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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2004

Ellen Sexton

Libraries supporting a forensic psychology undergraduate and/or graduate level college program need to collect materials from a range of disciplines – psychology, law…

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Abstract

Libraries supporting a forensic psychology undergraduate and/or graduate level college program need to collect materials from a range of disciplines – psychology, law, psychiatry and criminal justice. This guide identifies the major reference works, journals, databases and other resources that should be in a good forensic psychology collection.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 20 February 2019

Sallie Wallace Nowell, Desiree R. Jones and Clare Harrop

Sex differences in circumscribed interests (CI) may delay diagnosis for females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); therefore, it is important to characterize sex…

Abstract

Purpose

Sex differences in circumscribed interests (CI) may delay diagnosis for females with autism spectrum disorder (ASD); therefore, it is important to characterize sex differences in CI to determine if differential approaches to diagnostic assessment are warranted for females with ASD. The purpose of this paper is to examine sex differences in parent-reported quantity, content and functional impairment of children’s interests.

Design/methodology/approach

Parent responses to the Interests Scale were analyzed using descriptive statistics and ANOVAs to determine diagnostic (ASD vs typical development (TD)) and sex differences between four groups of children ages six to ten years: ASD males, ASD females, TD males and TD females.

Findings

Groups were comparable on the quantity of interests reported on the Interests Scale. Children with ASD demonstrated significantly more nonsocial interests and had greater functional impairment associated with their interests than TD children. A significant diagnosis×sex effect was found for the number of interests in folk psychology. Descriptively, males with ASD were more likely to have a primary interest in the traditionally male category of physics than females with ASD whose primary interest mainly fell into the categories of TV or the more traditionally female category of psychology.

Originality/value

These findings strengthen the results of Turner-Brown et al. (2011) by replicating their findings that children with ASD have more nonsocial interests and greater functional impairments related to their interests compared to TD children in a sample that is balanced on biological sex. However, there are distinctions between males and females with ASD in their primary interests that have implications for diagnostic assessment.

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Advances in Autism, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3868

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Larry S. Perry

Psychology, the scientific study of the mind and of behavior, has experienced a rapid professional growth during the past 30 years. The number of research articles…

Abstract

Psychology, the scientific study of the mind and of behavior, has experienced a rapid professional growth during the past 30 years. The number of research articles published each year continues to multiply, attendance at professional meetings and conferences increases at an almost exponential rate, and students continue to enroll in psychology courses in large numbers.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 3 December 2020

Fiona Cust, Helen Combes, Helena Priest and Henry Cust

Previous research has explored inter-professional education (IPE) in mental health contexts, for example, between mental health nurses and clinical psychologists (CPs)…

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has explored inter-professional education (IPE) in mental health contexts, for example, between mental health nurses and clinical psychologists (CPs). However, little research has explored IPE with children’s nurses (CNs) and CPs, who often work together in a range of in-patient and community mental health settings. Indeed, a significant proportion of CNs’ work involves identifying and responding to the mental health needs of children, young people and families; equally, CPs work directly into child teams, and their consultancy work requires awareness of other professional roles. However, knowledge and understanding of roles, and true collaborative working, appears to be limited. This study aimed to address these limitations.

Design/methodology/approach

A project was designed to bring together these two groups in an educational context, to explore ways in which collaborative working may enable effective mental health-care delivery. A total of 17 children’s nursing students and 15 clinical psychology trainees participated in a 3-day workshop, including experiential and clinical vignette work. Workshops were evaluated at three time points, using a questionnaire.

Findings

The workshops were effective in improving knowledge, skills and understanding of roles. Teamwork and discussions were helpful in modifying attitudes and perceptions. However, “defensiveness” was an important theme, demonstrating somewhat fixed beliefs about roles in relation to child mental health care.

Originality/value

Few studies have explored IPE in child mental health contexts, especially in the pre-qualification arena.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Book part
Publication date: 1 November 2003

Nancy E Barbour

History helps us to better understand current practices, struggles, and potential solutions. This chapter provides a look back at the long, rich history of child

Abstract

History helps us to better understand current practices, struggles, and potential solutions. This chapter provides a look back at the long, rich history of child development laboratory programs in the U.S. over almost 80 years. In particular, it explores the original vision of those involved in the early days of “child study” and the evolution over time of a sample of three child development laboratory programs. The struggles of today’s child development laboratory programs in the areas of funding, collaboration, research, training, and service are not unique to our times. Many of these same issues have plagued child development laboratory programs in the past. The historical perspectives were developed using a range of data sources: some period pieces (primary sources), some historical accounts, oral history interviews, and records of activity at various sites, with the intention of developing the historical foundation of the child development laboratory program in order to understand better the challenges we face today.

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Bridging the Gap Between Theory, Research and Practice: The Role of...
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-242-9

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Article
Publication date: 10 August 2015

Carmel Cefai, Valeria Cavioni, Paul Bartolo, Celeste Simoes, Renata Miljevic-Ridicki, Dejana Bouilet, Tea Pavin Ivanec, Anatassios Matsopoulos, Mariza Gavogiannaki, Maria Assunta Zanetti, Katya Galea, Paola Lebre, Birgitta Kimber and Charli Eriksson

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of a resilience curriculum in early years and primary schools to enhance social inclusion, equity and social…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the development of a resilience curriculum in early years and primary schools to enhance social inclusion, equity and social justice amongst European communities, particularly amongst disadvantaged and vulnerable ones, through quality education. It defines educational resilience in terms of academic, social and emotional growth in the face of life challenges; discusses the conceptual framework and key principles underpinning the curriculum; and presents the six major content areas of the curriculum. Finally, it presents the preliminary findings of a pilot project on the implementation of the curriculum in more than 200 classrooms in about 80 early and primary schools in six European countries.

Design/methodology/approach

The curriculum was first drafted collaboratively amongst the six partners on the basis of the existing literature in the promotion of resilience in early years and primary schools, with a particular focus to European realities. Once it was internally reviewed, it was piloted in 200 early years and primary school classrooms in six European countries, with each of the six partners implementing one theme. Data collection included teacher reflective diaries, classroom checklists, semi-structured interviews with teachers and focus groups with students.

Findings

The preliminary results from the pilot evaluation of the curriculum in 199 classrooms totalling 1,935 students across six countries indicate that both the teachers and the learners overwhelmingly found the curriculum highly enjoyable, useful, relevant and easy to use. They looked forward to the possibility of having the programme on a full-time basis as part of the general curriculum in the future. The teachers reported a positive moderate change in learners’ behaviour related to the theme implemented and argued that for the implementation to be effective, it needs to take place throughout the whole year. A number of modifications have been on the basis of the teachers’ and learners’ feedback.

Originality/value

This is the first resilience curriculum for early years and primary schools in Europe. While it seeks to address the needs of vulnerable children such as Roma children, immigrant and refugee children and children with individual educational needs, it does so within an assets-based, developmental, inclusive and culturally responsive approach, thus avoiding potential labelling and stigmatising, while promoting positive development and growth. It puts the onus on the classroom teacher, in collaboration with parents and other stakeholders, in implementing the curriculum in the classroom.

Details

Journal for Multicultural Education, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2053-535X

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Article
Publication date: 15 February 2016

Martin Guha

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Reference Reviews, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0950-4125

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Book part
Publication date: 26 July 2005

Carrie Lobman

This chapter briefly discusses the postmodern critique of developmental psychology and then presents a Vygotskian-influenced alternative understanding of development as a…

Abstract

This chapter briefly discusses the postmodern critique of developmental psychology and then presents a Vygotskian-influenced alternative understanding of development as a non-linear, relational, improvised activity engaged in by groupings of people. This reconstruction of development was the basis of a professional development project in which early childhood teachers participated in a 6-week improv workshop. The goal of the project was to reconnect the teachers with their ability to improvise or to participate in process-oriented, meaning-making activity. The project was based on the hypothesis that developing teachers’ ability to improvise would give them an alternative to relating to children as being on, or off, a developmental trajectory.

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Practical Transformations and Transformational Practices: Globalization, Postmodernism, and Early Childhood Education
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-364-8

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Janine Spencer

Reviews how children change from birth of eight years of age, in terms of perception, conceptual powers, memory and language, and relates this knowledge to responsible…

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2198

Abstract

Reviews how children change from birth of eight years of age, in terms of perception, conceptual powers, memory and language, and relates this knowledge to responsible marketing. Deals with each of these cognitive development aspects in turn: perception and attention involve ignoring irrelevant stimuli, conceptual development involves seeing the similarities between, for instance Coke and Pepsi, memory development means faster processing capacity, and language development is much faster in terms of comprehension than of production. Applies these child development findings to child marketing: gaining children’s visual attention means giving them enough variety in images, product awareness depends on conceptual development, knowing that children understand more than they say means that quite complicated phrases can be used in adverts, and the difference between memory precision and recall requires that advertising messages must be recalled by children at the appropriate time.

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Young Consumers, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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Article
Publication date: 31 December 2004

Brian Young

Looks at how children’s awareness of self and the world around them grows during their childhood, examining children’s limitations and capabilities from age six to…

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759

Abstract

Looks at how children’s awareness of self and the world around them grows during their childhood, examining children’s limitations and capabilities from age six to adulthood. Outlines two opposing research approaches to child development, one biologically determinate and deriving from Piaget, the other more culture related and associated with Vygotsky; opts for a “natural history” approach that relates children to their various contexts. Details the world of middle childhood, starting at six years of age and covering areas like language, game strategy and humour development, then moves on to the tweens, who become increasingly conscious of brands and the desirability of possessing branded goods; finally discusses youth and the frontiers of adulthood.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

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