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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Low Sui Pheng, Deng Xiaopeng and Quek Li Ting

The ancient principles of Chinese geomancy appear to share the same goal as total building performance (TBP) in delivering an optimal environment for occupants that…

Abstract

Purpose

The ancient principles of Chinese geomancy appear to share the same goal as total building performance (TBP) in delivering an optimal environment for occupants that promotes their well‐being. This research aims to evaluate the relevance and applicability of Chinese geomancy principles and scenarios with respect to the six TBP mandates.

Design/methodology/approach

The Chinese geomancy concepts vary from considerations relating to openings and colours to surrounding amenities and building height. The assimilated principles and scenarios in both domains are tested through a survey questionnaire of 32 building professionals in Singapore.

Findings

The t‐test statistics indicate that 25 of the 26 Chinese geomancy principles and 12 of the 20 Chinese geomancy scenarios are significantly applicable for the TBP mandates at the 95 per cent confidence interval. This supports the hypothesis that there are common denominators between Chinese geomancy and TBP.

Practical implications

The research examines Chinese geomancy's Form Theory, Yin and Yang Theory, the Classical Compass School and the Black Sect School with respect to the six building performance mandates in terms of the psychological, physiological, sociological and economic aspects. Chinese geomancy principles and scenarios are assimilated in the context of the TBP mandates with the support of evidence from existing literature.

Originality/value

This research provides a back to the basics, macro perspective of the relevance and applicability of Chinese geomancy principles and scenarios with respect to TBP and reveals possible limitations in actual application. However, it also observes that specific scenarios of Chinese geomancy concerning openings, key occupancy locations, building height, trees and roads are not applicable for all contexts. Further research should be carried out to identify the reasons for the inapplicability of certain scenarios, which are caused by different climatic and cultural context of applications, failure to account for technological advancement, and the evolution of Chinese geomancy since time immemorial.

Details

Facilities, vol. 30 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Sui Pheng Low, Shang Gao and Jun Kai Ang

There have recently been an increasing number of scientific studies exploring the effectiveness of practising Chinese geomancy or feng shui in the built environment…

Abstract

Purpose

There have recently been an increasing number of scientific studies exploring the effectiveness of practising Chinese geomancy or feng shui in the built environment. However, these are rather generic studies focusing mainly on urban planning, architecture and interior design. The impetus for this present research stems from the lack of understanding relating to the practice of feng shui in Facilities Management (FM). Bridging these two disciplines, this study examines the relevance of and relationship between feng shui and FM principles.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire survey was conducted, the results of which affirm the validity of the assimilated relationships between the two disciplines. Interviews with three groups of experts – the feng shui practitioners, facilities managers and feng shui practitioners who are also building professionals – were also conducted to verify the assimilation of the two disciplines with a view to draw new perspectives for better understanding.

Findings

The principles of feng shui and FM were studied, and the validity of the relationships between 15 feng shui principles and three FM activities were examined. The latter relates specifically to building fabric cleaning, routine external site/lot cleaning and road and pavement cleaning. It was found that specific feng shui principles and scenarios appear to influence the three FM activities. The statistical analysis shows that the means of specific feng shui scenarios in relation to FM activities were consistently higher than those of the feng shui principles. The one-sample t-test indicates that all the feng shui principles were significant in affecting the three FM activities.

Research limitations/implications

This study provides a better understanding of the relevance of feng shui principles influencing FM principles. It also revealed the challenges and limitations in bridging the relationships between these two disciplines.

Originality/value

This study is the first investigation to examine the relevance and relationship between feng shui and FM practice. This serves to encourage further research to determine how feng shui design implementation will affect the ease of conducting FM activities. If the relationship is established, as is the case from this study, then the implementation of feng shui principles in building design can be encouraged to positively influence the ease of conducting FM activities downstream in the occupancy stage. This can serve to contribute to the improvement of sustainable building design. It can also contribute to the scientific investigation of feng shui, which has so far been largely overlooked in built environment studies. Such studies can help to demystify and provide logical and scientific interpretations of how feng shui principles actually work.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Property Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1994

J.S. Perry Hobson

Feng Shui (pronounced “fung shui”) means literally wind and water and is atype of geomancy or divination from nature. It originated in China, andrelates to nature and the…

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Abstract

Feng Shui (pronounced “fung shui”) means literally wind and water and is a type of geomancy or divination from nature. It originated in China, and relates to nature and the position of man and of buildings within it. Many hotels and restaurants in the Asia‐Pacific region have been specifically designed using feng shui principles, and recently Hilton International hotels used this as the focus of their advertising campaign. Discusses the origins of feng shui, and its impact on the location, design, layout, fixture and fittings and marketing of hotels and restaurants.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 6 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 12 October 2012

Xiaoling Zhang

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229

Abstract

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Facilities, vol. 30 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Francis Piron

Following the upheavals of the revolutionary era, the People's Republic of China's consumer culture is somewhat over 20 years old. This research aims at discovering and…

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5233

Abstract

Purpose

Following the upheavals of the revolutionary era, the People's Republic of China's consumer culture is somewhat over 20 years old. This research aims at discovering and thus better understanding what Chinese consumers value most among their possessions. In turn, this finding should help better understand the contemporary Chinese culture.

Design/methodology/approach

The general research approach utilized in this effort is qualitative. All data were collected through at‐home, in‐depth personal interviews, following established guidelines outlined by Lincoln and Guba, and Wallendorf and Belk. A snowball sampling resulted in the participation of 20 rural and 20 urban households.

Findings

Participants' demographic profile ended up matching well the national profile in terms of income, and the gender and age make‐up of the rural and urban samples were not significantly different. Four categories emerged to comprehensively represent all the favorite products identified by the participants: entertainment, functional, hedonic, and mementos. In addition, a numerically significant number of participants could neither think of a favorite product nor possess one. As developed in the paper, conventional typologies, such as Hofstede and Triandis' collectivism‐individualism do not account well for the results observed in this study. Rather, the study turns towards Lu's research and suggestion that using instruments developed by Western cultures suffer from methodological defects when applied to Chinese behaviors. This research then defines the Yi, a Confucian value related to benevolence, morality, righteousness, and the Li, a Mohist/Legalist value related to utilitarianism and profit, and suggests that the two better help understand the findings and support observations.

Research limitations/implications

The nature of qualitative research clearly limits the generalization of its findings, and therefore to offer more definitive results, future efforts would have to consider other methods. Also, and while great care is taken to ensure the validity of the data collection process, there is always the possibility that some respondents may not have been as candid or truthful as would be hoped. However, and altogether, findings from this research do match well what public media have often been reporting, and what frequent casual observations point out.

Practical implications

China's contemporary culture is rapidly changing, somehow breaking away from traditions, yet retaining core values and reshaping them with modern, sometimes alien inputs. This research clearly indicates what motivates the younger generations, raised in a nation governed by an all‐controlling Communist party that orchestrates an openly capitalistic, materialistic societal development. Such apparent contradictions, the result of “Socialism with Chinese Characteristics,” may be puzzling to some in the Western world but are not so with today's Chinese consumers.

Originality/value

This research is unique in its topic and research approach, given that it deals with Chinese consumers, the largest block of consumers in the world. It offers a perspective, not yet considered within the marketing and consumer research literature, that seems to explain well what is observed.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2004

Albert T.P. So and Andrew Y.T. Leung

This paper presents the results of an attitudinal survey of residential and commercial building users from three Chinese cities – Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei. The…

Abstract

This paper presents the results of an attitudinal survey of residential and commercial building users from three Chinese cities – Hong Kong, Shanghai and Taipei. The results have been obtained from a much larger survey, primarily involving the living and working standards in the three cities. Apart from the descriptive statistics showing the preferences of the user, inferential statistics also showed significant differences among the attitudes of citizens living in the three cities. The results could give insights to designers and developers on the improvement of building standards.

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Facilities, vol. 22 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 25 June 2020

Jeffrey Boon Hui Yap and Kah Chuan Lum

This study aims to investigate Feng Shui elements that can influence housing selection and property pricing in the Malaysian housing market.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate Feng Shui elements that can influence housing selection and property pricing in the Malaysian housing market.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured questionnaire encompassing 26 Feng Shui elements, which were shortlisted based on relevant previous studies, was distributed to prospective homebuyers in the Klang Valley region. The elements were inferred and ranked according to frequency, significance and importance scores. Kruskal–Wallis ANOVA tests were used to assess the ratings provided by the different respondent groups, while Spearman's rank correlation tests were utilised to measure the degree of agreement or disagreement among each pair of the ethnic group.

Findings

The results obtained indicate the following as the five most influential elements: orientation, main entrance, street location, house number and living room. Despite a multiethnic and multicultural society in Malaysia, Spearman's rank correlation tests showed that there are no differences in the prioritisation of Feng Shui elements between three distinct ethnic groups (Malay, Chinese and Indian). However, the distribution scores are statistically different between the groups. Comparing income level with Feng Shui inclinations, the three most frequently considered elements across the three income groups consistently include orientation, main entrance and street location.

Practical implications

The findings of this study are expected to provide guidance to property stakeholders (developers, real estate agencies, architects, local authorities) in their future development projects. For homebuyers, this study serves as a property Feng Shui checklist for home selection and investment.

Originality/value

This study explored the association of Feng Shui principles to housing selection and property pricing based on cultural and income factors. These findings provide useful insights for designing and positioning of residential properties in both primary and secondary housing markets in Malaysia and beyond.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2012

Jill Poulston and Rene Bennett

This exploratory study aims to determine whether a relationship is likely to exist between good feng shui and success.

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1893

Abstract

Purpose

This exploratory study aims to determine whether a relationship is likely to exist between good feng shui and success.

Design/methodology/approach

The feng shui of eight hotel foyers and entrances were evaluated against 20 criteria, and managers asked to comment on the success of their hotels. Results were examined for possible relationships between feng shui and their descriptions of success.

Findings

Similarities between the reported success of hotel and feng shui evaluations were found in six out of the eight hotels in the study.

Research limitations/implications

Responses on success were subjective and based on five criteria, which were insufficient to determine the existence of a firm relationship between actual success and feng shui. However, this was an exploratory study, and the relationships were sufficiently strong to warrant further research.

Practical implications

Findings suggest that feng shui offers useful design principles, and hotels with good feng shui are described as being more successful than those with poor feng shui. Good feng shui appears to have a positive effect on feelings of success.

Originality/value

This is the first study that attempts to test the relationship between good feng shui and success.

Details

Facilities, vol. 30 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Appa Rao Korukonda

The Asia‐Pacific region today is swept by an unprecedented rate of change, complexity, interconnectedness, and uncertainty. Now perhaps more than at any other time since…

Abstract

The Asia‐Pacific region today is swept by an unprecedented rate of change, complexity, interconnectedness, and uncertainty. Now perhaps more than at any other time since World War II, the region is becoming acutely aware of its ethnic diversity, its ideological jumble, and its political mélange – all of which increase its vulnerability in the emerging world order. There is also a simultaneous need for recognition of the areas of commonalty and of the potential of the Asia Pacific region for organizing itself into a legitimate counterweight to the two trading communities from the West – the European Community (EC) and the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Against this background, this article examines some of the common features in quality management for global competitiveness and relates them to themes such as the management practices and metaphysical belief systems of the Asia Pacific region. Implications for the future are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 15 no. 8/9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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