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Article

Daphyne Saunders Thomas

Considers that, in addition to all the positive attributes of the Internet, negatives are bound to emerge. Negative influences include the ability of children to access…

Abstract

Considers that, in addition to all the positive attributes of the Internet, negatives are bound to emerge. Negative influences include the ability of children to access information that is not suitable for their age and the absence of laws or legal legislation to limit this access to the material. Laws are in existence prohibiting young people under the age of 18 years from accessing sexually explicit or sexually deviant materials. The problem with the Internet is the fact that there is no sanction limiting people from posting material of this kind. Warns that as an increasing number of children get online, solutions to these controversial issues must be discussed openly.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 7 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

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Article

Karen E. Soeters and Katinka van Schaik

More and more children have access to the internet. Surfing the web can be a wonderful experience but also one fraught with danger, and not all parents and educators are…

Abstract

Purpose

More and more children have access to the internet. Surfing the web can be a wonderful experience but also one fraught with danger, and not all parents and educators are aware that children can be exposed to unsuitable content online. Another question rises, and that is what is disturbing for children online? Are there gender and age differences and very important what do children do when they encounter disturbing or harmful information? Aims to discuss this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper explores the positive and negative experiences of Dutch children on the web. It is based on a survey of 391 children aged eight to 13 years who have home access to the internet.

Findings

Children's most common positive experiences are playing games, using ICQ or MSN and chatting. Almost 50 percent of the respondents have had a negative experience on the internet. Children most frequently reported encountering pornography, followed by violence, computer viruses and/or their computers crashing. Approximately 80 percent told someone else about their negative experience, and, although it might be expected that this was a parent or a teacher, 45 percent of the children shared their experience with a friend.

Practical implications

Only by knowing these facts can one start thinking about how one can make the Internet a safer place for children.

Originality/value

The survey also revealed several significant age and/or gender differences in how children experience the internet.

Details

New Library World, vol. 107 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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Article

Peter Kennison and Malcolm Read

In the second of two articles, the potential of the internet for child victimisation by paedophiles and the challenges for controls that the technology poses are…

Abstract

In the second of two articles, the potential of the internet for child victimisation by paedophiles and the challenges for controls that the technology poses are discussed. The links between the availability of imagery and the actual practice of paedophilia are considered and the problems of legal definition and control policies are outlined. The article concludes by outlining some controls presently available and makes suggestions for improved policing.

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Safer Communities, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

Barbie Clarke

There are now 3.6 million Internet users aged 7–16 in the UK. Over half of all children, 51%, now have access to the Internet in school or at home, a massive leap from 31…

Abstract

There are now 3.6 million Internet users aged 7–16 in the UK. Over half of all children, 51%, now have access to the Internet in school or at home, a massive leap from 31% just over a year ago. Although there are more boys on‐line than girls, the gap is narrowing with 54% of boys, and 48% of girls using the Internet now, compared to 49% of boys, and just 39% of girls six months ago. NOP Family's latest wave of ‘kids.net’ research shows that the Internet is now becoming an important marketing tool for any organisation that wants to market to children. The research, which aims to measure children's use of the Internet in school and at home, was conducted last October/November. A nationally representative sample of children aged 7–16 were interviewed for the study. 2001 face to face interviews were carried out in children's homes, and focus groups were held with boys and girls aged 7–8, 9–10, 11–12, 13–14. The study is now an established syndicated tracking study carried out every six months with 18 clients taking part from broadcasting, the media, advertising, fmcg, government, financial services, and .com companies and organisations. The DfEE has been a sponsor from the beginning, and has given NOP Family some useful input into the structure of the study.

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International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

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Article

Kerry Sheldon

This review aims to focus on men who access, download, and circulate child abuse images across the internet as the most frequently occurring type of internet sex offender.

Abstract

Purpose

This review aims to focus on men who access, download, and circulate child abuse images across the internet as the most frequently occurring type of internet sex offender.

Design/methodology/approach

Some of the misconceptions associated with this behaviour are outlined and the extent to which internet offenders display some of the criminogenic factors thought to be associated with the multi‐factorial theories of sexual offending are reviewed.

Findings

One conclusion from this is paper is the general impression that internet offenders show many of the characteristics of paedophiles. Their theoretical importance is that they appear to be “desisters” from acting out their sexual interest in children by hands‐on offending.

Originality/value

It is argued that there is a need for more research to stimulate our understanding of this type of offender. Furthermore, what of those who both download material and offend directly against children? They present a dilemma for the literature as some research would suggest that they are not entirely like the internet or the contact sexual offenders in their psychological make‐up; they are the group most in need of reappraisal.

Details

The British Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6646

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Article

Wen‐Ling Liu, Philip Kitchen and Argyris Moskovos

The purpose of this paper is to examine parental perceptions of the impact of children's internet usage in the Republic of Cyprus.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine parental perceptions of the impact of children's internet usage in the Republic of Cyprus.

Design/methodology/approach

The measures for the survey are synthesized from the existing literature. The paper looks at how Cypriot parents' attitudes lead them to empower their children's use of the internet. It also explores whether parental attitudes act as an obstacle in restraining children's usage of the internet, and their rationales.

Findings

The research findings highlight the importance of children's internet protection in relation to the role of parents. Apart from virus concerns and governmental promotions strategies as main barriers to children's internet usage, the engaged family time is found as a unique barrier to retard internet adoption in Cyprus.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this paper is that the data are limited by use of non‐probability quota sampling with only the views of parents, which may limit the generalization of the results.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to the marketing literature on children internet usage and the roles of parents and governmental promotion strategies related to internet adoption.

Details

EuroMed Journal of Business, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1450-2194

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Article

Fenio Annansingh and Thomas Veli

This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their knowledge and experience with electronic safety (e-safety) measures. It also considered parents’, teachers’ and other stakeholders’ perception of internet risks, e-safety procedures and children’s practices while online.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a mixed method approach which involved the use of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results were presented and analysed using descriptive statistics, while the interviews utilised coding and data structuring.

Findings

This research highlighted that e-safety policies and procedures have not kept up to date with technological advances. Children were also developing an online presence, and because it was considered normative behaviour, they were not always cautious. Consequently, society was reactive when dealing with the internet risk issues. Hence, more resources were needed to educate parents and children on safe practices on the internet.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and further research should be conducted for broader generalisations.

Practical implications

The paper makes a number of practical recommendations for education providers and parents to raise awareness of internet risks and e-safety initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper further extends the body of theory on e-safety and provides new insights into the risks exposure of children on the internet. It also highlights the limitations of e-safety initiatives.

Details

Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article

Despo Ktoridou, Nikleia Eteokleous and Anastasia Zahariadou

The purpose of the study is to explore parents’ level of awareness in relation to the threats that children are exposed to when using the internet. Additionally, it…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to explore parents’ level of awareness in relation to the threats that children are exposed to when using the internet. Additionally, it explores the parental interest to raise their awareness on internet use and threats, as well as investigating their interest in establishing household environment safety measures in their household and a secure internet system in order to protect their children.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a mixed method approach where quantitative and qualitative data were collected (Creswell). Questionnaires were used to collect the quantitative data and focus groups were organized for the qualitative data collection. The study's target population consisted of parents in two major cities in Cyprus, Nicosia and Larnaca. Non probability sampling was used to distribute 400 questionnaires to parents. The response rate was 55 percent, since 220 completed questionnaires were returned. The focus groups were organized as soon as the results of the questionnaires were analyzed. Eight focus groups (four focus groups with parents and four focus groups with children) were organized.

Findings

The results of the study are grouped in the following categories: internet uses, internet dangers and children, parents’ awareness on internet dangers, parents’ concerns, parents’ experience with internet dangers and productive measures.

Originality/value

The study provides practical and scientific implications related to raise parents’ and students’ awareness on internet safety, explaining the role of the various stakeholders involved.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article

Ludwig Lowenstein

This article summarises recent research into the subject of downloading child pornography and the different kinds of individuals engaged in the activity. Current attitudes…

Abstract

This article summarises recent research into the subject of downloading child pornography and the different kinds of individuals engaged in the activity. Current attitudes to paedophilia are assessed. The question as to whether the downloading of pornographic paedophile material always leads to paedophilia is a core discussion. The law and current views on downloading are also discussed. The issue of whether downloaders of such materials are a danger is addressed and ways of preventing children being sexually exploited via the internet are explored.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

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Article

Emily Allbon and Peter Williams

Focuses specifically on children’s experiences of the Internet, including the extent of their exposure to sexual, racial or other unpleasant material, how teachers view…

Abstract

Focuses specifically on children’s experiences of the Internet, including the extent of their exposure to sexual, racial or other unpleasant material, how teachers view this problem, and what action schools are taking. The questionnaire survey found a higher number of children with Internet access at home than previous studies; this was regardless of the socio‐economic group. Figures of those who had seen unpleasant or offensive material were also higher than previous research has shown. Teachers’ views were also canvassed. Many staff were unaware of their schools’ Internet use policies, and had little or no training in using the Internet with children. The study concludes that more needs to be done to both meet government online targets and to address the issue of free Internet use with children’s protection. Suggestions regarding the role of librarians are offered.

Details

New Library World, vol. 103 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

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