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Article

Abdul Rais A.R., Zahari M.S.M., Chik C.T. and Hanafiah M.H.

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to confirm the inter-relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour in the hospital setting.

Design/methodology/approach

A conceptual model proposed comprises of five latent variables representing healthy cafeteria attributes, perceived value, eating behaviour, satisfaction and post-purchase behaviour. A total of 570 completed questionnaires were collected, and the hypotheses were tested using structural equation modelling.

Findings

This study found that eating behaviour and satisfaction significantly mediates the relationship between healthy cafeteria attributes and customers’ post-purchase behaviour. Meanwhile, customers’ perceived value weakly moderates the relationship between healthy cafeteria and eating behaviour.

Originality/value

This paper is among the first few which attempt to holistically measure the attributes that influence people to visit healthy cafeterias and the subsequent effect they have towards their post-purchase behaviour. The novelty of this study is portrayed through the inclusion of eating behaviour and the perceived value dimension in healthy foodservice study, which is still minimal compared to commercial foodservice.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

Alessandro Bonadonna, Andrea Matozzo, Chiara Giachino and Giovanni Peira

The purpose of this paper is to analyze farmer behavior, considering their attitude toward food waste with particular focus on their involvement in the last phase of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze farmer behavior, considering their attitude toward food waste with particular focus on their involvement in the last phase of the process, the retail phase. It assesses the different approaches applied to food waste management and its future.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 35 farmers in the Porta Palazzo market, the biggest food market in the Turin Area (north-west Italy), was identified and a survey was carried out to determine the behavior and perception of farmers regarding food waste and the management of unsold food.

Findings

Results show that there is a high level of interest on the ethical and charitable aspects of food waste and unsold food. However, awareness and knowledge of the initiatives organized by institutions are not sufficient.

Practical implications

If policy makers and institutions have an understanding of farmer behavior, they can implement ad hoc initiatives to reduce food waste and build on the work already done by farmers. Additionally, farmers can help customers to better understand the products.

Originality/value

This study analyzes the perception of the food waste phenomenon for one type of traditional operator in the food supply chain, the farmer. The originality of the paper lies in the fact that it has not only considered the perception of food waste but also the management of unsold food in a market area.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 121 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article

María Eugenia Rodríguez-López, Salvador del Barrio-García and Juan Miguel Alcántara-Pilar

This study aims to examine the extent to which customers’ perceptions of restaurant authenticity facilitate the establishment’s customer-based brand equity (CBBE) – both…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the extent to which customers’ perceptions of restaurant authenticity facilitate the establishment’s customer-based brand equity (CBBE) – both directly and indirectly – via customer satisfaction. The study also analyzes whether restaurant type moderates the antecedent relationships of CBBE formation.

Design/methodology/approach

Two restaurants of different types were selected for the study: a mid-scale and a moderate/casual restaurant. Based on a final total sample of 402 customers of both restaurant types, a moderated mediation regression model was used.

Findings

It was found that the level of authenticity perceived by the restaurant visitor during the gastronomic experience is an antecedent of restaurant brand equity formation, both directly and indirectly, via customer satisfaction. Furthermore, these antecedent relationships were found to be partially moderated by restaurant type.

Research limitations/implications

Only two restaurants were used for the study. This study could be replicated by comparing other types of restaurants with differentiated characteristics to test whether the results obtained for these two types can be extrapolated to the rest.

Originality/value

There is no empirical evidence in the literature regarding the possible moderating effect of restaurant type on brand equity formation, so the particular note is the simultaneous application of CBBE measurement to the analysis of two different types of restaurant and the differences in their brand equity formation. On the other hand, there are few studies that use moderated mediation regression analysis as a methodological technique in the field of restaurants, so this is an interesting methodological contribution.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article

Shahbaz Khan, Mohd Imran Khan and Abid Haleem

Higher level of customer satisfaction for halal products can be achieved by the effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA)…

Abstract

Purpose

Higher level of customer satisfaction for halal products can be achieved by the effective adoption of halal certification through assessment and accreditation (HCAA). There are certain issues that seem detrimental towards the adoption of HCAA. The purpose of this paper is to identify the major barriers towards the adoption of HCAA and evaluate inter-relationships among them for developing the strategies to mitigate these barriers.

Design/methodology/approach

The barriers towards the adoption of HCAA are identified through an integrative approach of literature review and expert’s opinion. The inter-relationship among the identified barriers is evaluated using fuzzy-based decision-making trial and evaluation laboratory (fuzzy DEMATEL) technique, which categorises them into influential and influenced group.

Findings

The evaluation of inter-relationship among barriers using fuzzy DEMATEL indicates four influencing barriers and six influenced barriers towards the adoption of HCAA. Further, findings suggest an extensive government, and management support is vital in terms of commitment, resources and actions to realise the benefits attributed with HCAA.

Research limitations/implications

The inter-relationship among barriers is contextual and based on the perception of experts which may be biased as per their background and area of expertise. This study pertains to a specific region and can be extended to the generalised certification system.

Originality/value

The empirical base of the research provides the inter-relationship among the barriers towards the adoption of HCAA which can be effectively used as input in the decision-making process by producers, manufacturers and distributor. The policy maker can analyse the cause group and effect group of barriers to formulate policies that would help in the adoption of HCAA.

Details

Journal of Modelling in Management, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5664

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Article

Noela Michael, Charlotte Wien and Yvette Reisinger

The purpose of this study is to examine the escape motivations of the emerging market and provide suggestions for Australia’s promotion. This study adopts the push and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to examine the escape motivations of the emerging market and provide suggestions for Australia’s promotion. This study adopts the push and pull framework to identify travel motivations of Emirati nationals to Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a series of focus groups and in-depth interviews to understand the escape motivations that encourage Emiratis to leave their home country and travel to Australia for a holiday.

Findings

The results indicate that Emiratis are motivated to travel to Australia by three escape factors: physical, interpersonal and fun. The internal motivations that encourage Emiratis to escape their home country are inseparable from Australia’s external attributes that attract the Emiratis to the country.

Originality/value

The study contributes to the theory of tourist motivation by supporting it in the culturally different Muslim/Arab context, which has not been explored before. The authors argue that it is not so much what Australia offers and what escape needs the Emiratis can fulfil in Australia, but rather that Australia serves the Emiratis well and meets their escape needs.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

Keywords

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Article

Afzaal Ali, Mehkar Sherwani, Adnan Ali, Zeeshan Ali and Mariam Sherwani

This paper aims to apply the concept of traditional branding constructs, i.e. brand image, brand perceived quality, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty to a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to apply the concept of traditional branding constructs, i.e. brand image, brand perceived quality, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty to a less explored field of halal brand products – halal brand image, halal brand perceived quality, halal brand satisfaction, halal brand trust and halal brand loyalty. Second, the present research is an effort to empirically validate the interrelationships among branding constructs such as brand image, brand perceived quality, brand satisfaction, brand trust and brand loyalty in a holistic framework to confirm whether these branding constructs also work for the halal brand in the same way to gauge Chinese Muslims consumers’ purchasing intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used cross-sectional data from 481 Chinese Muslim students at 9 universities located in 3 cities of China through face-to-face and online survey methods. Data were collected from the consumers of halal milk brand. A theoretical model with the hypothesized relationships was tested with the help of the structural equation modelling procedure.

Findings

The results suggest that halal brand image has a significant and positive influence on the halal brand perceived quality, halal brand satisfaction, halal brand trust and halal brand loyalty. Similarly, the halal brand perceived quality, halal brand satisfaction, halal brand trust and halal brand loyalty significantly influence consumer halal brand purchase intention.

Research limitations/implications

This study is conducted in the halal food sector of China and specific religious and migration contexts. Further investigations of the halal food purchasing behaviour of local Muslims, as well as international Muslim students in those Western countries which are famous destinations for international students for education, could yield varying results.

Practical implications

The outcomes achieved are helpful for commerce and government organizations for policy development to better meet the burgeoning demand for halal products by Chinese Muslims. These are also very helpful for producers and exporters who intend to penetrate the halal market in non-Muslim-dominant countries such as China.

Originality/value

Studies on understanding Muslim consumers’ purchasing behaviours in non-Muslim countries are limited. Given the fact, numbers of Muslims seem a smaller amount of China’s total population, but their total numbers are large compared with total numbers in many Muslim countries. Therefore, understanding their purchasing behaviours for halal products and influential determinants concerning such purchasing behaviours adds to the literature and helps the industry to better serve and capitalise on the growing market.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article

Aries Susanty, Nia Budi Puspitasari, Sumunar Jati and Oktivia Selvina

The purpose of this paper is as follows: first, this study aims to identify the impact of internal and external factors on the implementation of halal logistics (IHL)…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is as follows: first, this study aims to identify the impact of internal and external factors on the implementation of halal logistics (IHL). Second, this study aims to investigate the impact of internal factors on the IHL through competitive pressure (COP) as a moderating variable.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used primary data that were collected through offline questionnaires. The questionnaires were intended to identify the internal and external conditions of a company and the level of the IHL. The internal condition consists of five factors, namely corporate image and reputation (CRE), entrepreneurial intensity, social responsibility (SRE), expected business benefit and halal integrity (HIN). The external factors consist of demand or customer pressure (DCP), government support (GOV), market share expansion and COP. This study considered the factors belonged to internal and external companies on the basis of the conceptual model from Ab Talib et al. (2015), Zailaini et al. (2015) and Ab Talib and Chin (2018) as they have clearly distinguished the important factors for the implementation of the concept of halal into internal and external groups and most of those factors are frequently stated by the other researchers.

Findings

There were 148 questionnaires administrated, 84.5% of which were properly filled in, completed and returned. For internal factors, the result of the study confirms that CRE, SRE and HIN have a positive significant impact on the IHL. For external factors, the result of the study confirms that DCP, GOV and COP have a positive significant impact on the IHL. Then, the result of the study also confirms that COP can make the impact of good CRE on the IHL stronger. This condition did not happen for the other internal factors.

Research limitations/implications

First, it is debatable that internal and external factors and the IHL are only measured by the Likert scales. Future research may take the benefits of inducing qualitative approaches to better measure the condition of internal and external factors and the level of IHL practices through observation and probing. Second, this study was limited to the respondents from companies in Indonesia, which is a Muslim-dominant country and this study does not take into account the differences in the target market and the company’s owner, size of operation and financial capacity. Future research should test the conceptual model in a non-Muslim country and should include controlling for variables to generate a more conducive finding. Third, this study only uses the limited variable as the internal and external factors. Therefore, as many variables represent technological, organisational and environmental factors, they could be included in the future research framework.

Practical implications

This study practically contributes to the halal concept implementation body of knowledge by identifying the relationships between the internal and external factors and the IHL. Understanding this relationship will help the management of food, beverage and ingredient companies, as well as the government or policymakers in making better decisions and strategies to strengthen the IHL.

Social implications

The IHL may help the food, beverage and ingredient companies to be competitive and achieve organisational improvements.

Originality/value

This study is among the few studies that scrutinized the rationale behind the IHL by Indonesian companies. Although halal logistics plays a key role in protecting the halal status of any given product, this topic is still rarely explored, especially with the case study of Indonesian companies.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article

Anna Shnyrkova and Marina Predvoditeleva

The purpose of this study is to identify Halal hotel attributes demanded by the Russian Muslim travelers. Following this, the study aims to investigate whether gender and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to identify Halal hotel attributes demanded by the Russian Muslim travelers. Following this, the study aims to investigate whether gender and types of travelers influence the demand for Halal hotel attributes.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were conducted to localize the list of Halal hotel attributes for the Russian business context. A self-administrated online questionnaire was designed, distributed and collected from 191 Russian Muslim customers, who have stayed at Halal hotels in the past 12 months. Data analysis includes a t-test and analysis of variance.

Findings

The study revealed a list of Halal attributes demanded by Russian Muslim customers. Also, the findings indicate that the list of the attributes demonstrated the differences in the requested attributes between gender and types of travelers.

Research limitations/implications

The study came across three main limitations. The first was that the respondents surveyed were leisure tourists. Second, the majority of the respondents have university degrees. Third, the research sample is limited to approximately 200 respondents. This research primarily contributes to tourism and hospitality management, and consumer behavior literature, as this is the first study yielding insights on a new demographic: Russian Muslim tourists.

Practical implications

The study provides a clear understanding of the Halal hotel attributes demanded by Russian Muslims that can help hotel managers to accommodate the needs of this group while, at the same time, meeting the requirements of guests of different religions.

Social implications

The study contributes to improving social relationships within the Russian Federation as it improves society’s understanding of the life principles of Muslims.

Originality/value

This is the first study investigating the demand for Halal attributes by Russian Muslim tourists. By partly covering the empty research field on this topic, the study provides meaningful direction to future research of the Russian hotels’ Halal services from both supply and demand perspectives.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

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Article

Diana Dryglas and Adrian Lubowiecki-Vikuk

The purpose of this paper is to identify Poland’s image as a medical tourism destination (MTD).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify Poland’s image as a medical tourism destination (MTD).

Design/methodology/approach

Survey data were collected from 282 German and British medical tourists, using a self-administered questionnaire. The Computer-Assisted Web Interviewing method was used to conduct the survey. Subsequently, the responses were analysed using advanced statistical tools (McNemar’s exact test, Cochran’s Q test and Chi-square test).

Findings

Before visiting Poland, the respondents perceived the country through the prism of medical attributes, whereas after the visit, they perceived it through the prism of non-medical attributes.

Research limitations/implications

Identification of a set of MTD image characteristics has important implications for scholars, allowing them to understand attributes which shape projected and perceived MTD image. Such construct can also be a useful tool for marketing planners, destination managers and marketers to create an effective marketing policy and projected image of MTDs based on these features.

Originality/value

The study fills an important gap regarding the lack of conceptual and empirical content allowing for exploration of MTD image.

Details

Tourism Review, vol. 74 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1660-5373

Keywords

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Article

Tom Baum

This paper aims to confront the most challenging issues that the hospitality industry faces. This relates to the recruitment and retention of talented future leaders. This…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to confront the most challenging issues that the hospitality industry faces. This relates to the recruitment and retention of talented future leaders. This is a long-standing issue but one that is increasing in importance as industry changes, combined with external pressures within the labour market (demographic and competitive), act to restructure the recruitment landscape in many countries.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a literature-based analysis that addresses two key questions relating to the hospitality industry and talent – does the sector need talent and, controversially, does it deserve talent? The literature has been addressed on the basis of the author’s in-depth knowledge and the use of a wide range of pertinent search terms relating to the core themes of hospitality and talent management.

Findings

The paper assesses evidence with respect to both questions, framed as propositions, and concludes that the current talent pipelines, upon which hospitality substantially depends, may not be fit for purpose, and that the wider workplace culture within hospitality is not compatible with the attraction of the best into the industry.

Research limitations/implications

The paper challenges the established practice, both within the hospitality industry, in terms of its workplace environment, and in the way its educational partners (hospitality management schools) prepare young people for the industry. The outcomes of the analysis do not provide much by way of succour to either.

Practical implications

Implicit in this paper is a call to key stakeholders (industry and education) in the search for future leaders of the hospitality industry to address and review both the industry workplace, to make it more attractive and rewarding for young graduates, and the educational model that still dominates hospitality management programmes in preparing them for careers.

Social implications

Careers in hospitality will remain “Cinderella” options for young graduates until action is taken by stakeholders to reposition the nature of the careers on offer and the focus of the programmes available in preparation for them.

Originality/value

The approach taken is the presentation of widely recognised themes in an original format.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

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