Search results

1 – 10 of over 50000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 March 2010

Pankaj Priya, Rajat Kanti Baisya and Seema Sharma

Children differ in their cognitive ability while trying to interpret television advertisements and hence form different attitudes towards them. The purpose of this paper…

Downloads
11453

Abstract

Purpose

Children differ in their cognitive ability while trying to interpret television advertisements and hence form different attitudes towards them. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the impact of children's attitudes towards television advertisements on their resultant buying behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

The research has been based on exploratory and descriptive research design. Exploratory research includes a literature review and in‐depth interviews with child psychologists, advertisers and parents of young children. This was further carried forward by carrying out a survey of children in the age group five to 11 years, while they were in their class room. The filling up of the questionnaires was aided by the class teacher, which had response options in a pictorial manner.

Findings

The demand for the advertised products is heavily influenced by the children's attitude towards advertisements. Further, the cognitive changes among the different age groups leads to the formation of varying attitudes towards the advertisements. Yet there are other potent factors apart from advertisements, which result in the requests for a product or brand.

Research limitations/implications

The paper has been carried out among children studying in English medium schools in the National Capital region of Delhi. Hence, the sample size is too small and restricted. The interplay of the various buying dimensions on each other have not been probed.

Practical implications

More focused approach is required by advertisers while planning their advertisement campaign for different age groups of children, rather than considering them as one homogenous group. Various elements of the advertisements have to be meticulously planned for different age groups.

Originality/value

At the lower age group it is the entertaining ability of the advertisements, whereas at the higher age groups the credibilty element in the advertisements has the potential of creating a favourable attitude towards the advertisements. There seems to be a complex relationship between attitude formation towards advertisements and the resulting buying behaviour because of the presence of other intervening variables. Characters from folklores can be depicted for creating aspiration.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 28 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 14 June 2011

Shaun Powell, Stephanie Langlands and Chris Dodd

Extant research downplays the influence of children under the age of eight on food‐related decision making and consumption within families. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Downloads
2082

Abstract

Purpose

Extant research downplays the influence of children under the age of eight on food‐related decision making and consumption within families. This paper seeks to address this issue.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising novel techniques to elicit responses, the research employed focus group and interviews of a sample of children aged between three and eight years and a sample of their parents.

Findings

The exploratory findings of this study suggest that younger children apply effective if less sophisticated pestering techniques than older children, and play a significant role in determining family food consumption. They demonstrate a purposeful and directed pursuit of food brands and products, along with an awareness of the purpose of promotion and a desire to use a number of persuasive techniques in their dealings with parents. This contradicts some of the existing thinking that younger children in the 3‐8 year age group have little/less influence on purchasing food.

Originality/value

This research offers a number of contributions in that it presents the views of both children and parents, and uses novel techniques through visual representations of feelings and emotions to elicit findings.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Timothy L. Keiningham, Lerzan Aksoy, Tor W. Andreassen and Demitry Estrin

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between parent satisfaction and child retention at a childcare provider.

Downloads
2143

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between parent satisfaction and child retention at a childcare provider.

Design/methodology/approach

The survey data used in the analyses involves a sample size of 1,003 respondents, all clients of a regional childcare provider in the USA. Logistic regression was used to test the propositions.

Findings

The results indicate that parent satisfaction is most important to child retention when the child is very young (birth to one year of age). As children increase in age, however, parent satisfaction becomes increasingly less predictive of children's continued enrollment at a childcare facility.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this research is that it tests the propositions within a single firm. Future research should attempt to replicate these findings across several childcare providers.

Practical implications

Emphasizing improvements in different attributes for different age groups has implications for increasing retention for childcare providers, in addition to ultimately increasing the satisfaction of parents.

Originality/value

While all would agree that childcare services are of extremely high importance (at both a national and individual level), no research to date has examined the role of parent satisfaction to the continued enrollment of a child at a childcare facility. Our findings show that the presumed relationship between satisfaction and retention varies greatly by the age of child.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 23 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 24 July 2009

Shireen Kanji

This research aims to illustrate the differential treatment of children and pensioners in Russia and to explain why this has not led to age group conflict through an…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to illustrate the differential treatment of children and pensioners in Russia and to explain why this has not led to age group conflict through an illustration of age group interdependency.

Design/methodology/approach

Age group conflict is revealed through analysis of the government's policies to age groups and expenditure preferences. Interdependency is analysed by the calculation of poverty rates and contribution of age specific benefits, using nationally representative sample survey data.

Findings

The Russian government treated pensioners preferentially to children, even though children were at higher risk of poverty. However, within each age group poverty rates are mediated by household structures. Pensioners who live with children face higher poverty rates than the average for pensioners and those who co‐reside with lone mothers face the highest poverty rates of all pensioners, while their pension contribution to the household is of vital significance. Children living with one grandparent face higher poverty rates than average, whereas and those living with two grandparents face lower poverty rates.

Research limitations/implications

The structure of intergenerational relationships and financial solidarity between generations provide essential context for understanding individual welfare in Russia.

Practical implications

Children's downgraded status in Russian society needs to be urgently addressed. Lone mothers, their children and their parents face the highest poverty rates and need of support. Amongst pensioners, women pensioners are particularly at risk.

Originality/value

The originality is in using two opposing perspectives on relations between age groups to show that preferential treatment of pensioners coexists with a high degree of financial linkage between generations.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 29 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2004

Jill Ross and Rod Harradine

This study was conducted at a school in the north‐east of England using a range of research methods including pre‐focus groups, focus groups, a census of all children and…

Downloads
10227

Abstract

This study was conducted at a school in the north‐east of England using a range of research methods including pre‐focus groups, focus groups, a census of all children and a survey of parents. It was designed to address a series of research questions related to the relationship between young school children and branding. The findings indicated that brand recognition commences at an early age with older age groups having greater brand awareness. Differences in the perceptions of parents and their children towards brands were identified, with parents expressing their concerns over the effects of branding. Older children were aware of the role of branding in enhancing self‐esteem and acceptance in peer groups. It is suggested that the earlier the marketer establishes brand awareness and recognition in the child, the stronger the brand association and imagery are likely to be when they become independent as consumers.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 6 May 2019

Michael Rigby, Shalmali Deshpande, Daniela Luzi, Fabrizio Pecoraro, Oscar Tamburis, Ilaria Rocco, Barbara Corso, Nadia Minicuci, Harshana Liyanage, Uy Hoang, Filipa Ferreira, Simon de Lusignan, Ekelechi MacPepple and Heather Gage

In order to assess the state of health of Europe’s children, or to appraise the systems and models of healthcare delivery, data about children are essential, with as much…

Abstract

In order to assess the state of health of Europe’s children, or to appraise the systems and models of healthcare delivery, data about children are essential, with as much precision and accuracy as possible by small group characteristic. Unfortunately, the experience of the Models of Child Health Appraised (MOCHA) project and its scientists shows that this ideal is seldom met, and thus the accuracy of appraisal or planning work is compromised. In the project, we explored the data collected on children by a number of databases used in Europe and globally, to find that although the four quinquennial age bands are common, it is impossible to represent children aged 0–17 years as a legally defined group in statistical analysis. Adolescents, in particular, are the most invisible age group despite this being a time of life when they are rapidly changing and facing increasing challenges. In terms of measurement and monitoring, there is little progress from work of nearly two decades ago that recommended an information system, and no focus on the creation of a policy and ethical framework to allow collaborative analysis of the rich anonymised databases that hold real-world people-based data. In respect of data systems and surveillance, nearly all systems in European society pay lip service to the importance of children, but do not accommodate them in a practical and statistical sense.

Details

Issues and Opportunities in Primary Health Care for Children in Europe
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-354-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 September 2002

Jens Halling and Birgitte Tufte

Maps differences among Danish children of 5‐18 years from the perspective of children as consumers; Denmark is a society characterised by high Internet use and a high…

Abstract

Maps differences among Danish children of 5‐18 years from the perspective of children as consumers; Denmark is a society characterised by high Internet use and a high degree of gender equality. Examines purchasing power, brand awareness, and media use; the media studied were internet, TV, cinema, and mobile phones. Explains the methodology used, which was both qualitative and quantitative, used self‐report questionnaires, and divided the study group into four age groups. Concludes that there are distinct differences between boys and girls: boys are better informed about brands, have more pocket money, use the Internet more, have better access to cable and satellite television, prefer computer games to internet chat, and have more positive attitudes to advertisements; the gender differences grow, reach a maximum in the 8‐12 year old group, and then diminish.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2002

Kara Chan, James U. McNeal and Fanny Chan

Examines how much attention urban mainland Chinese children pay to television commercials, their response to different types of commercials, and their perceptions of the…

Abstract

Examines how much attention urban mainland Chinese children pay to television commercials, their response to different types of commercials, and their perceptions of the quality of advertised and non‐advertised brands. Classifies the types of commercials seen as funny, animated, public service, celebrity endorsements, and those that increase knowledge, and relates these types to the four age groups of the children studied. Concludes that children pay a decreasing amount of attention to commercials as they get older, and that the link between liking a commercial and impulse buying of its product also lessens; confidence in advertised brands does not increase with age, but confidence in non‐advertised brands decreases with age.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 May 2019

Marcelo Royo Vela and Leonardo Ortegon-Cortazar

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between specific sensory motivations (i.e. flavor) and the development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between specific sensory motivations (i.e. flavor) and the development of preference for food, beverages or brands by preteen consumers; and second, to compare the three age groups within the concrete operations stage toward the hypothesis contrast that states that the higher the cognitive development, the more recognized and recalled a brand will be.

Design/methodology/approach

The research techniques implemented were observation (exploratory phase) and personal survey using a paper and pencil questionnaire. The food products and beverages, brands, jingles and isotypes used were based on a convenience sample of 131 lunch boxes. A sample of 682 preteens aged 6–11 in the concrete operation stage obtained by convenience and snowball sampling participated.

Findings

When choosing one product or brand over the other, the results highlight flavor as compared with other more secondary sensory motivations, and there are clear differences between the younger and older age groups. In respect of advertising recall and brand recognition, the older age group shows higher frequencies of correct jingle-brand and isotype-brand association.

Originality/value

Despite product and brand consumption in the child segment relevance further motivational research is needed to identify the factors that influence preferences. The results obtained show that there are preferences and motives for product consumption that can be attributed to the functioning of the senses by the preteen consumer as well as differences within the concrete operations stage.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 January 2019

Maree Thyne, Kirsten Robertson, Leah Watkins and Olly Casey

Children are familiar with retail outlets (especially supermarkets) and the reality of shopping from an increasingly early age. In turn, retailers are actively engaging…

Abstract

Purpose

Children are familiar with retail outlets (especially supermarkets) and the reality of shopping from an increasingly early age. In turn, retailers are actively engaging this young market, targeting them through various promotional strategies. One popular strategy adopted by grocery retailers is giveaway collectible set items. The purpose of this paper is to question the ethicality of such campaigns, within the framework of vulnerable consumers by examining children’s opinions of the campaigns and the supermarkets who run them, and the drivers of children’s involvement in the campaigns.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative focus groups were employed with 67 children aged five to ten years. Focus groups were made up of children in similar age groups to cluster responses by age and allow for comparisons. Thematic analysis was undertaken and responses were coded into themes.

Findings

Children were initially driven to collect through promotional advertising or because a third party offered them a collectible. The drivers for subsequent collecting differed between age groups, with younger children more focussed on themes around play and older children (seven and above) collecting through habit, because it was a craze amongst their peers and therefore the collections became items of social currency. Children’s perceptions of the supermarkets motivations also differed by age. Younger children thought supermarkets gave the collectibles away as “gifts” for altruistic reasons. The older children articulated a clear understanding of the economic motives of the organisation including: to attract children to their stores, to encourage pester power and to increase revenue by encouraging customers to buy more. The older children questioned the ethics of the collectible campaigns, referring to them as scams.

Research limitations/implications

The findings extend the important discussion on the nature of children’s vulnerability to advertising by showing that the children’s vulnerability stretches beyond their ability to understand advertising intent. Despite older children in the present study being cognisant of retailers’ intentions they were still vulnerable to the scheme; the embeddedness of the scheme in the social lives of the children meant they lacked agency to opt out of it. Further, the finding that the scheme transcended boundaries in the children’s lives, for instance, being associated with social currency at school, highlights the potential negative impact such schemes can have on the well-being of children.

Originality/value

Until now, research has investigated the motivations that children have to collect, but previous studies have focussed on collections which have been determined by the children. This paper presents the opinions and perceptions of the children who are directly targeted by commercial organisations to collect and raises concerns around the ethicality of such schemes.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 50000