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Book part
Publication date: 20 October 2015

Mohammad Shamsuddoha

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from…

Abstract

Contemporary literature reveals that, to date, the poultry livestock sector has not received sufficient research attention. This particular industry suffers from unstructured supply chain practices, lack of awareness of the implications of the sustainability concept and failure to recycle poultry wastes. The current research thus attempts to develop an integrated supply chain model in the context of poultry industry in Bangladesh. The study considers both sustainability and supply chain issues in order to incorporate them in the poultry supply chain. By placing the forward and reverse supply chains in a single framework, existing problems can be resolved to gain economic, social and environmental benefits, which will be more sustainable than the present practices.

The theoretical underpinning of this research is ‘sustainability’ and the ‘supply chain processes’ in order to examine possible improvements in the poultry production process along with waste management. The research adopts the positivist paradigm and ‘design science’ methods with the support of system dynamics (SD) and the case study methods. Initially, a mental model is developed followed by the causal loop diagram based on in-depth interviews, focus group discussions and observation techniques. The causal model helps to understand the linkages between the associated variables for each issue. Finally, the causal loop diagram is transformed into a stock and flow (quantitative) model, which is a prerequisite for SD-based simulation modelling. A decision support system (DSS) is then developed to analyse the complex decision-making process along the supply chains.

The findings reveal that integration of the supply chain can bring economic, social and environmental sustainability along with a structured production process. It is also observed that the poultry industry can apply the model outcomes in the real-life practices with minor adjustments. This present research has both theoretical and practical implications. The proposed model’s unique characteristics in mitigating the existing problems are supported by the sustainability and supply chain theories. As for practical implications, the poultry industry in Bangladesh can follow the proposed supply chain structure (as par the research model) and test various policies via simulation prior to its application. Positive outcomes of the simulation study may provide enough confidence to implement the desired changes within the industry and their supply chain networks.

Details

Sustaining Competitive Advantage Via Business Intelligence, Knowledge Management, and System Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78560-707-3

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2008

Andrea Insch

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explain the triggers and processes of value creation in Australia's chicken meat supply chains. This industry was chosen as…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and explain the triggers and processes of value creation in Australia's chicken meat supply chains. This industry was chosen as the critical case due to the rapid rise in poultry meat consumption in western markets. This study addresses the lack of understanding about the transformation of agri‐food supply chains to provide a chronological and historical explanation of patterns of value creation in this industry.

Design/methodology/approach

A historical case study approach was chosen. Multiple primary and secondary sources were collated and analysed to describe events in narrative form.

Findings

Analysis of the patterns of value creation revealed four major phases in the evolution of Australia's chicken meat supply chains. In each phase a dominant form of value creation was identified and the triggers that facilitated the transition between phases are described.

Research limitations/implications

As the study is confined to a single industry, further research in other settings is needed to verify the patterns described. Since agri‐food supply chains are dynamic they should be continuously monitored to identify trends that resemble previous triggers and processes, or manifest as novel ones.

Originality/value

This study takes a historical perspective to identify the triggers and patterns of value creation in Australia's chicken meat supply chains. A schema of phases of value creation is offered that can potentially be applied by practitioners in other industries to diagnose the possible outcomes of prior events and actions by supply chain members.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 110 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 June 2017

Hilde Bjørkhaug, Jostein Vik and Carol Richards

Up until recent years, all agricultural production in Norway was strictly regulated through spatial policy (location), production quotas and other price and market…

Abstract

Up until recent years, all agricultural production in Norway was strictly regulated through spatial policy (location), production quotas and other price and market regulations. Prices and products were handled by the farmers’ cooperatives. International (e.g. WTO agreements) and domestic pressure has gradually loosened the governmental regulation of chicken and eggs. Economic (e.g. new ownerships), technological (innovations throughout the whole chain), political and institutional (liberalization) and cultural (e.g. in consumption and farming) changes have reconfigured the landscapes of chicken meat production, opening up new opportunities for the chicken industry. Chicken therefore makes a particularly good case for exploring recent major changes in the agri-food system. In this chapter, we investigate evolving rules, risks, challenges and opportunities in and around chicken meat value chains. Empirically, we build on interviews, document studies and statistics on the structural development of the chicken industry and we discuss how these changes are developing in other parts of the Norwegian agri-food system.

Article
Publication date: 3 July 2017

Dubravka Skunca, Igor Tomasevic, Nevijo Zdolec, Rezear Kolaj, Georgi Aleksiev and Ilija Djekic

The purpose of this paper is to analyse consumer perception of quality characteristics of chicken meat and chicken meat products in Southeast European countries (Albania…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse consumer perception of quality characteristics of chicken meat and chicken meat products in Southeast European countries (Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, FYR of Macedonia, Montenegro, and Serbia).

Design/methodology/approach

Results were collected from a field survey by using data obtained from a questionnaire directed at 2,368 consumers during 2015.

Findings

This study identified four consumer segments: “typical”, “selective”, “chicken meat preparers” and “uninterested” chicken meat consumers.

Originality/value

Older consumers (50 years) have higher interest in chicken meat quality characteristics, while women are “chicken meat preparers”. Chicken meat consumers who prefer particular chicken parts and consume chicken meat because it is nutritious are found among the working population, while the most number of consumers “uninterested” in chicken meat come from Serbia.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Iwan Vanany, Ghoffar Albab Maarif and Jan Mei Soon

Halal food market has grown significantly over the years. As consumers are becoming more aware of the significance of halal food products and certification, food industries

Abstract

Purpose

Halal food market has grown significantly over the years. As consumers are becoming more aware of the significance of halal food products and certification, food industries will benefit from a model that controls and assures halal food production. Quality function deployment (QFD) is a tool to support product design and improve food quality systems. Thus, the purpose of this study is to propose a multi-phased QFD model to identify key processes and prioritise programmes to improve halal food production.

Design/methodology/approach

The matrix in the first phase was designed using the halal assurance system (HAS) requirements and the set of production process. The relationships between HAS requirements and a set of halal critical factors [i.e. raw material (chicken), workers, procedures and documentation, equipment and premises] were established in the second phase. In the final phase, potential problems and improvement programmes arising under each critical halal phase were identified. The QFD model was developed and applied in a chicken processing plant in Indonesia.

Findings

In Matrix 1, slaughtering, meat processing and meat delivery were identified as the key process, whilst equipment, procedures and documentation and workers were determined as the most critical halal factors in Matrix 2. The final phase of the QFD approach assisted the chicken processing plant in reducing potential issues by identifying key improvement programmes. The prioritisation of improvement programmes also supports the company in decision-making and allocating their resources accordingly.

Practical implications

The multi-phased QFD model can be designed and adapted to specific food industry. It can be used to assure halal food production and inform food industry which area to prioritise and to allocate resources accordingly. The improvement of halal food production will assist food companies to target and access international markets.

Originality/value

This study proposed a new multi-phased QFD model that can be used as a halal food assurance and prioritisation tool by the food industry. This model will benefit food industry intending to implement halal assurance scheme in their process, halal auditors and policymakers.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 10 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 April 2020

Iwan Vanany, Kim Hua Tan, Nurhadi Siswanto, Niniet Indah Arvitrida and Firman Mega Pahlawan

In recent years, halal food industries are facing a high level of competition. The growing demand for halal food means firms are working hard to improve quality and reduce…

Abstract

Purpose

In recent years, halal food industries are facing a high level of competition. The growing demand for halal food means firms are working hard to improve quality and reduce halal food defects. The purpose of this study is to propose a halal-based six sigma (SS) framework that could be used to reduce halal food defects and improve compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed halal six sigma (HSS) framework has five phases based on the define-measure-analyse-improve-control (DMAIC) approach. The proposed framework also integrates halal assurance system requirements into HSS to ensure compliance. Tools used in the proposed model include SIPOC tools, Pareto diagram, root cause analysis and the improvement process flows. A case study in a chicken meat company is used to test and validate the proposed framework. In case of study research, brainstorming was used to review an initial proposed framework and focus group discussions were used to determine feasible improvement actions.

Findings

The results showed that the proposed HSS framework could be effective to detect and reduce the halal defects and lower the halal defect costs. By adopting the framework, the case firm was able to lower halal defect costs significantly and increase the SS level.

Practical implications

SS approach can be designed and adapted to specific food industry. HSS framework could provide a systematic approach to reduce halal food defects and sustain the improvement efforts. The proposed HSS framework is also easy to use to understand halal critical points and improve halal compliance.

Originality/value

This study proposed a HSS framework that can be adopted to reduce halal food defects and costs. This proposed framework will benefit the halal food industry intending to realize zero halal food defects and lower production costs. The limited number of publications in the research theme of halal food defects show that there is a significant gap in the existing body of knowledge.

Details

Journal of Islamic Marketing, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-0833

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 August 2014

Daniel Thiel, Thi Le Hoa Vo and Vincent Hovelaque

During a crisis situation, a poultry supply chain is faced with high variations on fresh chicken meat demand and has therefore to simultaneously manage excessive…

Abstract

Purpose

During a crisis situation, a poultry supply chain is faced with high variations on fresh chicken meat demand and has therefore to simultaneously manage excessive shelf-life stocks (in case of falling demand) and external purchases due to inventory shortages. In this case, the production plan is often established according to non-accurate sale forecasts which require ongoing adjustment. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

By using system dynamics, the paper developed a model of the French poultry supply chain during a given avian influenza crisis period. The authors compared exponential smoothing forecasting method to a word-of-mouth diffusion model which makes sense in a sanitary crisis context.

Findings

An interesting result shows a complex relationship between the sanitary risk (which increases according to the slaughtered chicken's volume and storage time) and the additional external purchases (in case of low production generated by an insufficient forecasting launched 40 days before customer orders).

Research limitations/implications

Additional costs which vary over time are required for further assumptions testing.

Practical implications

The paper proposes to use a forecasting model which is not currently used by the professionals during a sanitary crisis period. This model is able to simulate an internal dissemination of a call for boycott of meat products (cf. negative word-of-mouth spread).

Originality/value

The problem is how to maintain a less risky but significant buffer size to respond to a supply chain coping with both changes in customers’ demand and instability in production capacity.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Parminder Singh

The aim of the paper is to shed light on the use of chitosans and chitooligosaccharides as biopreservatives in various foods animal. Foods of animal and aquatic origin…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of the paper is to shed light on the use of chitosans and chitooligosaccharides as biopreservatives in various foods animal. Foods of animal and aquatic origin (milk, meat, fish, eggs, sea foods, etc) become contaminated with a wide range of microorganisms (bacteria, molds and yeasts) during harvesting, transporting, processing, handling and storage operations. Due to the perishable nature of these foods, their preservation is of utmost importance. Though many synthetic chemicals are available, yet their use is quite restricted due to their hazardous effects on human health.

Design/methodology/approach

Within the domain of food industry, traditionally chitosan is used for biopreservation of foods, which is well known for its nutritional and medicinal properties in human nutrition. However, chitooligosaccharides also possess a number of nutraceutical and health promoting properties in addition to their preservative effect and shelf-life extension of foods. In this study, the comparative effects of both chitosan and chitooligosaccharides on preservation of foods of animal and aquatic origin have been summarized.

Findings

Though chitosan has been extensively studied in various foods, yet the use of chitooligosaccharides has been relatively less explored. Chitooligosaccharides are bioactive molecules generated from chitosan and have several advantages over the traditional use of chitosan both in food products and on human health. But unfortunately, little or no literature is available on the use of chitooligosaccharides for preservation of some of the foods of animal origin. Notable examples in this category include cheese, beef, pork, chicken, fish, sea foods, etc.

Originality/value

This paper focuses on the effects of chitosans and chitooligosaccharides on the processing and storage quality of foods of animal and aquatic origin, which offers a promising future for the development of functional foods.

Details

Nutrition & Food Science, vol. 46 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0034-6659

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 June 2018

Gustavo Schiavo, Andre Luis Korzenowski, Eduardo Roberto Soares Batista, Davenilcio Luiz de Souza and Annibal Scavarda

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the perception of the cold chicken meat value in its supply chain and how to manage the influence of quality demands in this supply…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the perception of the cold chicken meat value in its supply chain and how to manage the influence of quality demands in this supply chain. It is based on the views that retails and restaurants have about the main quality aspects required to meet their end customers.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper surveyed 135 respondents from restaurants, butcheries, supermarkets, and convenience stores located in the Southern Brazilian metropolitan area. Principal component analysis followed by quality function deployment was performed to analyze the data.

Findings

The principal component analysis results in seven factors: product quality and flexibility of delivery; supply flexibility; responsiveness to market changes and product assortment; measurements of the inventory and competitiveness; product specificity; product availability and specificity cost; and delivery frequency. The comparative study on the steps of the process between restaurants and retailers shows that distribution, cutting and packaging are the key process steps in this chain.

Practical implications

The results show what process steps must be prioritized to comply with the customers’ quality requirements. Since the most important process steps are different for different customers, companies may elect what steps require more attention to satisfy the most profitable customer types.

Originality/value

Several studies are found in the literature that present a theoretical discussion on the quality demands of perishable products. The management of factors related to the process steps can help members of the supply chain in their decision-making processes. The contribution of this research is to identify, by an applied study, how the demanded quality aspects should be considered by the poultry industry to satisfy customers in different market segments.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 May 2007

L. Manning, R.N. Baines and S.A. Chadd

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the current status of the poultry meat supply chain.

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse the current status of the poultry meat supply chain.

Design/methodology/approach

The research included a literature review and evaluation of financial performance data to determine the market conditions that have impacted on both individual organisations and supply chains.

Findings

The financial data has demonstrated, for the transnational corporations (TNC) studied, a significant reduction in financial performance over the last 12 months. This is due in part to the influence of avian influenza, but also to the over supply of poultry meat and increased production costs. The ongoing management of risk within this context needs to not only address traditional risk factors, but also in publicly traded organisations address the effective management of investment risk to ensure continued shareholder confidence and organisational viability.

Originality/value

This research is of academic value and of value to those working in the food supply chain.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 109 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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