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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2004

Amélia Bastos, Graça Leão Fernandes and José Passos

This paper is a study on child poverty from two perspectives: child income poverty (derived from family income) and child deprivation (evaluated by non‐monetary…

Abstract

This paper is a study on child poverty from two perspectives: child income poverty (derived from family income) and child deprivation (evaluated by non‐monetary indicators). On the one hand, empirical evidence supports the thesis that income‐based poverty measures and deprivation measures do not overlap. On the other hand, the relationship between poverty and the child's living conditions is not linear. Uses micro‐econometric techniques to analyse child income poverty and present deprivation indicators, and thereby an index of child deprivation, to study child poverty. The measurements used are centred on the child. The results obtained support the thesis that the study of child poverty differs whether the focus is on the child or on the family.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 31 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2004

Judith A. Chafel and Carin Neitzel

What are children’s responses to storybook characters portrayed as socioeconomically disadvantaged? Do these responses vary by gender, race, socioeconomic status, and…

Abstract

What are children’s responses to storybook characters portrayed as socioeconomically disadvantaged? Do these responses vary by gender, race, socioeconomic status, and setting? Sixty-two 8-year-old-children individually listened and responded to a story about a soup kitchen using two different communication systems: drawings and words. Categories generated from the data were analyzed using chi-square analyses, yielding statistically significant findings for each of the variables of interest. Results offer a unique, detailed picture of the conceptual schemas of 8-year-old children about poverty.

Details

Social Contexts of Early Education, and Reconceptualizing Play (II)
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-146-0

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2004

Carol Camp Yeakey, Jeanita W. Richardson and Judith Brooks Buck

Concern with the size of poverty in any nation leads to a broader question: What does it mean to be poor in a rich society? More specifically, what does it mean for a…

Abstract

Concern with the size of poverty in any nation leads to a broader question: What does it mean to be poor in a rich society? More specifically, what does it mean for a family, and particularly its children, to live in a state of poverty within a prosperous society? To begin to answer these questions, we must look at poverty in the context of its opposite, plenty. As members of modern societies, we use a wide range of goods and services to effect our participation in social relations and to create and sustain our sense of social identity. The mainstream standard of living defines the average American's family resources that fall sufficiently short of the mainstream as deprivation, precarious subsistence, exclusion – in short, poverty. Our common cultural understanding is that we cannot play our social roles or participate meaningfully in our communities without the basic material resources necessary to carry out our activities. One way or another, each of us has to “make a living” in order to “have a life.” The roles and activities that define participation are age-graded – child, teenager, young adult, mature adult, senior citizen. For any one age, these common cultural understandings allow people to pass judgment on their own rank and that of others in a continuum from destitution to unseemly affluence, based on what kind of participation they can effect.

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Suffer The Little Children
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76230-831-6

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Article
Publication date: 10 September 2018

Amélia Bastos and Carla Machado

While the literature commonly analyses child poverty and social exclusion data covering a single year, less is known about children who fall in and out of poverty over a…

Abstract

Purpose

While the literature commonly analyses child poverty and social exclusion data covering a single year, less is known about children who fall in and out of poverty over a longer period. The present research intends to address this gap by investigating the dynamics of child poverty and social exclusion in Portugal. The purpose of this paper is twofold: first, to investigate child poverty and social exclusion trajectories; and second to examine their association with specific socio-demographic and economic factors.

Design/methodology/approach

Applying the definition of “at risk of poverty or social exclusion” given by Statistical Office of the European Communities (EUROSTAT), the analysis extends beyond the concept of income poverty. The authors apply Portuguese data sourced from the European Statistics on Income and Living Conditions for the period 2008–2011 to suggest a longitudinal poverty and social exclusion typology to analyse child poverty and social exclusion dynamics.

Findings

The findings report that children constitute the age group experiencing the worst poverty and social exclusion trajectories. Furthermore, the presence of children in the household seems to be an increasing factor of poverty and social exclusion. This information is relevant to improving the design of children and family-focussed social policies as well as contributing to the setting of targets in order to achieve EU 2020 goals including the alleviation of poverty in general and of child poverty in particular.

Originality/value

The main contribution to child poverty studies derives from our analysis of the dynamics driving child poverty and social exclusion. The authors apply a methodological framework that is applicable to other EU member states and can thus enable an international comparison of poverty and social exclusion trajectories.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 45 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 19 October 2010

Amélia Bastos, Carla Machado and José Passos

Child poverty has become an important issue in social and political agendas. In Portugal, almost 25 per cent of children are at risk of poverty and the most vulnerable age…

Abstract

Purpose

Child poverty has become an important issue in social and political agendas. In Portugal, almost 25 per cent of children are at risk of poverty and the most vulnerable age group. This paper seeks to investigate child poverty in Portugal, using European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions microdata for 2004‐2008. It explores the sociodemographic and economic attributes associated with child poverty in order to design the profile of income‐poor children. Furthermore, it analyses social policies efficiency in reducing child poverty.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses descriptive methods as well as econometric tools to select the characteristics of income‐poor children and to evaluate social policy efficiency. The estimation of a discrete choice model allows inference purposes.

Findings

Results obtained show that children included in large households and in lone‐parent households, are particularly at risk. Social policies undertaken had roughly impact on child poverty.

Originality/value

This paper aims to contribute to the literature by establishing the profile of income‐poor children, which may contribute to design more efficient policies to tackle the problem of child poverty. The policy evaluation sheds light on the results obtained by the current policies suggesting the discussion of new programs.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 37 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2007

Jonathan Bradshaw, Dominic Richardson and Veli‐Matti Ritakallio

European Union (EU) indicators on poverty and social exclusion employ only two child breakdowns: the proportion of children living in households with incomes below 60% of…

Abstract

European Union (EU) indicators on poverty and social exclusion employ only two child breakdowns: the proportion of children living in households with incomes below 60% of the national median using the modified OECD equivalence scale and the proportion of children living in workless households. The UK also uses these indicators in the Opportunities for All series. This article first develops a new indicator of child poverty based on income, subjective and deprivation indicators which may be more reliable than income alone. It then explores the extent to which income poverty and worklessness represent international variation in child well‐being using an index that we have developed. The conclusions are that: (1) relative income poverty and worklessness are poor indicators of child well‐being, especially for some of the new EU countries; (2) deprivation has a stronger association with overall well‐being than relative income poverty or worklessness; (3) there are a number of other single indicators of child well‐being that could be used as proxies for overall child well‐being; and (4) The EU (and the UK) could easily develop its own index of child well‐being.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Amélia Bastos and Carla Machado

The aim of this paper is to evaluate poverty among children using a multidimensional concept of child poverty.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to evaluate poverty among children using a multidimensional concept of child poverty.

Design/methodology/approach

In light of this conceptualization, the paper applies methodological framework that uses fuzzy set theory to evaluate deprivation intensity among children. It also investigates the socio‐demographic and economic characteristics that most affect deprivation risk by estimating a discrete choice model.

Findings

Results show that children included in large families or with uncommon compositions are particularly at risk. Unemployment of parents also plays an important role in determining deprivation. Children's deprivation is particularly affected by issues related to education, health, housing and social integration.

Originality/value

This paper proposes a concept that is child‐cantered. It also constructs measures of child poverty/deprivation based on specific child indicators of well‐being. Finally uses the paper econometric techniques to evaluate socio‐demographic and economic attributes in determining deprivation odds.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 36 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 26 November 2020

Alessio Fusco and Nizamul Islam

This paper investigates the effect of household size, and in particular of the number of children of different age groups, on poverty, defined as being in a situation of…

Abstract

This paper investigates the effect of household size, and in particular of the number of children of different age groups, on poverty, defined as being in a situation of low income. We apply various static and dynamic probit models to control for the endogeneity of the variables of interest and to account for unobserved heterogeneity, state dependence, and serially correlated error components. Using Luxembourg longitudinal data, we show that the number of children of different age groups significantly affects the probability of being poor. However, the magnitude of the effect varies across different specifications. In addition, we find strong evidence of true poverty persistency due to past experience, spurious poverty persistency due to individual heterogeneity, and transitory random shocks.

Details

Inequality, Redistribution and Mobility
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-040-2

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2010

Verónica Amarante, Rodrigo Arim and Andrea Vigorito

The multidimensional nature of well-being is now widely recognized. However, multidimensional poverty measurement is still an expanding field of research and a consensus…

Abstract

The multidimensional nature of well-being is now widely recognized. However, multidimensional poverty measurement is still an expanding field of research and a consensus about the “best” composite indicator has not yet emerged. In this chapter, we provide an empirical analysis using three existing methodologies: Bourguignon and Chakravarty (2003), Alkire and Foster (2007), and Lemmi (2005); Chiappero Martinetti (2000). We present an empirical study of the convergence and divergence of poverty profiles for children in Uruguay considering the following dimensions: nutritional status, child educational achievement, housing condition, and household income. Our data gather information of 1,185 children attending public schools in Montevideo and the surrounding metropolitan area, and were specially gathered to carry out a multidimensional analysis of poverty.

Our results indicate that the three families of indexes yield very different cardinalizations of poverty. At the same time, the correlation coefficients among the three groups of measures for the generalized headcount ratio also highlight important differences in the children labeled as “more deprived.” For the generalized severity and intensity indexes the correlation coefficients increase significantly suggesting a high level of concordance among the three measures, particularly among the Bourguignon and Chakravarty methodology and the Alkire and Foster one.

Details

Studies in Applied Welfare Analysis: Papers from the Third ECINEQ Meeting
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-146-7

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Book part
Publication date: 23 May 2007

Olga Cantó, Coral del Río and Carlos Gradín

In this paper we analyse the distinct effectiveness of demographic, labour market and welfare state transfers events in promoting exits from deprivation for childbearing…

Abstract

In this paper we analyse the distinct effectiveness of demographic, labour market and welfare state transfers events in promoting exits from deprivation for childbearing households in Spain, a Southern European Country with high and persistent child poverty and a familial welfare regime. We undertake a thorough analysis of outflow rates and of the effect of events on them by household types using a detailed descriptive approach and a multivariate analysis to control for household heterogeneity. Our multivariate results imply that, in contrast with the descriptive analysis, the presence of children robustly reduces household's chances to step out of poverty. In turn, both methodologies show that the effectiveness of labour market events is consistently lower for childbearing households while their prevalence is particularly high. Also, both the prevalence and the effectiveness of events related to the beginning of state transfers are high for households without children.

Details

Inequality and Poverty
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1374-7

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