regulations, including the Kyoto Protocol; the Montréal Convention; and EU directives on the use and disposal of hazardous materials. Sometimes compliance is a reluctant afterthought, but there are others who use green innovation as a key part of their strategy and a way to take the lead over their competitors.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to review the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoint practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Industrial pollution is widely blamed for many environmental problems. Awareness of such issues has risen dramatically over recent years. As a result, concern for the environment now occupies a prominent place in public consciousness. Most business organizations realize this and fully accept the need to conduct their affairs in a socially responsible manner. Environmental welfare is a major part of this obligation. Compliance is a must. But demand for green solutions also presents firms with a rich source of opportunity. Smart operators will be alert to this. Developing products that benefit rather than harm the environment can prove a highly lucrative exercise. An ability to create such products is not sufficient though. Companies need to get the message across too.

Practical implications

The paper provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 29 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 21 February 2018

Gema Albort-Morant, Antonio L. Leal-Rodríguez and Valentina De Marchi

This paper aims to explore in depth how internal and external knowledge-based drivers actually affect the firms’ green innovation performance. Subsequently, this study…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore in depth how internal and external knowledge-based drivers actually affect the firms’ green innovation performance. Subsequently, this study analyzes the relationships between absorptive capacity (internal knowledge-based driver), relationship learning (external knowledge-based driver) and green innovation performance.

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies on a sample of 112 firms belonging to the Spanish automotive components manufacturing sector (ACMS) and uses partial least squares path modeling to test the hypotheses proposed.

Findings

The empirical results show that both absorptive capacity and relationship learning exert a significant positive effect on the dependent variable and that relationship learning moderates the link between absorptive capacity and green innovation performance.

Research limitations/implications

This paper presents some limitations with respect to the particular sector (i.e. the ACMS) and geographical context (Spain). For this reason, researchers must be thoughtful while generalizing these results to distinct scenarios.

Practical implications

Managers should devote more time and resources to reinforce their absorptive capacity as an important strategic tool to generate new knowledge and hence foster green innovation performance in manufacturing industries.

Social implications

The paper shows the importance of encouraging decision-makers to cultivate and rely on relationship learning mechanisms with their main stakeholders and to acquire the necessary information and knowledge that might be valuable in the maturity of green innovations.

Originality/value

This study proposes that relationship learning plays a moderating role in the relationship between absorptive capacity and green innovation performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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