Search results

1 – 10 of over 1000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 September 2011

Keeley J. Pratt, Angela L. Lamson, Suzanne Lazorick, Carmel Parker White, David N. Collier, Mark B. White and Melvin S. Swanson

This review paper seeks to conceptualise childhood obesity through clinical, operational, and financial procedures. It informs multiple disciplines about: the trajectory…

Abstract

Purpose

This review paper seeks to conceptualise childhood obesity through clinical, operational, and financial procedures. It informs multiple disciplines about: the trajectory of paediatric obesity and current recommendations; the trends in the clinical, administrative/policy and financial worlds of paediatric obesity; and discusses commonly misunderstood collaborative terms.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on analysis of national and international policy documents and research papers in the field.

Findings

Paediatric obesity treatment teams, programmes, and providers could all benefit from a document that bridges the disciplines of medicine, other professions, and financial management. A family centred, multidisciplinary approach is necessary at all stages of obesity treatment care and the three‐world model discussed is helpful in achieving this. The clinical, operational, and financial aspects of the service need to be integrated in a way that reduces the barriers to accessing services.

Originality/value

The paper combines perspectives from different service sectors: clinical, operational, and financial. To facilitate interdisciplinary cooperation, it offers common definitions of terms that often have different meanings for those involved.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 6 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 26 June 2007

Fiona Davidson

The aim of this literature review is to summarise and synthesise the research base concerning childhood obesity and physical activity, particularly in relation to teachers…

Downloads
10760

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this literature review is to summarise and synthesise the research base concerning childhood obesity and physical activity, particularly in relation to teachers and schools and within a policy context of the UK. The review investigates childhood obesity, physical activity, physical education, the role of teachers, the role of schools and physical activity in the classroom.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review was undertaken involving selection of primary research and other systematic reviews. A computer search was performed using a combination of keywords including: obesity, prevention, intervention, preventive, teachers, schools, healthy schools, role models, physical activity, physical education, active school, active classroom. The review also includes samples of media coverage of the issue.

Findings

This review highlights the complex and ambiguous nature of the evidence in relation to this important contemporary issue.

Originality/value

A limited understanding of childhood obesity is evident from the review and this precludes definitive conclusions in relation to almost all aspects of the agenda. More quality research is needed in almost all areas of the topic, including areas such as the engagement of schools and teachers.

Details

Health Education, vol. 107 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2010

Jason M. Fletcher

Obesity in children in many developing countries has increased substantially over the last several decades. This change has implications for population health and human…

Abstract

Obesity in children in many developing countries has increased substantially over the last several decades. This change has implications for population health and human capital due to the strong persistence in weight through adulthood and the large social costs of a growing number of unhealthy individuals. As suggested by many educational interventions, targeting health status during early childhood may be more efficient and equitable due to accumulation of effects. Thus, examining the primary sources of obesity and obesity disparities is important, including focuses on school, family, and community factors, among others. Recent evidence has suggested that racial differences in obesity status occur before school age and are difficult to explain. However, this chapter shows that with nationally representative data, the differences can be explained and point to poverty, family structure, and home language rather than race as focal factors for future interventions. Suggestive evidence is also provided that parental investments in physical activities are associated with early-childhood weight status.

Details

Current Issues in Health Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-155-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 February 2011

Melanie Babooram, Barbara Ann Mullan and Louise Sharpe

The aim of this paper is to qualitatively examine the ways in which primary school children, aged between 7 and 12, perceive various facets of obesity as defined by the…

Downloads
2346

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to qualitatively examine the ways in which primary school children, aged between 7 and 12, perceive various facets of obesity as defined by the common sense model of illness representation (CCM).

Design/methodology/approach

The study was qualitative in nature. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 33 children on all dimensions of the CSM. Twenty four children were normal weight and nine were overweight. A drawing task formed the methodology for the “identity” section of the interview.

Findings

Although children identified food intake as a main cause of obesity, almost half did not name sedentary behaviours as a cause of obesity. Duration (timeline) of obesity was regarded by most children as reliant on a person's undertaking of positive health behaviours. Normal weight children were found to list more severe consequences of obesity than the overweight group. It was found that experience contributed to the detailed knowledge of overweight children's perceptions of cures of obesity. Overweight children also spoke of personal incidents of barriers to cures.

Practical imlications

The findings suggest that the CSMs can be used to classify children's perceptions of obesity. Future childhood obesity interventions can utilise these findings to create campaigns and strategies that are more consistent with children's understandings of this condition.

Originality/value

To the authors' knowledge, no previous study has examined children's perceptions of obesity beyond perceived causes.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 113 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 15 December 2010

Resul Cesur, Chris M. Herbst and Erdal Tekin

Over the past three decades, the U.S. economy experienced a sharp increase in the labor-force participation of women, causing a similar increase in the demand for…

Abstract

Over the past three decades, the U.S. economy experienced a sharp increase in the labor-force participation of women, causing a similar increase in the demand for non-parental child care. Concurrent with these developments has been a dramatic rise in the prevalence of childhood obesity, prompting the question as to what extent the increase in child-care utilization is responsible for the growth in obesity. This chapter examines the impact of various child-care arrangements on school-age children's weight outcomes using panel data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort (ECLS-K). An advantage of the ECLS-K for our purposes is that it tracks children's child-care arrangements between Kindergarten and the 5th grade. Our fixed-effects' results suggest that non-parental child-care arrangements are not strongly associated with children's weight outcomes. Our findings are robust to numerous sensitivity and subgroup analyses.

Details

Current Issues in Health Economics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-155-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 October 2009

Sally Robinson and Kirsty Page

This paper aims to provide a summary of current policy and research related to pre‐school overweight and obesity, and to provide a rationale for why early years settings…

Downloads
3113

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a summary of current policy and research related to pre‐school overweight and obesity, and to provide a rationale for why early years settings are being placed at the forefront of strategies to address the problem.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is based on a narrative review of current research, policy and practice.

Findings

Today 22.9 per cent of four and five year olds are overweight or obese. The Healthy Weight, Healthy Lives strategy is a cross‐government initiative, which aims to make England the first major country to reverse the obesity epidemic. The pre‐school period represents a critical time for interventions, which could prevent excess weight gain and its associated physical and psychological damage to health.

Practical implications

Practitioners in early years settings have a significant contribution to make to promoting the healthy weight of children.

Originality/value

Concerns about overweight in childhood have received much attention. This paper seeks to raise awareness of the importance of the pre‐school period, and to provide a useful review of current research, policy and sources of support for those who are best placed to address the issue.

Details

Health Education, vol. 109 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Vassiliki Costarelli and Yannis Manios

The purpose of this paper is to describe and briefly discuss the prevalence of childhood obesity in selected countries of the WHO European Region in relation to…

Downloads
1267

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and briefly discuss the prevalence of childhood obesity in selected countries of the WHO European Region in relation to socioeconomic status (SES) and ethnic origin. Emphasis was given on the most recent research papers available.

Design/methodology/approach

A search was performed on relevant papers on “Prevalence of Obesity and Overweight in relation to socio‐economic status and ethnicity” using MEDLINE and the ISI Web of Science. The search was limited to the age range 0‐20 years to the countries of the WHO European Region.

Findings

A growing number of studies suggest that children in lower‐income families in developed countries are particularly vulnerable to becoming obese. Plausible explanations for the differences in obesity prevalence in migrant children and children with lower SES include poor diet, limited opportunity for physical activity and differences in the perception of ideal body weight together with possible food security issues. It is important to stress that the rising cost of a healthy diet is of great concern.

Originality/value

Understanding the prevalence of obesity in children and the social and cultural parameters related to the phenomenon can facilitate the formation of effective public health intervention policies in counteracting childhood obesity.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 39 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 October 2019

Ioannis Vassiloudis and Vassiliki Costarelli

The purpose of this paper is to investigate excess body weight and abdominal obesity in relation to selected psychosocial characteristics such as self-perception…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate excess body weight and abdominal obesity in relation to selected psychosocial characteristics such as self-perception, self-esteem and anxiety, in primary school children.

Design/methodology/approach

A school-based cross-sectional study was conducted with a total of 528 students 10-12 years of age, randomly selected, from the area of Athens, Greece. The Greek versions of the self-perception profile for children (SPPC) and the state-trait anxiety inventory for children (STAI-C) questionnaires have been used to determine the children’s self-perception/self-esteem and the status of anxiety, respectively. Standard anthropometric measurements were also taken. Pearson correlation coefficient was used to test for possible linear correlations between data variables. One-way ANOVA and independent t-test were used to determine statistically significant differences between the means of children’s body mass index (BMI) – abdominal obesity groups. For multiple comparisons, Bonferroni post-tests were run.

Findings

Overweight and obese children and children with abdominal obesity had lower scores in all of the domains of SPPC self-perception, the SPPC global self-esteem and the STAI-C anxiety levels in comparison to normal weight children. BMI and abdominal obesity correlated negatively with each one of the five domains of the SPPC self-perception (p <0.001) and the SPPC global self-esteem (p <0.001) and positively with the STAI-C anxiety levels (p <0.005). One-way ANOVA and independent t-test revealed statistically significant differences between the means of children’s BMI and abdominal obesity groups in all the domains of SPPC self-perception (p <0.001), the SPPC global self-esteem (p <0.001) and the STAI-C anxiety levels (p <0.005). There were no gender differences in the psychometric characteristics assessed in this study.

Originality/value

Primary school children with excess body weight and abdominal obesity have increased anxiety levels and they score lower in key psychosocial characteristics, in comparison to normal weight children.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science , vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Case study
Publication date: 1 August 2014

Eric D. Yordy, Nita Paden and Katlin Bryant

In 2010, approximately one-third of US children and adolescents were classified as at least overweight, with 17 percent classified as obese. In addition to other causes…

Abstract

Synopsis

In 2010, approximately one-third of US children and adolescents were classified as at least overweight, with 17 percent classified as obese. In addition to other causes, the marketing and advertising of food directly to children was identified by a Task Force on Childhood Obesity as a contributing factor. As a result, food industries began to self-regulate. Consumer advocacy organizations developed guidelines for advertising products targeted to children. Cereal companies, such as General Mills (GM), struggled with whether or not to adopt those standards. GM began to change both marketing and product advertising in small ways. The changes were considered steps in the right direction but GM continued to be under scrutiny of advocacy groups. This case addresses the struggle of General Mills to make changes to product nutritional content and/or marketing and to address the societal concern about childhood obesity while also meeting responsibilities to consumers and shareholders.

Research methodology

The case was researched utilizing secondary data – all materials are readily available to the public. There is no disguise of any actual person or entity and no relationship between the authors and the organizations or individuals mentioned in the case. Frequent sources include the General Foods, Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative and Center for Science in the Public Interest web pages.

Relevant courses and levels

This case could be used at an undergraduate or graduate level. Legal Environment of Business, Business Ethics and any Marketing course.

Theoretical basis

The ethics frameworks in most business law or ethics textbooks may be used to discuss the dilemma identified in this case. This Instructor's Manual uses Hosmer's model. Hosmer (2008), The Ethics of Management: A Multidisciplinary Approach, 7th ed.

Details

The CASE Journal, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 1544-9106

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 30 August 2019

Anne Scheer

The purpose of this study is to explore rural children’s own perspectives on health, well-being, and nutrition to better understand how they approach, navigate, and make…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to explore rural children’s own perspectives on health, well-being, and nutrition to better understand how they approach, navigate, and make sense of these topics.

Methodology/Approach

This study uses a qualitative ethnographic research design theoretically informed by the “new” Sociology of Childhood and methodologically informed by constructivist grounded theory. This ongoing study with fifth-grade students in an elementary school in a small rural school district in central Illinois consists of ethnographic observations conducted at the school, in-depth interviews with students, and participatory tools that seek to involve students more fully in the process of data collection.

Findings

Preliminary findings of this pilot study suggest that many aspects often discussed in the context of childhood obesity, especially in rural settings, including knowledge or education about healthy eating, increasing physical activity levels, or access to healthy foods, are complex and multifaceted and do not easily lend themselves to standard interventions. Findings also indicate that children’s ideas about healthy eating deviate from their own eating practices.

Research Limitations/Implications

Conceptualized as a grounded theory study, the research is not intended to be generalizable or reproducible. Instead, the study seeks to develop hypotheses directly from the field and study participants’ views and voices. These perspectives will inform a more in-depth study of childhood obesity in rural settings planned for 2019.

Originality/Value of Paper

Findings from this pilot study will inform innovative, informed interventions that are guided by children’s own experiences and perspectives. Study findings will also be of benefit to practicing pediatricians and other child health professionals as they understand how to better think about and address challenges of health and weight management of patients and their families.

Details

Underserved and Socially Disadvantaged Groups and Linkages with Health and Health Care Differentials
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-055-9

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 1000