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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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The Handbook of Road Safety Measures
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-250-0

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-222-4

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Article

Fenio Annansingh and Thomas Veli

This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate children interaction in cyberspace and their use of Web 2.0 technologies. It sought their perception of internet risks as well as their knowledge and experience with electronic safety (e-safety) measures. It also considered parents’, teachers’ and other stakeholders’ perception of internet risks, e-safety procedures and children’s practices while online.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a mixed method approach which involved the use of questionnaires and semi-structured interviews. The results were presented and analysed using descriptive statistics, while the interviews utilised coding and data structuring.

Findings

This research highlighted that e-safety policies and procedures have not kept up to date with technological advances. Children were also developing an online presence, and because it was considered normative behaviour, they were not always cautious. Consequently, society was reactive when dealing with the internet risk issues. Hence, more resources were needed to educate parents and children on safe practices on the internet.

Research limitations/implications

This is an exploratory study and further research should be conducted for broader generalisations.

Practical implications

The paper makes a number of practical recommendations for education providers and parents to raise awareness of internet risks and e-safety initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper further extends the body of theory on e-safety and provides new insights into the risks exposure of children on the internet. It also highlights the limitations of e-safety initiatives.

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Interactive Technology and Smart Education, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-5659

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Article

Caroline A. Mulvaney, Michael C. Watson and Gail Errington

The aim of this literature review was to examine recent evidence of the impact of safety education for children and young people on unintentional injury rates and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this literature review was to examine recent evidence of the impact of safety education for children and young people on unintentional injury rates and to update an earlier review. Evidence was sought that linked safety education for children and young people in schools, centres and other settings with changes in knowledge, skills, attitudes, and reductions in injury. The relevance of ten principles of effective safety education to the papers was considered.

Design/methodology/approach

A range of bibliographic databases was searched for potentially relevant papers. Titles and abstracts, and then full copies of papers were examined and retained if considered relevant.

Findings

From 495 potentially relevant papers, 12 papers were retained that met the aims of the review. The papers covered a range of topics including home safety, use of all‐terrain vehicles and pedestrian safety. While the majority of papers described the effect of an intervention on injury prevention, several described the development of an injury prevention programme. Several papers provided evidence of the impact of safety education on knowledge, behaviour, risk and skills. No papers provided evidence of the impact of safety education on injury rates.

Practical implications

The importance of involving children in designing successful safety education interventions is key. Working with multiple agencies and adoption of a broader community approach is likely to increase the effectiveness of safety education.

Originality/value

The review illustrates the value of applying the ten principles of effective safety education to designing unintentional injury prevention interventions for children and young people.

Details

Health Education, vol. 112 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Lydia Martens

This paper aims to examine, through a focus on the practice of child caring, how three qualities of childhood preciousness, vulnerability and unpredictability, are…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine, through a focus on the practice of child caring, how three qualities of childhood preciousness, vulnerability and unpredictability, are nurtured by being brought together as rationales for product re-design, innovation and diversification. The new parent of today is confronted with a myriad of products that are designed to “safeguard”, “guide” and “monitor” the young child and ensure its well-being.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on research into the organisation of encounter platforms that serve as communication forums for commercial practitioners and child carers, and includes insights derived from fieldwork and a cultural content analysis of the British retailer Mothercare, consumer exhibitions and brand–product websites.

Findings

After providing a brief outline of the research on which this paper draws, the author present three ways in which child safety is present in the market that caters for young children and their care. This is followed by a discussion of two case studies, which respectively expand on how vulnerability and unpredictability are nurtured in commercial narratives.

Originality/value

The author concludes by drawing out the implications of the risk-averse culture, which this creates.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article

Alison Cockerill

Accidents are the most common cause of death to children over the age of one year. Pre‐school children are at particular risk and account for 30 percent of child

Abstract

Accidents are the most common cause of death to children over the age of one year. Pre‐school children are at particular risk and account for 30 percent of child attendances following an accident at Hull Royal Infirmary Accident and Emergency Department. With children spending more time outside the home at pre‐schools, playgroups and nurseries there is a need to ensure that accident prevention and safety remains high on their agenda. This paper details the development of the Focus on Safety award scheme developed by a multi‐agency group in Hull. Participating groups are asked to consider their own health and safety policies and how they promote accident prevention to both children and their parents / carers. The pilot of the Award Scheme showed that it was very popular with nurseries, pre‐schools and playgroups and that it was meeting a definite need.

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Health Education, vol. 99 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article

Andrea Woolley

The millennium is almost upon us but depressingly we already know what the major child health problem will be at the start of the new century — accidents. For the whole of…

Abstract

The millennium is almost upon us but depressingly we already know what the major child health problem will be at the start of the new century — accidents. For the whole of this century and especially over the last 15 years it has been a stated aim of UK governments to reduce accidents with specific goals having been set out in documents such as The Health of the Nation and in 1998 Our Healthier Nation. However, there has been no co‐ordinated approach to the implementation of these initiatives. The copyright policy of no co‐ordination, together with other failings in production of safety promotion materials, constitute a serious barrier to success. An opportunity exists, for taking action to address these shortcomings, to develop imaginative initiatives to be put in place in time for both the millennium and the achievement of stated accident prevention goals. It is important to emphasise here the age old problem of terminology. As with any specialist subject it is often the case that words common in day to day conversation take on a slightly different or very specific meaning. Titus ‘accident’ in this context means an unintentional event leading to injury or harm to individuals. ‘Risk’ relates to the likelihood of something potentially dangerous or hazardous actually causing injury or harm. ‘Risk assessment’, therefore, means making judgements about the scale, severity and options for control of the dangerous situation or activity. Putting a perspective on the accident problem will also be helpful in explaining both why accidents pose a health problem and why children are being highlighted as a target group.

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International Journal of Advertising and Marketing to Children, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1464-6676

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Abstract

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Traffic Safety and Human Behavior
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-08-045029-2

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