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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

Teresa L. Scheid, Dennis R. Joyner, Marcus G. Plescia and Kelly Blasky

Improving access and the quality of health services requires community health initiatives. However, in order for such efforts to be successful, there has to be some…

Abstract

Improving access and the quality of health services requires community health initiatives. However, in order for such efforts to be successful, there has to be some agreement at the community level as to which community initiatives ought to be pursued. With diversity of population, health disparities, limited resources, and competing needs, agreement is unlikely; instead a negotiated consensus among key stakeholders (community advocates, agency leaders, service providers, and consumers) must be developed. A negotiated consensus takes into account differences and allows for some kind of resolution of these differences in order to achieve a given end. A negotiated consensus is necessary for the identification of common goals, prioritizing these goals, and either seeking funding or utilizing available funding for selected community initiatives. The chapter examines efforts by a regional health care system which fostered community initiatives in four diverse sites. We develop a framework which can guide other community initiatives in health care.

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Access, Quality and Satisfaction with Care
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-420-1

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Book part
Publication date: 8 November 2003

Elizabeth F Vann

This essay examines a common assertion among middle-class shoppers in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, that place of manufacture, rather than brand markers, largely determines…

Abstract

This essay examines a common assertion among middle-class shoppers in Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam, that place of manufacture, rather than brand markers, largely determines the quality of goods. For shoppers in Ho Chi Minh City, unity of place, people, raw materials, and trade secrets at the source – a corporation’s home country – is essential to the production of high quality goods. This stands in contrast to the brand logic through which corporations outsource their production presumably without compromising product quality. By privileging production sites over brands, shoppers in Ho Chi Minh City interpret the recent increase of famous foreign brand name goods in Vietnam as an increase of domestic, rather than foreign goods.

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Anthropological Perspectives on Economic Development and Integration
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-071-5

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Peter Scourfield

This article is based on a small‐scale study into a tai chi class for older people at risk of falling. The aims of the research were first, to explore what benefits the…

Abstract

This article is based on a small‐scale study into a tai chi class for older people at risk of falling. The aims of the research were first, to explore what benefits the class members felt they derived from practising tai chi and second, and more specifically, whether or not the class members actually practised tai chi at home. The study was based on two broad assumptions. The first being that the practice of tai chi has benefits for older people at risk of falling. The second assumption being that, such benefits that might result from tai chi, increase with more frequent practice. The latter assumption prompted the desire to investigate whether the class members practised tai chi at home. It was hoped that if it was discovered that class members derived benefits from tai chi, and were, for whatever reason, prevented from practising at home, that some solutions could be found in order to facilitate further practice.The research revealed, somewhat surprisingly, that the members did not believe that tai chi had necessarily reduced their risk of falling. However, notwithstanding this, their commitment to tai chi was very strong. The findings suggest that tai chi had a symbolic value for this predominantly middle‐class group. It allowed them to ‘buy into’ a third age lifestyle, despite increasing intimations of entering the fourth age. The members used tai chi, not only to improve balance and fitness, but also as a means of achieving a positive self‐image. It was therefore an age‐resisting strategy that operated on both a physical and symbolic level.

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Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1998

Richard Beilock, Katherine Wilkinson and Vera Zlateva

Uses experiences in Bulgaria to exemplify market entry and control strategies employed by franchisors in a business environment that is geographically and culturally…

Abstract

Uses experiences in Bulgaria to exemplify market entry and control strategies employed by franchisors in a business environment that is geographically and culturally remote from the West. Carries out interviews in 1996 with Bulgarian franchisors and franchisees to test a number of hypotheses relating to issues including the type of franchisor, system densities, market entry strategies and monitoring tactics. Identifies 17 environmental factors ‐ cultural, organisational, political and legal ‐ which represent possible areas of conflict between the franchisor and franchisee. Establishes that franchisors adapt to a remote business environment in a variety of ways in respect of both market entry and monitoring strategies ; establishes some significant correlations between different types of franchisors and their strategies. Finds that western franchisors and Bulgarian owned firms often place different emphasis on the relative importance of environmental factors. Observes a broad variation in market entry tactics. Recommends that franchisors need to establish criteria to establish risks in remote business environments and devise appropriate strategies prior to entry.

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Management Research News, vol. 21 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0140-9174

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2005

Zhilong Tian, Yuanqiong He, Changxu Zhao and Guangxi Yi

Compared with the fierce price competition in 1998, the well‐order price competition is witnessed in Chinese iron and steel industry now and the pricing behaviors of steel…

Abstract

Compared with the fierce price competition in 1998, the well‐order price competition is witnessed in Chinese iron and steel industry now and the pricing behaviors of steel firms also follow the certain rules. Based on the methods of collecting the secondary data and interviewing, this paper examines the pricing behaviors of firms to explain the how Chinese steel firms make their pricing decisions and maintain the well‐order competitive relationship among them. The authors found out that (1) most Chinese steel companies adopt a kind of strategic perspective in their pricing decision making, in which understanding of the market trend and the close attention to their competitors are both important; (2) there obviously exists price leader and followers in Chinese iron and steel industry, and the relationship between price leader and followers is relatively stable and the factor behind this phenomenon is the existence of a kind of informal platform of communication among competitors, government and trade associations.

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Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 17 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 1998

Paul Herbig and Drew Martin

Talks about the cultural aspects of negotiating in China and compares this with Western approaches. Focuses on cultural factors (and the dominant role of Confucianism)…

Abstract

Talks about the cultural aspects of negotiating in China and compares this with Western approaches. Focuses on cultural factors (and the dominant role of Confucianism), followed by steps in the negotiating process. Explains Confucian ethics and how that translates into everyday behaviour of how to treat and address other people. Points out that the Chinese will only do business with people they know and trust, so the importance of first building good personal relationships cannot be overstated. Suggests ways to make a good first impression, including attending banquets and other social occasions, although that opens up a further behavioural minefield. Recommends viewing doing business with the Chinese as a marriage contract based on old‐fashioned courting, rather than in the West, where entering a business relationship could be deemed the equivalent of a marriage of convenience.

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Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2005

Ray Marks

The first aim of this review article is to systematically summarise, synthesise, and critically evaluate the research base concerning the use of two art forms, namely…

Abstract

Purpose

The first aim of this review article is to systematically summarise, synthesise, and critically evaluate the research base concerning the use of two art forms, namely, dance‐based exercises and Tai Chi, as applied to people with arthritis (a chronic condition that results in considerable disability and, particularly in later life, severely impacts the life quality of the individual with this condition). A second is to provide directives for health educators who work or are likely to work with this population in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

The material specifically focuses on examining the efficacy of dance therapy and Tai Chi as intervention strategies for minimising arthritis disability and dependence and improving life quality. The paper includes a review of all relevant articles published in the English language on the topic.

Findings

Collectively, these data reveal that dance‐based exercises and Tai Chi – practiced widely in China for many centuries as an art form, as well as a religious ritual, relaxation technique, exercise, and self‐defence method – may be very useful rehabilitation strategies for people with different forms of arthritis.

Originality/value

While more research is indicated, health educators working with people who have chronic arthritis can safely recommend these two forms of exercise to most people with arthritis with the expectation that both will heighten the life quality of the individual with this condition.

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Health Education, vol. 105 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 6 June 2016

Deborah Elizabeth Swain and James Earl Lightfoot

The purpose of this paper is to show how Tai Chi (or T’ai Chi ch’uan) philosophy might be used in global project development. Collected case studies support a Tai Chi

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show how Tai Chi (or T’ai Chi ch’uan) philosophy might be used in global project development. Collected case studies support a Tai Chi-based framework for global project teams to reduce stress and improve decision making through exercises, storytelling, and martial arts practices. The authors first proposed a model or procedural framework based on experiential knowledge from practicing Tai Chi while managing projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Analyzing case studies from knowledge managers, project managers, and executive leaders, the researchers collected data on applying the framework from a retrospective case study and from two observational case studies during project development. Tai Chi-based communications and exercises were shown to support critical thinking, knowledge sharing, and problem solving. The proposed framework and four-step procedure build on a global perspective to cultural awareness, creativity, and motivation as well as specific Tai Chi-based tactics, techniques, and operations for knowledge management. This preliminary study looks at improving collaboration in a competitive environment while supporting health, wellness, and work-life enjoyment.

Findings

Early research results suggest that teams and individuals working on projects and practicing Tai Chi might develop more cohesive strategies and improve soft skills during their integration of Eastern and Western philosophies.

Research limitations/implications

Used case studies methodology, which provided examples of using Tai Chi during projects. Qualitative data used to develop the proposed framework. Also, interviews and discussion reviews conducted for additional validation collected on framework.

Practical implications

It is a pioneering, preliminary study. Future research with outcomes-based data from project managers using Tai Chi recommended.

Originality/value

The integration of Eastern and Western philosophies into a framework for team project and knowledge management was shown to support cohesive strategies, improve soft skills, and strengthen decision making.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2016

Benjamin Clapham and Kai Zimmermann

The purpose of this paper is to study price discovery and price convergence in securities trading within a fragmented market environment where stocks are traded on…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study price discovery and price convergence in securities trading within a fragmented market environment where stocks are traded on multiple venues. The results provide novel empirical insights questioning the generalizability of the current literature and aim to expand the understanding of price determination in a fragmented market microstructure.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides an empirical data analysis based on an event study methodology. The authors applied Thomson Reuters Tick History data covering German blue chip stocks listed on multiple venues in 2009 and 2013. Different time aggregations up to one second are applied to provide an in-depth analysis.

Findings

The paper empirically discovers a persistent price leader-follower relationship not only during intraday auctions but also in subsequent continuous trading. The authors found that trading on alternative venues instantly dries out in case the dominant market switches to a call auction. In these situations, alternative markets await and adopt the official price signal of the dominant market although prices on alternative venues still indicate a certain extent of price discovery. This phenomenon remains persistent at different levels of market fragmentation, indicating that alternative trading venues fully accept the price leadership role of the dominant market, no matter their own market share.

Originality/value

This paper provides an innovative empirical setup to analyze price co-movement and convergence based on high-frequent data. Further, the results provide novel and robust insights into the price determination process in fragmented markets that clarify the role of price follower and price leader.

Details

International Journal of Managerial Finance, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1743-9132

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2006

L.A. Benson, A. Boyd and K. Walshe

This paper aims to present the findings from research commissioned by the Commission for Health Improvement (CHI), which set out to examine the impact of CHI's clinical…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to present the findings from research commissioned by the Commission for Health Improvement (CHI), which set out to examine the impact of CHI's clinical governance reviews on NHS trusts in England.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper, giving a stratified random sample of 30 NHS trusts, was taken from a set of 75 trusts reviewed by CHI during a period from 2001 to 2003. Documents from these trusts' reviews were analysed. A postal questionnaire was sent to key stakeholders with an involvement or direct interest in each trust's review. Semi‐ structured telephone interviews were held with five to six people from each of four trusts selected as case studies.

Findings

In this paper the clinical governance review process was characterized by wide variability in methods, application and effects, in the initial CHI visit and report, and the subsequent NHS trust action plan and SHA progress review. The recommendations made by reviews for change in an NHS trust were often of a nature or expressed in terms, which made measuring their subsequent implementation and impact problematic. CHI recommendations concentrated on management and support processes rather than on direct patient care and outcomes. Trusts were generally willing to accept and then enact CHI review recommendations.

Practical implications

The paper concluded that a more focused and controlled review process would support greater change and improvement. There was evidence to suggest that this kind of regulatory intervention can have largely positive impacts on the organisational performance of NHS trusts, although these positive effects were mainly indirectly related to the delivery of patient care and health improvement. Any future review or inspection processes should place a greater focus upon patient outcomes if such reviews are to demonstrate their value in making a contribution to improving health.

Originality/value

The paper shows that, internationally, there have been few empirical studies analysing the work of health care regulators and their impact on the organisations they regulate. While the work of CHI has been examined by others, this study is the first empirical and largely quantitative analysis of CHI's regulatory regime and its impact within the English NHS. The article is also published at a time when there is much debate about regulatory functions and forms for health and social care.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

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