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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Chimezie Ozurumba

Corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2006. As a result, the annual gambling…

Abstract

Corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2006. As a result, the annual gambling revenue realized by the casino industry has grown from $9 billion in 1991 to over $32 billion in 2006. The growth of gambling in many states has not been matched by a corresponding increase in academic research on casino gambling. To shed more light on casino gambling and state budgets, this research examines state education spending following the introduction of corporate casino gambling and attempts to answer the following question: Does gambling revenue earmarked for education spending displace funds usually spent on these programs?

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2009

Chimezie Ozurumba and Younhee Kim

In the past two decades, corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2007. As a…

Abstract

In the past two decades, corporate casino gambling has expanded from being legal in only two U.S. states (Nevada and New Jersey) in the late 1980s to 12 states in 2007. As a result, the annual gambling revenue realized by the casino industry has grown from $9 billion in 1991 to more than $34 billion in 2007. The growth of gambling revenue as a source of additional state tax revenue, however, has not been matched by a corresponding increase of academic research on casino gambling. The research addresses the question of whether states are maximizing collected corporate casino tax revenue and finds that states fall into one of four clusters: undertaxing; overtaxing; undertaxing but close to the revenuemaximization tax level; and overtaxing but close to the revenue-maximization tax level.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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