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Article

Ching-Hsuan Yeh, Hsin-Hui Lin, Yu-Ling Gau and Yi-Shun Wang

To examine the effectiveness of a multichannel strategy, this study mainly investigates two issues: (1) whether customers' five value perceptions (i.e. product quality…

Abstract

Purpose

To examine the effectiveness of a multichannel strategy, this study mainly investigates two issues: (1) whether customers' five value perceptions (i.e. product quality, service quality, innovation, price and store image) extend from e-stores to physical stores and (2) whether customers' five value perceptions derived from e-stores/physical stores facilitate purchase intention within and beyond the channel context.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a research model to elaborate on the relationships between the focal constructs and collects 177 useable responses via an online community and personal contacts survey. Partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) methods and mediation analyses are conducted to validate the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that the values perceived in e-stores/physical stores generally motivate online/offline purchase intention, respectively. Next, based on Tversky's belief/feature matching process, the five value perceptions correlate with their counterparts across online and offline channels. The results of the mediation analyses suggest that the advantages established in online channels may be contagious to offline channels at the belief level. Specifically, four of the five online value perceptions may have different effects on offline purchase intention: (1) product quality perceived in e-stores directly (negative) and indirectly (positive) results in offline purchase intention, demonstrating cannibalization effects and (2) service quality, innovation and store image perceived in e-stores indirectly and positively contribute to offline purchase intention, indicating synergetic effects.

Originality/value

The findings of this study provide several important theoretical and practical implications for multichannel and omnichannel retailing strategies.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

Keywords

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Article

Yi-Shun Wang, Ching-Hsuan Yeh, Yu-Min Wang, Timmy H. Tseng, Hsin-Hui Lin, Shinjeng Lin and Min-Quan Xie

With the proliferation of virtual reality (VR) applications in electronic commerce, investigations on the effects of VR on consumer responses are important. The purpose of…

Abstract

Purpose

With the proliferation of virtual reality (VR) applications in electronic commerce, investigations on the effects of VR on consumer responses are important. The purpose of this paper is to examine the effects of online presentation modes (i.e. situational VR, pure VR and picture) on consumer responses for three product types (i.e. geometric, material and mechanical).

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a 3×3 between-subjects experiment to validate the research model and hypotheses.

Findings

The results revealed that both the situational VR mode and the pure VR mode had a greater impact on product knowledge and purchase intention than the picture mode. The situational VR mode yielded a higher level of product knowledge and purchase intention than the pure VR mode although it was not statistically significant. Furthermore, the pattern of VR modes superiority was found to be consistent across geometric, material and mechanical product types.

Originality/value

This research study contributes to the VR literature by investigating a new type of VR: situational VR, and offering a more comprehensive picture of consumer responses to online product presentations. The authors then drew the implications from the findings to suggest guidelines for practitioners to efficiently allocate resources and maximize the effectiveness of online presentation modes.

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Article

Ching-Hsuan Yeh, Yi-Shun Wang, Shin-Jeng Lin, Timmy H. Tseng, Hsin-Hui Lin, Ying-Wei Shih and Yi-Hsuan Lai

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users…

Abstract

Purpose

Considering that users’ information privacy concerns may affect the development of e-commerce, the purpose of this paper is to explore what drives internet users’ willingness to provide personal information; further, the paper examines how extrinsic rewards moderate the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and willingness to provide personal information.

Design/methodology/approach

Data collected from 345 valid internet users in the context of electronic commerce were analyzed using the partial least squares approach.

Findings

The result showed that agreeableness, risk-taking propensity and experience of privacy invasion were three main antecedents of information privacy concerns among the seven individual factors. Additionally, information privacy concerns did not significantly affect users’ willingness to provide personal information in the privacy calculation mechanism; however, extrinsic rewards directly affected users’ disclosure intention. The authors found that extrinsic rewards had not moderated the relationship between users’ information privacy concerns and their willingness to provide personal information.

Originality/value

This study is an exploratory effort to develop and validate a model for explaining why internet users were willing to provide personal information. The results of this study are helpful to researchers in developing theories of information privacy concerns and to practitioners in promoting internet users’ willingness to provide personal information in an e-commerce context.

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Article

Yi-Wen Liao, Yi-Shun Wang and Ching-Hsuan Yeh

The purpose of this paper is to understand what drives customers’ behavioral loyalty and explore the relationship between intentional and behavioral loyalty in the context…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand what drives customers’ behavioral loyalty and explore the relationship between intentional and behavioral loyalty in the context of e-tailing.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the theory of reasoned action and the recency-frequency-monetary value model, this study proposes a research model to explore the relationships among satisfaction, switching cost, intentional loyalty (i.e. word of mouth (WOM) and repurchase intention), and behavioral loyalty (i.e. purchase frequency and monetary value). Data collected from 266 respondents in the context of e-tailing are tested against the research model using a partial least squares (PLS) approach.

Findings

The results indicate that both satisfaction and switching cost are positively related to intentional loyalty (i.e. WOM and repurchase intention), and that the relationship of satisfaction with intentional loyalty outweighs that of switching cost. Additionally, while repurchase intention significantly associates with purchase frequency and monetary value, a relatively small portion of the variance in both purchase frequency and monetary value are explained. More importantly, WOM is unrelated to both purchase frequency and monetary value. The insignificance of WOM and the low predictability of repurchase intention indicate that the relationship between intentional and behavioral loyalty is weak in e-tailing context.

Originality/value

This study provided empirical evidence to support the weak relationship between intentional and behavioral customer loyalty in the context of e-tailing. The findings provide several important theoretical and practical implications for e-tailing customer relationship management.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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Article

Hsin-Hui Lin, Shinjeng Lin, Ching-Hsuan Yeh and Yi-Shun Wang

Based on the literature on technology readiness, online learning readiness, and mobile computer anxiety, the purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a mobile…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the literature on technology readiness, online learning readiness, and mobile computer anxiety, the purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a mobile learning readiness (MLR) scale which can be used to assess individuals’ readiness to embrace m-learning systems.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on previous literature, this study conceptualizes the construct of MLR and generates an initial 55-item MLR scale. A total of 319 responses are collected from a three-month internet-based survey. Based on the sample data, this study provides an empirical validation of the MLR construct and its underlying dimensionality, and develops a generic MLR scale with desirable psychometric properties, including reliability, content validity, criterion-related validity, convergent validity, discriminant validity, and nomological validity.

Findings

This study develops and validates a 19-item MLR scale with three dimensions (i.e. m-learning self-efficacy, optimism, and self-directed learning). A tentative norm of the MLR scale is presented, and the scale’s theoretical and practical applications are also discussed.

Originality/value

This study is a pioneering effort to develop and validate a MLR scale. The results of this study are helpful to researchers in building m-learning theories and to educators in assessing and promoting individuals’ acceptance of m-learning systems.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

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