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Article

Sang Thanh Le and Chi Dao Vo

This paper aims to provide a deep understanding of rural household livelihoods in the Mekong Delta and to explore how they can cope with climate stressors at the ground level.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to provide a deep understanding of rural household livelihoods in the Mekong Delta and to explore how they can cope with climate stressors at the ground level.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employs the sustainable livelihood framework at a household and also an individual scale. The general data obtained from a survey of 2,100 households provide an overview of their livelihoods. Qualitative and quantitative methods were adopted, as case studies, to comprehensively assess 100 households in one commune affected by annual floods and an additional 100 households in another commune affected by sea level rises. Livelihood profile analysis is beneficial to identify specific livelihood change patterns that have taken place in these specific cases.

Findings

There are four types of livelihood adaptation to climate stressors: (1) change of structure of agricultural systems, (2) change of employment locations, (3) resettlement with strong impact on livelihoods and (4) out-migration. The household livelihood resources and the local economic structures have significant roles in driving adaptive solutions.

Research limitations/implications

This paper provides detailed profiles of the livelihood change considered as passive adaptation of smallholders in the Mekong Delta.

Originality/value

It contributes to the knowledge of rural households in multiple aspects with regard to how they cope with climate change via reflection on their livelihoods.

Details

Journal of Agribusiness in Developing and Emerging Economies, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-0839

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Book part

Lúa Xuân Đoàn

Since the 1986 initiation of Vietnam’s Đổi Mới economic policies designed to increase national Gross Domestic Product and increase international market competitiveness…

Abstract

Since the 1986 initiation of Vietnam’s Đổi Mới economic policies designed to increase national Gross Domestic Product and increase international market competitiveness, the country has undergone drastic changes in infrastructure, industrialization levels, market practices and standards of living. These changes are creating an abundance of unprecedented transformations among the many ethnic minority groups, who are used as a source of tourism revenue due to their unique cultural customs, clothing, and languages that differ from Vietnam’s majority ethnic group, the Kinh. Yet, while these groups are being exoticized for their rich cultural history and practices, they are simultaneously being required to discard many traditional livelihood methods and practices in order to keep up with the swiftly changing economy and social space. Despite these ethnic minority communities being presented as the main attraction in many areas, unequal economic and social distribution compared to areas mainly composed of Kinh can be seen. Similar findings have been discovered across other ethnically diverse areas of the country. Despite flourishing tourism to the region and steady rates of regional growth in gross domestic product, a gender analysis reveals the inequalities that undergird the system. This chapter confirms the impact of tourism on development when gender is not mainstreamed into development planning and implementation.

Details

Gender and Practice: Knowledge, Policy, Organizations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-388-8

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Article

Robert Funnell and Hien Chi Dao

This paper aims to outline some of the social, cultural, political and economic conditions in which four of only seven women who have become rectors of public universities…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline some of the social, cultural, political and economic conditions in which four of only seven women who have become rectors of public universities in Vietnam. Their experiences are described with a focus on the context of Vietnam in order to focus more clearly on non‐western starting points for theory about career development in higher education in Vietnam and other non‐western settings.

Design/methodology/approach

A combination of historical and personal accounts is used to situate the points of view of Vietnamese women and to argue for the processes of becoming a rector as an important and significant point for understanding how women gain entry to high‐status and previously all‐male domains.

Findings

Findings demonstrate that while family/career relationships are crucial in reporting these women's experiences, too much emphasis on these aspects can divert attention away from the conditions historically blocking the initial journey into high‐status parts of an organisation. These processes in which this is initiated cannot be fully contained within western theory and literature.

Research limitations/implications

The sample size of four is a limitation and the interviews do not extend to colleagues and family members, but the four women represent over half of the total population of Vietnamese women rectors. On balance though, the research contains implicit material that would be of interest to others in the area to build on with further case studies either in Vietnam or other Asian countries.

Practical implications

The experiences of the women rectors could provide examples lacking in Vietnamese society and in literature there. The experiences could be a role model for other women's pursuits of careers in Vietnam.

Social implications

The paper contributes in identifying processes of becoming and their reliance on social conditions from the personal powers can be generated. For this framework to be effective, factors such as management style adopted when women are “at the top” must be separated from conditions that have made the “journeys to the top” possible in the first place.

Originality/value

The paper is the first of its type on women's careers in Vietnam and contributes to the development of further studies into individual women, for women's groups and academic debate in Vietnamese society. The paper could provide some discussion on where strategies might be most appropriately devised and implemented to counter loss of small gains made in women's careers and within the values in Vietnamese society.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 28 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

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Article

Philip Hallinger, Allan Walker and Gian Tu Trung

The purpose of this paper is to review both international and domestic (i.e. Vietnamese language) journal articles and graduate theses and dissertations on educational…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to review both international and domestic (i.e. Vietnamese language) journal articles and graduate theses and dissertations on educational leadership in Vietnam. The review addresses two specific goals: first, to describe and critically assess the nature of the formal knowledge base on principal leadership in Vietnam, second, to synthesize findings from the existing literature on principal leadership in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper employed a method for conducting systematic reviews of research. The authors conducted a detailed, exhaustive search for international and “local” papers from Vietnam, yielding 120 research sources. Information from these papers was extracted and evaluated prior to analysis. Data analysis included both quantitative description of the “review database” as well as critical synthesis of substantive findings.

Findings

The review supports and extends an earlier review which found that the practice of educational leadership in Vietnam remains largely “invisible” to the international community of scholars. The review also yielded a highly critical assessment of research perspectives and methods used in the “local” Vietnamese studies which comprised the bulk of the authors’ database. Synthesis of substantive findings highlighted the manner by which organizational, political, and socio-cultural forces in the Vietnamese context shapes the practice of school leadership.

Research limitations/implications

First, qualitative studies are recommended that seek to describe, in-depth, the enactment of leadership in the Vietnamese context. Second, broad-scale surveys of characteristics, attitudes, and beliefs of school leaders across Vietnam are warranted. Third, the authors encourage graduate students and scholars studying school leadership in Vietnam to undertake a new generation of theory-informed studies that connect with the global literature.

Practical implications

Due to the relatively weak nature of the existing knowledge base, the authors were unable to identify specific implications for leadership practice. However, practical implications are identified for developing the research capacity needed to improve research quality in Vietnam’s universities.

Originality/value

This review is the first systematic review of educational leadership and management conducted of the Vietnamese literature. Moreover, the authors suggest that the review is original in its comprehensive coverage of both the local and international literature on educational leadership in Vietnam.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 53 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

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Article

Susan Elizabeth Mate, Matthew McDonald and Truc Do

The purpose of this study is to contrast how the relationship between career and leadership development and workplace culture is experienced by women in two different…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to contrast how the relationship between career and leadership development and workplace culture is experienced by women in two different countries and the implications this has for human resource development initiatives.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a qualitative narrative research design to understand how the lived experiences of Australian and Vietnamese early- to mid-career female academics is engendered.

Findings

The study identified a number of key barriers and enablers that affected women’s career and leadership development. For the Australian participants, the main barrier included the competing demands of work and life and male dominated organisational cultures that discriminate against women in covert ways. The main enabler was mentoring and the building of professional networks that provided their careers with direction and support. For the Vietnamese participants, the main barriers were overt and included male-dominated organisational and societal cultures that limit their career and leadership development opportunities. The main enabler was having a sponsor or person with power in their respective organisation who would be willing to support their career advancement and gaining recognition from colleagues and peers.

Research limitations/implications

Gaining a deeper understanding of the barriers and enablers that effect women’s career and leadership development can be used to investigate how culturally appropriate developmental relationships can create ways to overcome the barriers they experience.

Originality/value

The study analysed the contrasting experiences of barriers and enablers from two cultures. The participants narrated stories that reflected on the gender politics they experienced in their career and leadership development. The narrative comparisons provide a unique lens to analyse the complex cultural experience of gender and work with potential implications for human resource development.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article

Bill Pietrucha

Vietnam's industrial evolution is luring U. S. companies as the country emerges from political banishment.

Abstract

Vietnam's industrial evolution is luring U. S. companies as the country emerges from political banishment.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Article

Vu Thi Minh-Uyen and Seongah Im

This study examined psychometric properties of the ten-item Connor–Davidson resilience scale (CD-RISC-10) among university undergraduate students in Vietnam.

Abstract

Purpose

This study examined psychometric properties of the ten-item Connor–Davidson resilience scale (CD-RISC-10) among university undergraduate students in Vietnam.

Design/methodology/approach

The study followed a cross-sectional design using a sample of 414 students from multiple universities in Southern Vietnam. Three bilingual experts back-translated the provided scale to verify its content. Factor analyses were used to explore and confirm the scale structure, and item response theory (IRT) model for polytomous responses was selected to further examine individual items and the entire scale.

Findings

Factor analyses confirmed a single-dimensional structure of the CD-RISC-10. IRT analysis demonstrated that individual items and the entire scale reliably measured resilience. However, probabilities to endorse the lowest category were particularly low for most of the items, suggesting a potential to modify the number of the response categories. The overall results indicated that the CD-RISC-10 in Vietnamese was a reliable and accurate tool to measure a range of university students' resilience levels.

Research limitations/implications

Convenience sampling method, the use of self-reported survey and the inclusion of only university students were limitations of the study. However, using IRT to thoroughly examine the CD-RISC-10 was an important contribution to the work of validating research instruments.

Practical implications

The CD-RISC-10 could be a valid, reliable and convenient assessment tool for school psychologists and psychiatrists to use in trainings, counseling services or resilience intervention programs.

Originality/value

While many studies have investigated psychometric properties of the CD-RISC-10 in other languages, none has been conducted in Vietnamese.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

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Article

Tuan Luu, Chris Rowley, Sununta Siengthai and Vo Thanh Thao

Notwithstanding the rising magnitude of system factors in patient safety improvement, “human factors” such as idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) which also contribute to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Notwithstanding the rising magnitude of system factors in patient safety improvement, “human factors” such as idiosyncratic deals (i-deals) which also contribute to the adjustment of system deficiencies should not be neglected. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of value-based HR practices in catalyzing i-deals, which then influence clinical error control. The research further examines the moderating role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) on the effect of value-based HR practices on i-deals.

Design/methodology/approach

The data were collected from middle-level clinicians from hospitals in the Vietnam context.

Findings

The research results confirmed the effect chain from value-based HR practices through i-deals to clinical error control with CSR as a moderator.

Originality/value

The HRM literature is expanded through enlisting i-deals and clinical error control as the outcomes of HR practices.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article

Tho Ngoc Nguyen

Most of 823,000 ethnic Chinese people are living in Southern Vietnam among distinct dialectical groups. Each maintains its own pantheon of gods; the majority worships…

Abstract

Purpose

Most of 823,000 ethnic Chinese people are living in Southern Vietnam among distinct dialectical groups. Each maintains its own pantheon of gods; the majority worships standardized Thien Hau. The Hakka in Buu Long are the only group that worships the craft-master gods. This difference creates a challenging gap between the subgroups and reveals the unorthodox nature of the Hakka’s traditions. The purpose of this paper is investigate the continuous efforts to achieve “evolving standardization” and solidarity through the charismatic efforts of the local Hakka elites in Buu Long by their liturgical transformation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study further discusses the multilateral interaction and hidden discourses by applying Watson’s (1985) theory of standardization and orthodoxy as well as Weller’s (1987) concept of context-based interpretation.

Findings

Truthfully, when facing pressures, the Hakka in Southern Vietnam decided to transform their non-standard worship of the craft masters into a more integrative model, the Thien Hau cult, by superimposing the new cult on the original platform without significant changes in either belief or liturgical practice. The performance shows to be the so-called “the caterpillar’s spirit under a butterfly’s might” case.

Research limitations/implications

The transformation reveals that the Hakka are currently in their endless struggles for identity and integration, even getting engaged in a pseudo-standardization.

Social implications

This Hakka’s bottom-up evolutionary standardization deserves to be responded academically and practically.

Originality/value

The paper begins with a setting of academic discussions by western writers in this area and then moves on to what makes the practical transformation, how does it happen, and what discourses are hidden underneath.

Details

Asian Education and Development Studies, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-3162

Keywords

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Article

Quan H.N. Tran

The purpose of this paper is to challenge the influence of organisational culture types on leadership behaviour and job satisfaction. The theory of culture was divided…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to challenge the influence of organisational culture types on leadership behaviour and job satisfaction. The theory of culture was divided into four characteristics, namely, clan, hierarchy, adhocracy and market.

Design/methodology/approach

A purposive questionnaire was adapted to collect surveys from 294 working people in several sector organisations in Vietnam. The questionnaire included two main parts. The first part comprising demographic questions. The second part included three constituted scales to evaluate organisational culture types, leadership behaviour and job satisfaction. Correlation and linear regression analysis were adapted to use to challenge connections among variables.

Findings

Hierarchy culture negatively connected to relationship-oriented leadership behaviour. Adhocracy culture positively affected job satisfaction. Clan and market cultures insignificantly predicted leadership style and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

The research is structured in 294 working people in various Vietnamese sector organisations. This small sample is unlikely to represent the popularity of the findings. Further research should collect samples in more organisations and industries in Vietnam to improve the efficiency of the results. The research findings may support leaders and superiors to choose a proper organisational culture that will reduce employee dissatisfaction.

Originality/value

The research is conducive to the studies on organisational culture, especially the association between leadership behaviour and job satisfaction in Vietnamese sector organisations

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 29 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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